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Author

K.M. Sivalingham

Bio: K.M. Sivalingham is an academic researcher from Washington State University. The author has contributed to research in topic(s): Wireless network & Communications protocol. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publication(s) receiving 40 citation(s).
Papers
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
12 Oct 1997-
TL;DR: The design and analysis of a medium access control protocol called EC-MAC (energy conserving medium access protocol) that supports multimedia traffic for wireless ATM networks and simulation based performance analysis of the protocol for voice, video and data traffic is presented.
Abstract: This paper presents the design and analysis of a medium access control protocol called EC-MAC (energy conserving medium access protocol) that supports multimedia traffic for wireless ATM networks. The objective of protocol design is to develop a low-power access protocol that will provide support for different traffic types with quality-of-service (QoS). The network architecture is derived from a testbed built at Bell Labs called SWAN (Seamless Wireless ATM network). The network is based on the infrastructure model where one base station serves all the mobiles currently in its cell. A reservation based approach is proposed, with appropriate scheduling of the requests from the mobiles. This strategy is utilized to accomplish the goals of reduced power consumption and support service quality provision in wireless links. Simulation based performance analysis of the protocol for voice, video and data traffic is presented.

40 citations


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Proceedings ArticleDOI
25 Oct 1998-
Abstract: b this paper we present a case for using new power-aware metn.cs for determining routes in wireless ad hoc networks. We present five ~erent metriw based on battery power consumption at nodw. We show that using th=e metrics in a shortest-cost routing algorithm reduces the cost/packet of routing packets by 5-30% over shortwt-hop routing (this cost reduction is on top of a 40-70% reduction in energy consumption obtained by using PAMAS, our MAC layer prtocol). Furthermore, using these new metrics ensures that the mean time to node failure is increased si~cantly. An interesting property of using shortest-cost routing is that packet delays do not increase. Fintiy, we note that our new metrim can be used in most tradition routing protocols for ad hoc networks.

1,879 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Suresh Singh1, Cauligi S. Raghavendra2Institutions (2)
01 Jul 1998-
TL;DR: A new multiaccess protocol based on the original MACA protocol with the adition of a separate signalling channel that conserves battery power at nodes by intelligently powering off nodes that are not actively transmitting or receiving packets.
Abstract: In this paper we develop a new multiaccess protocol for ad hoc radio networks. The protocol is based on the original MACA protocol with the adition of a separate signalling channel. The unique feature of our protocol is that it conserves battery power at nodes by intelligently powering off nodes that are not actively transmitting or receiving packets. The manner in which nodes power themselves off does not influence the delay or throughput characteristics of our protocol. We illustrate the power conserving behavior of PAMAS via extensive simulations performed over ad hoc networks containing 10-20 nodes. Our results indicate that power savings of between 10% and 70% are attainable in most systems. Finally, we discuss how the idea of power awareness can be built into other multiaccess protocols as well.

1,253 citations


Journal Article
Abstract: Dynamic power management (DPM) is a design methodology for dynamically reconfiguring systems to provide the requested services and performance levels with a minimum number of active components or a minimum load on such components. DPM encompasses a set of techniques that achieves energy-efficient computation by selectively turning off (or reducing the performance of) system components when they are idle (or partially unexploited). In this paper, we survey several approaches to system-level dynamic power management. We first describe how systems employ power-manageable components and how the use of dynamic reconfiguration can impact the overall power consumption. We then analyze DPM implementation issues in electronic systems, and we survey recent initiatives in standardizing the hardware/software interface to enable software-controlled power management of hardware components.

1,155 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper describes how systems employ power-manageable components and how the use of dynamic reconfiguration can impact the overall power consumption, and survey recent initiatives in standardizing the hardware/software interface to enable software-controlled power management of hardware components.
Abstract: Dynamic power management (DPM) is a design methodology for dynamically reconfiguring systems to provide the requested services and performance levels with a minimum number of active components or a minimum load on such components DPM encompasses a set of techniques that achieves energy-efficient computation by selectively turning off (or reducing the performance of) system components when they are idle (or partially unexploited) In this paper, we survey several approaches to system-level dynamic power management We first describe how systems employ power-manageable components and how the use of dynamic reconfiguration can impact the overall power consumption We then analyze DPM implementation issues in electronic systems, and we survey recent initiatives in standardizing the hardware/software interface to enable software-controlled power management of hardware components

1,113 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A finite-state, abstract system model for power-managed systems based on Markov decision processes is introduced and the problem of finding policies that optimally tradeoff performance for power can be cast as a stochastic optimization problem and solved exactly and efficiently.
Abstract: Dynamic power management schemes (also called policies) reduce the power consumption of complex electronic systems by trading off performance for power in a controlled fashion, taking system workload into account. In a power-managed system it is possible to set components into different states, each characterized by performance and power consumption levels. The main function of a power management policy is to decide when to perform component state transitions and which transition should be performed, depending on system history, workload, and performance constraints. In the past, power management policies have been formulated heuristically. The main contribution of this paper is to introduce a finite-state, abstract system model for power-managed systems based on Markov decision processes. Under this model, the problem of finding policies that optimally tradeoff performance for power can be cast as a stochastic optimization problem and solved exactly and efficiently. The applicability and generality of the approach are assessed by formulating the Markov model and optimizing power management policies for several systems.

453 citations


Performance
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Author's H-index: 1

No. of papers from the Author in previous years
YearPapers
19971