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Jyoti Kumar Sharma

Bio: Jyoti Kumar Sharma is an academic researcher from Shiv Nadar University. The author has contributed to research in topic(s): Melampsora & Blight. The author has an hindex of 17, co-authored 70 publication(s) receiving 939 citation(s). Previous affiliations of Jyoti Kumar Sharma include Indian Veterinary Research Institute & Australian National University.

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Topics: Melampsora, Blight, Cylindrocladium ...read more
Papers
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01 Jan 1985-
TL;DR: During the disease survey in Tectona grandis, Bombax ceiba, Ailanthus triphysa, Gmelina arborea, Dalbergia latifolia, Ochroma pyramidale and Eucalyptus spp.

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Abstract: During the disease survey in Tectona grandis, Bombax ceiba, Ailanthus triphysa, Gmelina arborea. Dalbergia latifolia, Ochroma pyramidale and Eucalyptus spp. a total of 65 pathogenic and 13 other diseases (unknown etiology, non-infectious and phanerogamic parasite) were recorded. With these diseases altogether 88 pathogens were associated, of which 64 are new host record, including seven new species viz. Pseudoepicoccum tectonae and Phoinopsis variosporum on T, grandis, Meliola ailan thii on A . triphysa, Griphospharria gmelinae on G. arborca, Physalospora dalbergiae on D. latifolia and Cytospora eucalypti and Valsa eucalypticola on Eucalyptus spp., while 29 are first record from India, T. grandis had fifteen diseases, two in nursery and fourteen in plantations; one being common to both. Ten organisms were associated with these diseases; mostly causing foliar damage; six pathogens are new host record and four first record from India. None of the two diseases in nurseries were serious whereas in plantations die -back caused by insect-fungus complex and a phanerogamic parasite, Dendrophthoe falcata were serious diseases capable of causing large-scale destruction. Three diseases viz. pink disease (Corticium salmonicolor), Phomopsis leaf spot and a disease of unknown etiology appeared to have potential to become serious. In B. ceiba there were eight diseases, four in nursery and six in plantations; two were common to both. Four pathogens are new host record. Collar rot and seedling blight were the severe diseases causing appreciable loss to stocking. None of the plantation diseases were found to be serious, except Myrothecium leaf spot which in certain humid areas could pose some problem due to extensive premature defoliation. A . triphysa had a total of nine diseases of which eight were in nursery and four in plantations; three were common to both. All the eight pathogens are new host record while two were first record from India. Among relatively large number of seedling diseases, two viz. collar rot and seedling blight were very widespread and damaging as they resulted in large-scale mortality. In plantations though none of the diseases were very serious, three viz. Botryodiplodia stem canker, pink disease and shot-hole were potentially serious, especially the former two, which killed the affected trees in certain localities. There were ten diseases in G. arborea, three in nursery and eight in plantations; one was common to both. All the ten pathogens associated with these diseases are new 2 host record while three are recorded for the first time from India. In nurseries onlv seedling blight was of serious consequences though stem infection (Phoma nebulosa) also appeared to be potentially serious in certain localities. In plantations a die-back disease caused by Griphosphaeria gmelinue was the major disease as it resulted in heavy mortality. In D . latifolia none of the four diseases of foliage recorded were of serious nature. Leaf spots caused by Physalospora and Colletotrichum are new diseases while for leaf rust and Phyllachora leaf spot D. latifolia is a new host. Only two diseases were recorded in plantations of 0. pyrumidale and none in the nursery. One of the diseases, die-back, resulting in large-scale mortality, was caused by two pathogens, Calonectria rigidiuscula and Fusarium moniliforme, the former being the first record from India. Eucalyptus spp, recorded the highest number of 30 diseases, 13 in nursery and 21 in plantations; four were common to both. Of the 46 pathogens associated with these diseases, 30 are new host record and 18 first record for India. In nurseries, damping-off, seedling blight and leaf and shoot blights were serious seedling diseases affecting the nursery stock considerably, especially in high rainfall areas. In plantations, pink disease and leaf and shoot blights (Cylindrocladium spp.) were the major limiting factors during the first one to three years of establishment. A number of provenances of various species of Eucalyptus screened against pink disease following toxin bio-assay revealed variation in susceptibility between species and within provenances of a species. Other potentially serious diseases were web blight (Rhizoctonia solani) in nursery and stem cankers caused by Cryphonectria cubensis and Cytospora eucalypticola (both recorded for the first time from India), which can result in heavy mortality. Control measures for 18 seedling diseases of various tree species were worked out and field tested for the efficacy of the fungicide and its dosage.

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84 citations


MonographDOI
04 Mar 2000-
TL;DR: This manual provides methods for the development and evaluation of criteria and indicators (C&I) which can then be used to assess the sustainability of forest management, especially in the tropics.

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Abstract: This manual provides methods for the development and evaluation of criteria and indicators (C&I) which can then be used to assess the sustainability of forest management. The manual is written primarily for researchers, people or groups interested in evaluating C&I for assessments of forests in new areas, or as a reference for readers wanting to know how CIFOR's Generic Template was produced. The methods presented are aimed at the development of sets of C&I for natural forest at the forest management unit level, especially in the tropics. Following an introductory chapter focusing on the overall purpose, specific objectives, and the C&I development process, three chapters explain how to prepare for C&I testing, how to conduct a test, and how to analyse the results. Subsequent chapters explain the conceptual basis of C&I development, with three case studies offered as examples, and suggested additional reading materials. Specific forms and tools that have been used in the course of CIFOR's testing are also presented, with examples of ways to present the results. The final chapter provides possible baseline sets of C&I, available to users for evaluation and testing in their own contexts.

