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Jyri Hanski

Bio: Jyri Hanski is an academic researcher from VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. The author has contributed to research in topics: Asset management & Service (business). The author has an hindex of 7, co-authored 35 publications receiving 254 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a framework of drivers and barriers for circular economy is introduced, including seven distinct areas: environmental, economic, social, political and institutional, technological and informational, supply chain, and organizational factors.

307 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2019
TL;DR: The steps that characterize the transformation and the possible business impacts this transformation generates are discussed and the framework could be used for similar analysis with comparable data and to help to understand the ongoing transition in business ecosystems.
Abstract: Digitalization and the industrial internet is expected to bring major changes in manufacturing and service delivery—following the transformation in business to consumer markets. The industrial internet enables new business by connecting intelligent devices and people using them into cloud based analytics and decision-making systems. The objective of this research was to understand the transformation from an asset provider to a knowledge service company by analysing companies’ service offerings. ‘Data to decision’—framework is used to categorize service concepts according to their knowledge intensity. The framework suggests that the service provider could offer new value to its customers by being able to provide knowledge as a service. In this paper, we discuss shortly the steps that characterize the transformation and the possible business impacts this transformation generates. Additionally, we connect the steps into the framework to help further research in this field. For further research, we suggest that the framework could be used for similar analysis with comparable data and to help to understand the ongoing transition in business ecosystems.

29 citations

01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: In this paper, the MaintenanceKIBS project has developed tools and practices for concurrent design of product and service, for managing and utilizing information gathered in different planning phases and for assessing the life cycle costs and profitability of the alternative product-service-concepts.
Abstract: Many manufacturing companies are considering the opportunities which industrial services can offer them along their core products. The development of services offers the companies new growth opportunities. The growth of technology-based knowledge-intensive business services (KIBS) has been enabled by outsourcing and globalisation, for instance. Moreover, the profitability of services is usually higher than the profitability of the other industrial businesses, and they offer profits throughout the entire life cycle of the product. The development of integrated product-service solutions is not without challenges. Product and service design are typically accomplished separately in different organization units. Technical personnel are responsible for the development of physical products while service planning is made by the marketing organization. Consequently services are generally planned afterwards, causing problems in the compatibility of products and services. Moreover, in many cases too little attention has been paid to the business analysis of product-service systems (PSS), for example, life cycle profit evaluation or revenue logic assessment of alternative product-service systems. In manufacturing companies, the processes related to the development of products are usually systematic, but the service development is intuitive and disconnected from the product development processes. However, the services offered and developed should be compatible with the existing product and service portfolio. Customers increasingly demand solutions from their suppliers that are comprehensive and fulfil the customer needs. The development of product-service design processes enables the companies to design solutions consisting of the best possible combination of products and services from the perspective of the customer and the supplier. The adoption of PSS design helps the companies to take the services into account when developing products and vice versa. With the help of the new PSS design methods the lead-times of the development processes may be shortened, and better quality solutions achieved when the specific characteristics of the products and services can be taken into account as early as possible. The goal of the MaintenanceKIBS project is to develop methods for knowledgeintensive service and product design. For instance, we provide tools and practices for concurrent design of product and service, for managing and utilizing information gathered in different planning phases and for assessing the life cycle costs and profitability of the alternative product-service-concepts.

17 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: In this paper, a framework for capturing the customer ideas is presented based on customer observation methodology, entrepreneurial opportunity recognition model, front end of innovation literature as well as the experiences of a case study and interviews.
Abstract: The importance of maintaining close contact with customers and utilizing customer-based information has been emphasized in the industrial service and product-service systems (PSS) literature A profound understanding of the customer’s business and production environment is needed for successful PSS development The conventional methods for gathering information about customers (surveys, feedback and interviews) typically result in incremental improvements and information about existing products and services The focus of this paper is on how the information and ideas from customer contacts can be better captured to enable radical improvements A framework for capturing the customer ideas is presented The framework is based on customer observation methodology, entrepreneurial opportunity recognition model, front end of innovation literature as well as the experiences of a case study and interviews

14 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a growing market for aging-related tech companies has been identified, which has resulted in major consequences and implications in the economic, social, and political fields of the world.
Abstract: Changes in global demographics have resulted in major consequences and implications in the economic, social, and political fields. These changes have created a growing market for aging-related tech...

