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K.A. Bartels

Bio: K.A. Bartels is an academic researcher from Southwest Research Institute. The author has contributed to research in topics: Instrumentation (computer programming) & Condition monitoring. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 183 citations.

Papers
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TL;DR: A description is given of its various scientific and engineering applications, including the study of wave dispersion in structures, global and long-range inspection of steel pipes and tubes, condition monitoring of machinery such as combustion engines, and onboard sensing of crash events for vehicle safety system operations.

193 citations


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Abstract: In this paper we review the state of the art in an emerging new technology: embedded ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation (NDE). Embedded ultrasonic NDE permits active structural health monitoring, i.e. the on-demand interrogation of the structure to determine its current state of structural health. The enabling element of embedded ultrasonic NDE is the piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS). We begin by reviewing the guided wave theory in plate, tube, and shell structures, with special attention to Lamb waves. The mechanisms of Lamb wave excitation and detection with embeddable PWAS transducers is presented. It is shown analytically and verified experimentally that Lamb wave mode tuning can be achieved by the judicious combination of PWAS dimensions, frequency value, and Lamb mode characteristics. Subsequently, we address in turn the use of pitch-catch, pulse-echo, and phased array ultrasonic methods for Lambwave damage detection. In each case, the conventional ultrasonic NDE results are contrasted with embedded NDE results. Detection of cracks, disbonds, delaminations, and diffuse damage in metallic and composite structures are exemplified. Other techniques, such as the time reversal method and the migration technique, are also presented. The paper ends with conclusions and suggestions for further work.

243 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A variety of state-of-the-art MPT configurations and their applications will be reviewed along with the working principle of this transducer type.

200 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a simplified acoustoelastic formulation of the Pochhammer-Chree vibrations in cylindrical waveguides is derived in the framework of the partial wave representation for guided waves.
Abstract: Health monitoring of steel strands is the subject of much research in the nondestructive evaluation and civil engineering communities. This paper deals with a guided stress wave method for stress monitoring and defect detection in seven-wire strands. A simplified acoustoelastic formulation of the Pochhammer-Chree vibrations in cylindrical waveguides is derived in the framework of the partial wave representation for guided waves. Magnetostrictive transducers are used to excite and detect the waves in the experiments. Results from acoustoelastic measurements on single wires and on strands are presented, showing the feasibility of the method for stress measurement, although an anomalous behavior of the strands at low stress levels remains the subject of current investigation. Improvements to the inherently low sensitivity of acoustoelastic stress measurements are suggested by adding the effect of strand elongation. The role of the strand anchorages is also examined in the context of wave attenuation. Finally, the suitability of the guided wave method for the detection of indentations and broken wires in the strands is demonstrated, including the possibility of inspecting the critical anchored regions.

156 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A finite element model of the elementary transducers has been developed and shows that magnetostrictive EMATs directly applied on mild steel plates have comparatively poor performance that is dependent on the precise magneto-mechanical properties of the test object.
Abstract: Guided wave inspection has proven to be a very effective method for the rapid inspection of large structures. The fundamental shear horizontal (SH) wave mode in plates and the torsional mode in pipe-like structures are especially useful because of their non-dispersive character. Guided waves can be generated by either piezoelectric transducers or electro- magnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs), and EMATs can be based on either the Lorentz force or magnetostriction. Several EMAT configurations can be used to produce SH waves, the most common being Lorentz-force periodic permanent magnet and magnetostrictive EMATs, the latter being directly applied on the sample or with a bonded strip of highly magnetostrictive material on the plate. This paper compares the performance of these solutions on steel structures. To quantitatively assess the wave amplitude produced by different probes, a finite element model of the elementary transducers has been developed. The results of the model are experimentally validated and the simulations are further used to study the dependence of ultrasonic wave amplitude on key design parameters. The analysis shows that magnetostrictive EMATs directly applied on mild steel plates have comparatively poor performance that is dependent on the precise magneto-mechanical properties of the test object. Periodic permanent magnet EMATs generate intermediate wave amplitudes and are noncontact and insensitive to the variations in properties seen across typical steels. Large signal amplitudes can be achieved with magnetostrictive EMATs with a layer of highly magnetostrictive material attached between the transducer and the plate, but this compromises the noncontact nature of the transducer.

149 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the application of smart materials/sensors for the structural health monitoring (SHM) of civil engineering structures is critically reviewed, where the major focus is on the evaluations of laboratory and field studies.
Abstract: Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) aims to develop automated systems for the continuous monitoring, inspection, and damage detection of structures with minimum labour involvement. The first step to set up a SHM system is to incorporate a level of structural sensing capability that is reliable and possesses long term stability. Smart sensing technologies including the applications of fibre optic sensors, piezoelectric sensors, magnetostrictive sensors and self-diagnosing fibre reinforced composites, possess very important capabilities of monitoring various physical or chemical parameters related to the health and therefore, durable service life of structures. In particular, piezoelectric sensors and magnetorestrictive sensors can serve as both sensors and actuators, which make SHM to be an active monitoring system. Thus, smart sensing technologies are now currently available, and can be utilized to the SHM of civil engineering structures. In this paper, the application of smart materials/sensors for the SHM of civil engineering structures is critically reviewed. The major focus is on the evaluations of laboratory and field studies of smart materials/sensors in civil engineering structures.

110 citations