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Jutta Gossmann

Bio: Jutta Gossmann is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Supply chain & Water use. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 1 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
17 Mar 2020-Water
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present the first complete organizational water scarcity footprint case study carried out for Neoperl GmbH, a German company that offers innovative solutions regarding drinking water for the plumbing industry.
Abstract: With water scarcity representing an increasing threat to humans, the environment and the economy, companies are interested in exploring how their operations and supply chains affect water resources globally. To allow for systematically compiling the water footprint at the company level, the organizational water footprint method based on ISO 14046 and ISO/TS 14072 was developed. This paper presents the first complete organizational water scarcity footprint case study carried out for Neoperl GmbH, a German company that offers innovative solutions regarding drinking water for the plumbing industry. The cradle-to-gate assessment for one year includes, besides facility-based production activities, purchased materials, electricity and fuels, and supporting activities, such as company vehicles and infrastructure. Neoperl’s total freshwater consumption amounts to approximately 110,000 m3, 96% thereof being attributable to the supply chain, with freshwater consumption through purchased metals playing the predominant role. Metals (mainly stainless steel and brass) are major hotspots, also when considering the water scarcity-related local impacts resulting from freshwater consumption, which mainly affect China and Chile. These results can be used to improve the company’s supply chain water use in cooperation with internal and external stakeholders by means of, e.g., sustainable purchase strategies or eco-design options to substitute water intensive materials.

5 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , a systematic review of literature on the intersection of supply chain collaboration and sustainable development is presented to understand how SCC can contribute to the achievement of broader sustainable development goals (SDGs).
Abstract: The global push towards sustainable development has led to an upsurge in academic literature at the juncture of supply chain collaboration (SCC) and sustainability. The present paper aims to map this growing literature to understand how SCC can contribute to the achievement of broader Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Via a systematic review of literature (SLR), the paper maps key themes at the intersection of SCC and sustainable development. Relying on nine key themes, the study presents novel insights into the domain of SCC for sustainable development. The results of the SLR reveal that collaborative innovation, collaborative process and product development are key mechanisms driving SCC. However, the extant literature has not devoted much attention to the effectiveness of SCC mechanisms or their performance. Further, the current study posits that more effective SCC strategies can boost the sustainable operational performance of the supply chain (SC) by enhancing capacity building and resource utilisation. Based on the contingency approach, this study offers a novel framework linking SCC to SDGs. The study thus has the potential to help managers and practitioners identify strategic fields of action for achieving SDGs.

22 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an organizational life cycle assessment (OLCA) method was applied to a service providing SME in the photovoltaic and wind energy business in the United Kingdom.
Abstract: Companies are increasingly interested in reducing their environmental footprint. Thereby, they face the challenge of identifying and mitigating their specific impacts and hotspots and simultaneously avoid burden shifting. The organizational life cycle assessment (OLCA) method was conceived and successfully tested for the assessment if companies’ potential environmental impacts. Still, the method poses methodological challenges for the application to service providing organizations. In this paper, OLCA was applied to a service providing SME in the photovoltaic and wind energy business in the United Kingdom. The environmental impact profile of the reporting organization is dominated by transport activities, including the technicians’ trips to the solar farms, employee commuting, and business travels. According to the main goals of the study (gaining insights in internal operations and improving organizational procedures), recommendations to reduce travel-related impacts are provided. For existing methodological challenges like selecting the reporting flow and setting the system boundaries, innovative solutions like defining multiple reporting flows for different activities and to partly include service receiving objects in system boundaries are discussed with the aim to facilitate future applications.

12 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , a systematic review and bibliometric analysis of the OLCSA in University is presented, and the results show that there is no specific study that has found or assessed the LCSA of an organization.
Abstract: Life cycle sustainability assessment (LCSA) is an approach utilized for products to analyze their sustainability indicators. However, no definite study has determined the sustainability of an organization using the LCA approach. This review focuses on a systematic review and bibliometric analysis of the OLCSA in University. The literature was searched in the Scopus online database considering PRISMA guidelines, and VOSviewer software was used for three types of bibliometric analysis, i.e., co-authorship, co-occurrence, and co-citation were analyzed with their units of analysis. The results show that there is no specific study that has found or assessed the LCSA of an organization. However, 17 articles on O-LCA and 2 on SO-LCA were found, and there were numerous articles available about ELCC in the literature. Researchers mostly used UNEP guidelines for O-LCA, in line with ISO standards. However, they used NPV for E-LCC. Based on VOSviewer software, Matthias Finkbeiner, Forin, Martínez-Blanco Julia, Berger Markus, Lehman, Loss, Manzardo, Scipion, Hall, and Weldu are co-authors. The keyword of “life cycle” was broadly used, and the most cited source was the “International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment”. Adoption of the LCSA framework is recommended for O-LCSA studies to estimate organizations’ sustainability, and to ensure quality education contributing the fourth SDGs.

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , a mixed-integer linear programming model is proposed to minimize the operational costs under a water footprint cap in a wine supply chain network by selecting the optimal suppliers (vine growers), manufacturing sites (winemakers), and transportation modes (fuel-powered trucks).
Abstract: As agriculture and industry exploit more than 90% of the global freshwater resources, water overuse and degradation have emerged as critical socio-environmental challenges for both nations and corporations. In this context, the water footprint concept was introduced in order to quantify the freshwater consumption and pollution of a territory or across a product’s life cycle. As research on water management in supply chains is growing, this work aims to integrate the perspective of freshwater resources into supply network configuration. Focusing on the agrifood sector, we have developed a mixed-integer linear programming model that can be used to minimize the operational costs under a water footprint cap in a wine supply chain network by selecting the optimal suppliers (vine growers), manufacturing sites (winemakers), and transportation modes (fuel-powered trucks). The optimization outcomes unveil that the wine network’s configurations (structure and fuel type) vary significantly depending on the values of the water footprint cap so as to balance the trade-off between economic and water-related environmental efficiency. Beyond the viticulture sector, the proposed model is anticipated to act as a paradigm for setting joint sustainable targets or caps to limit water use across supply chains.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , an improved approach integrating water quantity and quality into a single indicator was proposed for water footprint assessment, and the results revealed that the comprehensive assessment indicator of water footprint (CAI wf ) of Zhejiang textile industry decreased more than 20% from 2008 to 2018.
Abstract: Water footprint is an indicator to quantify the potential environmental impacts related to water. Current methods for the water footprint assessment can only obtain the results which are typically reported as a profile of impact category indicator results. Due to the diverse and incomparable results, the demand for a single indicator for water footprint assessment is highlighted in recent years. In this paper, an improved approach integrating water quantity and quality into a single indicator was proposed for water footprint assessment. Then, a case study for water footprint assessment of Zhejiang’s textile industry was analyzed with this approach. The results revealed that the comprehensive assessment indicator of water footprint (CAI wf ) of Zhejiang’s textile industry decreased more than 20% from 2008 to 2018. CAI wf and endpoint indicator of water footprint (WF end ) obtained with volumetric water footprint approach depicted similar tendencies to the CAI wf and WF end obtained with impact-oriented water footprint approach. Among the three sub-sectors of Zhejiang’s textile industry, the CAI wf of textile manufacture sector was the largest, followed by chemical fiber manufacture sector and clothing manufacture sector.