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Juha Kämäräinen

Bio: Juha Kämäräinen is an academic researcher from University of Oulu. The author has contributed to research in topics: Information literacy & Information seeking. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 8 publications receiving 25 citations.

Papers
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Book ChapterDOI
24 Sep 2018
TL;DR: It is suggested that these findings should be worked up as part of the efforts that are necessary in the Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences to articulate their assumptions, concepts and values related to information and knowledge use.
Abstract: Information seeking and use activities play an important role in completing the mandatory theses at Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences (UASs). The institution encounters issues related to value judgements between theoretical and practical knowledge. In this paper it is discussed how Bachelor theses are built at Finnish UASs in terms of information use events and related structures and processes. A qualitative multiple case study is reported. Data driven conceptualizations are supported by applying categories related to foundational system assumptions. The findings discussed are grouped into four themes. Some students expect predefined norms for using literary sources. Some encounter feelings of being alone with their topic, in other words, “finding” research gaps that do not exist. Insufficient knowledge about genre conventions and other situational factors can lead students to create textual solutions of their own. Different support and guidance approaches are required for each group. Information processes in theses and related problems can be based on different systemic assumptions. We suggest that these findings should be worked up as part of the efforts that are necessary in the Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences to articulate their assumptions, concepts and values related to information and knowledge use.

16 citations

28 Oct 2014
TL;DR: Jarjestyksessaan kuudes kansainvalinen QQML (Qualitative and Quantitative Methods in Libraries) -konferenssi jarjestettiin toukokuun viimeisella viikolla 2014 Istanbulin Kadir Has-yliopistossa Turkissa.
Abstract: Jarjestyksessaan kuudes kansainvalinen QQML (Qualitative and Quantitative Methods in Libraries) -konferenssi jarjestettiin toukokuun viimeisella viikolla 2014 Istanbulin Kadir Has-yliopistossa Turkissa. Esitelmien abstrakteja voi tarkastella osoitteessa: http://www.isast.org/images/NEO_932_917_923_921_922_927_BOOK_29.05.2014_e-book_version.pdf

1 citations

31 Dec 2013
TL;DR: Vuoden 2013 lokakuussa pidettiin ensimmainen ECIL-konferenssi (European Conference on Information Literacy) Istanbulissa, Turkissa.
Abstract: Vuoden 2013 lokakuussa pidettiin ensimmainen ECIL-konferenssi (European Conference on Information Literacy) Istanbulissa, Turkissa.

1 citations

Book ChapterDOI
19 Oct 2015
TL;DR: Discussing disturbances in thesis production processes that lead to anomalies in information use such as insufficient referencing and plagiarism in theses made in Finnish universities of applied sciences and the possible solutions are presented.
Abstract: This paper discusses disturbances in thesis production processes that lead to anomalies in information use such as insufficient referencing and plagiarism in theses made in Finnish universities of applied sciences. We develop discussion concerning systemic dynamics of these anomalies. Four different cases of information use which are the result of vague referencing or plagiarism, and the possible solutions are presented. The librarians’ role on the borderline between traditional intermediary positions and their potential for more interventionist ones are discussed. Librarians can contribute to the thesis production processes in which several cultures of information seeking and use meet and challenge each other. Thesis production and evaluation processes are not homogenous. Instead, elements of machine-like systems as well as those of individuals’ unique being-in-the-world contexts appear together forming colonies of information use practices that can ignore problems in references and information seeking or allow plagiarism.

1 citations


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01 Jan 2012

3,692 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: age of discontinuity guidelines to our changing society the age discontinuity guideline to the changing society as mentioned in this paper, and the guidelines to change the age of discontinuities in a changing society.
Abstract: age of discontinuity guidelines to our changing society the age of discontinuity guidelines to our changing society the age discontinuity guidelines to our changing society the age of discontinuity: guidelines to our changing the age discontinuity guidelines to our changing society the age discontinuity guidelines to our changing society the age discontinuity guidelines to our changing society the age of discontinuity guidelines to our changing the age of discontinuity guidelines to our changing the age of discontinuity the age of discontinuity cvpi world future society arizona chapter thinking about the a nixonian seer george washington university capturing the value of project management notes of a management watcher: discontinuity, discourse period of disruption and discontinuity in which the definition paper on success pletts a history of staffordshire oururl the importance of concepts of knowledge management and informat ion te chnologie s love and knowledgeracisms cure ufcgymmatthews visualization of the organizational network: the uai as an bioceramics world futures general evolution studies ebook the practice of management, 2012, 368 pages, peter drucker training circular tc 21 305 8 training program for medium graph it graph it blwood free download the age of discontinuity book just be nice blwood traveling through the boondocks: in and out of academic everyday math 6th grade answers guibot my second year as chief of staff ceyway at deaths door 1st edition zaraa cultural evolution conceptual challenges oururl

639 citations

01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: Borgman as discussed by the authors argues that data have no value or meaning in isolation; they exist within a knowledge infrastructure, an ecology of people, practices, technologies, institutions, material objects, and relationships.
Abstract: "Big Data" is on the covers of Science, Nature, the Economist, and Wired magazines, on the front pages of the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times. But despite the media hyperbole, as Christine Borgman points out in this examination of data and scholarly research, having the right data is usually better than having more data; little data can be just as valuable as big data. In many cases, there are no data -- because relevant data don't exist, cannot be found, or are not available. Moreover, data sharing is difficult, incentives to do so are minimal, and data practices vary widely across disciplines. Borgman, an often-cited authority on scholarly communication, argues that data have no value or meaning in isolation; they exist within a knowledge infrastructure -- an ecology of people, practices, technologies, institutions, material objects, and relationships. After laying out the premises of her investigation -- six "provocations" meant to inspire discussion about the uses of data in scholarship -- Borgman offers case studies of data practices in the sciences, the social sciences, and the humanities, and then considers the implications of her findings for scholarly practice and research policy. To manage and exploit data over the long term, Borgman argues, requires massive investment in knowledge infrastructures; at stake is the future of scholarship.

271 citations