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Juliet Thelma Pollard

Bio: Juliet Thelma Pollard is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Metis. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 29 citations.
Topics: Metis

Papers
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01 Jan 1990
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the emergence of the Metis Indians in the Pacific Northwest by tracing the growing up experiences of fur trade youngsters from infancy to old age, focusing on the children at Fort Vancouver, the Hudson's Bay Company headguarters for the region.
Abstract: If the p s y c h i a t r i s t ' s b e l i e f that childhood determines adult behaviour i s true, then h i s t o r i a n s should be able to ascertain much about the f a b r i c of past cultures by examining the way i n which children were raised. Indeed, i t may be argued that the roots of new cultures are to be found i n the growing up experiences of the f i r s t generation. Such i s the premise adopted i n t h i s thesis, which explores the emergence of the Metis i n the P a c i f i c Northwest by tr a c i n g the l i v e s of fur trade youngsters from c h i l d b i r t h to old age. S p e c i f i c a l l y , the study focuses on the children at Fort Vancouver, the Hudson's Bay Company headguarters for the region, during the f i r s t h a l f of the nineteenth century — a period of rapid s o c i a l change. While breaking new ground i n childhood h i s t o r y , the the s i s also provides a s o c i a l history of fur trade society west of the Rocky Mountains. Central to the study i s the conviction that the fur trade constituted a v i a b l e culture. While the parents i n t h i s culture came from a wide v a r i e t y of ethnic backgrounds, t h e i r mixed-blood youngsters were ra i s e d i n the wilderness' of Oregon i n a fusion of f ur trade capitalism, Euro-American ideology and native values — a mil i e u which forged and shaped t h e i r i d e n t i t i e s . This thesis advances the int e r p r e t a t i o n that, despite much v a r i a t i o n i n the children's growing up experience, most

29 citations


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290 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 1912-Nature
TL;DR: The most plausible form of this racial habit is one which even scientifically trained minds find it difficult to transcend as mentioned in this paper, the attitude of superiority consciously or unconsciously adopted by civilised men towards the semi-civilised, and among the civilised by the so-called Caucasian race.
Abstract: A FAMOUS psychological novelist has asserted that racial differences are irreducible, and that even when love unites two members of distinct races their life, however harmonious, is lived over a slumbering volcano of hate. There is a popular fallacy that racial antipathy is based on physiological foundations. But in so far as such antipathy is real, there is nothing physiological in its causation; and its emotional strength depends on the law that the more automatic and unconscious a habit is, the greater is the displeasure felt and the disgust aroused by infractions of the habit. The most plausible form of this racial habit is one which even scientifically trained minds find it difficult to transcend. This is the attitude of superiority consciously or unconsciously adopted by civilised men towards the semi-civilised, and among the civilised by the so-called Caucasian race. As Prof. Boas puts it, “Proud of his wonderful achievements civilised man looks down upon the humbler members of mankind.” The European looks down on the civilised Oriental. The point of interest, however, is that be claims to be of a higher type, possibly physical, but certainly psychical, on the assumption that achievement depends solely upon aptitude for achievement. The Mind of Primitive Man. By Franz Boas. A Course of Lectures delivered before the Lowell Institute, Boston, Mass., and the National University of Mexico, 1910–11. Pp. xi + 294. (New York: The Macmillan Co.; London: Macmillan and Co., Ltd., 1911.) Price 6s. 6d. net.

283 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: This book contains discussions of Neuroendocrine regulation of a number of tissues and processes including endocrine glands, ecdysis, pupation, and diapause, and the biochemical changes in cuticular proteins.
Abstract: posium in his honor should cover a wide variety of topics in insect biochemistry and physiology. Therefore, this book contains two major sections. The first (Symposium on Insect Endocrinology) includes discussions of (1) Neuroendocrine regulation of a number of tissues and processes including endocrine glands, ecdysis, pupation, and diapause; (2) developmental response to juvenile hormone; and (3) the biochemical changes in cuticular proteins. The second section (Symposium on Insect Nutrition) is composed of papers exploring characterization of insect digestive enzymes, lipid and carbohydrate requirements, dietary modulation of NADP enzymes, measurement techniques in food utilization, and the complexities of the dietetic interaction of insects and plants. In the chapters on these subjects, the authors present unpublished results of ongoing research, so the book is of particular interest to those involved in biochemical research in entomology, endocrinology, nutrition, physiology, embryology, and cell biology.

77 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Indian Man examines the life of James Mooney (1861-1921), the son of poor Irish immigrants who became a champion of Native peoples and one of the most influential anthropology fieldworkers of all time as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The Indian Man examines the life of James Mooney (1861-1921), the son of poor Irish immigrants who became a champion of Native peoples and one of the most influential anthropology fieldworkers of all time. As a staff member of the Smithsonian Institution for over three decades, Mooney conducted fieldwork and gathered invaluable information on rapidly changing Native American cultures across the continent. His fieldwork among the Eastern Cherokees, Cheyennes, and Kiowas provides priceless snapshots of their traditional ways of life, and his sophisticated and sympathetic analysis of the 1890 Ghost Dance and the consequent tragedy at Wounded Knee has not been surpassed a century later. L. G. Moses is a professor of history at Oklahoma State University. He is the author of Wild West Shows and the Images of American Indians, 1833-1933.

43 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

42 citations