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K.A. Bhaskaran

Bio: K.A. Bhaskaran is an academic researcher from Indian Institute of Technology Madras. The author has contributed to research in topics: Rocket engine nozzle & Rocket. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 57 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a straight cylindrical supersonic exhaust diffusers (SED) using cold nitrogen and hot rocket exhaust gases as driving fluids were used to evaluate the effects of the ratios of the SED area to rocket nozzle throat area (Ad/At), SED areas to rocket exhaust manifold exit area, SED length to its diameter (L/D), and specific heat ratio of the driving gases (k) on the minimum starting pressure ratio, (Po/Pa)st, of SED.

64 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the starting transient and plume blowback at diffuser breakdown of a straight cylindrical supersonic exhaust diffuser with no externally supplied secondary flow are numerically investigated.

36 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors deal with the high-altitude simulation and testing of upper stage rocket motors with large nozzle area ratios, using second-throat exhaust diffusers (STED).
Abstract: This paper deals with the high-altitude simulation and testing of upper stage rocket motors with large-nozzle area ratios, using second-throat exhaust diffusers (STED). To evaluate the performance ...

32 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
15 Oct 2018-Energy
TL;DR: In this article, a low area ratio rectangular supersonic gaseous ejector is subjected to parametric evaluation to calculate the performance parameters like stagnation pressure ratio, compression ratio, entrainment ratio and the mixing parameter known as non-mixed length.

28 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the design and operational parameters of rocket exhaust diffusers equipped to simulate high-altitude rocket performance on the ground were investigated and characterized using a comprehensive approach (theoretical, numerical, and experimental).
Abstract: The design and operational parameters of rocket exhaust diffusers equipped to simulate high-altitude rocket performance on the ground were investigated and characterized using a comprehensive approach (theoretical, numerical, and experimental). The physical model of concern includes a rocket motor, a vacuum chamber, and a diffuser, which have axisymmetric configurations. Further, the operational characteristics of a rocket exhaust diffuserwereanalyzed froma flowdevelopmentpointof view.Emphasiswasplacedondetailed flowstructure inthe diffuser, to observe the pressure oscillation in both the vacuum chamber and diffuser, which determines the minimum rocket-motor pressure required to start the diffuser. Numerical simulations were compared with experimental data on startup and in operational conditions to understand the effects of major design parameters, including the area ratio of diffuser to rocket-motor nozzle throat, the rocket-motor pressure, and the vacuumchamber size. Nomenclature Ad = inner cross-sectional area of diffuser Ade = exit cross-sectional area of diffuser Ae = exit cross-sectional area of rocket nozzle At = throat cross-sectional area of rocket nozzle

27 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, an experimental investigation was conducted to study the Reynolds number influence on dual-bell transition behavior for tests inside a high-altitude simulation chamber, where the authors found that the width of the inflection region decreases with an increase in the nozzle Reynolds number.
Abstract: An experimental investigation was conducted to study the Reynolds number influence on dual-bell transition behavior for tests inside a high-altitude simulation chamber. For the range of nozzle supply pressures tested, the nozzle Reynolds number is seen to gradually decrease from a relatively high value (of the order of 107 for tests in sea-level atmospheric conditions) toward the transitional range (lower side of 106 for tests inside the high-altitude chamber). This influences the width of the inflection region, which is seen to decrease with an increase in nozzle Reynolds number. Because of the smaller negative pressure gradient experienced during sneak transition with a decrease in nozzle Reynolds number, the separation point is seen to move into the region of wall inflection much earlier and tends to stay in the region of wall inflection for a relatively longer time. Although the time duration of final transition remains more or less constant for different nozzle supply pressure values, the time durati...

24 citations