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79 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Cryphonectria cubensis, recorded for the first time in India, is responsible for causing severe stem cankers in Eucalyptus grandis in Kerala.

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Abstract: SUMMARY Cryphonectria cubensis, recorded for the first time in India, is responsible for causing severe stem cankers in Eucalyptus grandis in Kerala. Disease outbreaks are localised and vary in severity with host species, at times affecting up to 30% of the trees in a stand. Infection usually occurs on the main stem 1 to 1 ·5 m above ground and occasionally near ground level. There is evidence of tree to tree spread of the disease from the primary infection foci. The disease also affects coppicing by stumps after harvest. Details on the incidence and epidemiology of the disease are presented.

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51 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
01 May 1984-Forest Pathology
TL;DR: Survey of Eucalyptus nurseries in Kerala State indicates that the most prevalent diseases are damping-off, web blight and seedling blight in seedbeds and stem canker, leaf and shoot blights and Phaeoseptoria leaf spot in container plants.

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Abstract: Survey of Eucalyptus (E, grandis and E. tereticornis) nurseries in Kerala State indicates that the most prevalent diseases are damping-off, web blight and seedling blight in seedbeds and stem canker, leaf and shoot blights and Phaeoseptoria leaf spot in container plants. Cylindrocladium spp., Rbizoctonia solani and Pythium spp. arc the main serious pathogens. Pythium myriotylum, P. deliense, R. scilani, Cylindrocladium camellias, C. clavatum and Sclerotium rolfsii are recorded for the first time on Eucalyptus.

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47 citations


Cited by
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01 Jan 1944-
TL;DR: The only previously known species of Myrsidea from bulbuls, M. warwicki ex Ixos philippinus, is redescribed and sixteen new species are described; they and their type hosts are described.

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Abstract: We redescribe the only previously known species of Myrsidea from bulbuls, M. pycnonoti Eichler. Sixteen new species are described; they and their type hosts are: M. phillipsi ex Pycnonotus goiavier goiavier (Scopoli), M. gieferi ex P. goiavier suluensis Mearns, M. kulpai ex P. flavescens Blyth, M. finlaysoni ex P. finlaysoni Strickland, M. kathleenae ex P. cafer (L.), M. warwicki ex Ixos philippinus (J. R. Forster), M. mcclurei ex Microscelis amaurotis (Temminck), M. zeylanici ex P. zeylanicus (Gmelin), M. plumosi ex P. plumosus Blyth, M. eutiloti ex P. eutilotus (Jardine and Selby), M. adamsae ex P. urostictus (Salvadori), M. ochracei ex Criniger ochraceus F. Moore, M. borbonici ex Hypsipetes borbonicus (J. R. Forster), M. johnsoni ex P. atriceps (Temminck), M. palmai ex C. ochraceus, and M. claytoni ex P. eutilotus. A key is provided for the identification of these 17 species.

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1,573 citations


Book
02 Jan 1991-

1,339 citations


Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 1989-

320 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Peter Willadsen1Institutions (1)
01 Oct 2004-Parasitology
TL;DR: There is now abundant evidence that vaccination with defined protein antigens is able to induce significant immunity to tick infestation, but under most circumstances the use of a tick vaccine as the single, stand alone control technology is likely to require more efficacious vaccines than those currently available.

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Abstract: There is now abundant evidence that vaccination with defined protein antigens is able to induce significant immunity to tick infestation. In a limited number of cases, this immunity has been duplicated by vaccination with recombinant antigens, a critical step on the pathway to commercial vaccine production. The existence of two commercial vaccines has allowed a number of field studies showing that the existing products can make an important contribution to an integrated approach to the control of ticks in the field. Under most circumstances however, the use of a tick vaccine as the single, stand alone control technology is likely to require more efficacious vaccines than those currently available. Increases in efficacy are most likely to come through the discovery of additional, effective vaccine antigens. The number of antigens with demonstrated effect is increasing, though only slowly, while the number of potential antigens that remain to be evaluated is increasing more quickly. There is limited, though convincing, evidence that some of these antigens will show effective cross-species protection, though in a poorly understood and unpredictable way. The groundwork has been laid; the potential of the field is still to be effectively exploited.

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280 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
K. C. Jisha1, K. Vijayakumari1, Jos T. Puthur1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: The main objective of this review is to provide an overview of various crops in which seed priming is practiced and about various seed-priming methods and its effects.

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Abstract: Plants are exposed to any number of potentially adverse environmental conditions such as water deficit, high salinity, extreme temperature, submergence, etc. These abiotic stresses adversely affect the plant growth and productivity. Nowadays various strategies are employed to generate plants that can withstand these stresses. In recent years, seed priming has been developed as an indispensable method to produce tolerant plants against various stresses. Seed priming is the induction of a particular physiological state in plants by the treatment of natural and synthetic compounds to the seeds before germination. In plant defense, priming is defined as a physiological process by which a plant prepares to respond to imminent abiotic stress more quickly or aggressively. Moreover, plants raised from primed seeds showed sturdy and quick cellular defense response against abiotic stresses. Priming for enhanced resistance to abiotic stress obviously is operating via various pathways involved in different metabolic processes. The seedlings emerging from primed seeds showed early and uniform germination. Moreover, the overall growth of plants is enhanced due to the seed-priming treatments. The main objective of this review is to provide an overview of various crops in which seed priming is practiced and about various seed-priming methods and its effects.

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268 citations


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Performance
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Author's H-index: 17

No. of papers from the Author in previous years
YearPapers
20211
20203
20192
20161
20151
20142

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Author's top 5 most impactful journals

Forest Pathology

18 papers, 236 citations

Australian Forestry

2 papers, 23 citations

Forest Ecology and Management

2 papers, 14 citations