9 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Jan 1995
TL;DR: In this article, Nonaka and Takeuchi argue that Japanese firms are successful precisely because they are innovative, because they create new knowledge and use it to produce successful products and technologies, and they reveal how Japanese companies translate tacit to explicit knowledge.
Abstract: How has Japan become a major economic power, a world leader in the automotive and electronics industries? What is the secret of their success? The consensus has been that, though the Japanese are not particularly innovative, they are exceptionally skilful at imitation, at improving products that already exist. But now two leading Japanese business experts, Ikujiro Nonaka and Hiro Takeuchi, turn this conventional wisdom on its head: Japanese firms are successful, they contend, precisely because they are innovative, because they create new knowledge and use it to produce successful products and technologies. Examining case studies drawn from such firms as Honda, Canon, Matsushita, NEC, 3M, GE, and the U.S. Marines, this book reveals how Japanese companies translate tacit to explicit knowledge and use it to produce new processes, products, and services.

7,448 citations

Journal Article

1,306 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a comprehensive overview of barriers for adopting blockchain technology to manage sustainable supply chains is provided using technology, organizational, and environmental framework followed by inputs from academics and industry experts and then analyzed using the Decision-Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL).

472 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a comprehensive framework bringing together the emerging trends of servitization and digitalization in one conceptual structure, where they show how companies can combine digital systems with product-service systems (PSS) to harvest value and build competitive advantage.
Abstract: The term servitization has been used in recent years to describe a growing service orientation among product manufacturers, who are increasingly moving from simply selling products to offering supportive services tailored to the product (Baines et al. 2009; Wise and Baumgartner 1999; Vandermerwe and Rada 1988). These services range from traditional product-related services such as maintenance, repair, and training to advanced customer-oriented services (Lay 2014; Oliva and Kallenberg 2003; Mathieu 2001). Advanced services typically take the form of product-service systems (PSS), or physical products bundled with intangible services in a customized manner to fulfill highly individual customer needs (Tukker and Tischner 2006; Goedkoop et al. 1999). These innovative, individualized product-service bundles increase the value delivered to the customer and hence increase the competitiveness of the provider (Boyt and Harvey 1997). The move toward servitization has coincided with a rising trend toward digitalization, with manufacturers equipping products with intelligent digital systems that allow the products to operate independently of human intervention and communicate with other machines. As a logical consequence of the confluence of servitization with this trend toward intelligent machines, an increasing number of manufacturers are using digital systems to support their services (Minister and Meiren 2011), creating totally new industrial product-service offerings, such as comprehensive remote services that bring digital and physical systems together to pave the way for, for instance, availability guarantees. These new kinds of offerings may in turn lead to far-reaching reconfigurations of the mechanisms of value creation in manufacturing. Thus, manufacturers cannot afford to ignore these emerging forces, which have the power to completely reshape the industrial landscape. Companies that do not keep up with these developments may find themselves threatened with extinction in the near future, as competitors with more customized, responsive offerings gain advantage. Three practical case studies from our joint research projects on servitization show how companies can combine digital systems with PSS to harvest value and build competitive advantage. Services Innovation and Digitalization Previous studies of servitization have assumed that manufacturers move from product manufacturer to solution provider along a defined transformation path (Gebauer, Fleisch, and Friedli 2005; Gebauer 2004). This transition path is typically described as taking place in stages, with each stage offering different potentials for differentiation (see, for example, Matthyssens and Vandenbempt 2010; Gebauer, Bravo-Sanchez, and Fleisch 2008; Matthyssens and Vandenbempt 2008; Penttinen and Palmer 2007; Oliva and Kallenberg 2003; More 2001). At the end of the path, manufacturers offer innovative PSS, such as availability guarantees or build-operate-transfer (BOT) models, which increase customer value on the one hand and create competitive advantage for the provider on the other (Brady, Davies, and Gann 2005; Boyt and Harvey 1997). While PSS have been widely discussed--see Velamuri, Neyer, and Moslein (2011) for a review of the literature--the effect of the digital revolution on this servitization pathway has been less well explored. Most articles have dealt with the new challenges and impacts of digitalized services, focusing on how they differ from more traditional product-related services. What is missing in the literature is a comprehensive framework bringing together the emerging trends of servitization and digitalization in one conceptual structure. The integration of digitalization with services innovation has important implications for services. For instance, because digital services can be provided independent of manufacturer and customer location, traditional service characteristics like perishability and inseparability do not apply to digital service creation (Holtbriigge, Holzmuller, and von Wangenheim 2007). …

235 citations