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Kai Kaiser

Bio: Kai Kaiser is an academic researcher from Bank Indonesia. The author has contributed to research in topics: Decentralization & Public expenditure. The author has an hindex of 18, co-authored 41 publications receiving 1412 citations. Previous affiliations of Kai Kaiser include London School of Economics and Political Science & World Bank.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors evaluate the proliferation of local governments concurrent with Indo-nesia's 2001 decentralisation and present a new dataset that elucidates the characteristics of these new kota and kabupaten, and review political, fiscal and economic incentives for creating new jurisdictions.
Abstract: This paper evaluates the proliferation of local governments concurrent with Indo-nesia's 2001 decentralisation. Largely static for decades under the New Order, the number of municipalities (kota) and districts (kabupaten) has increased by half, from 292 before decentralisation to 434 in 2003. Most of the increase is off-Java. This represents a fundamental change in Indonesia's subnational administrative, political and fiscal landscape. We present a new dataset that elucidates the characteristics of these new kota and kabupaten, and review political, fiscal and economic incentives for creating new jurisdictions. We find that geographic dispersion, political and ethnic diversity, natural resource wealth and scope for bureaucratic rent seeking all influence the likelihood of regional splits. Since jurisdictional changes will affect local governance and service delivery, we stress the importance of providing an effective institutional framework for the creation – or future amalgamation – of local governments ...

201 citations

Book
01 Dec 2011
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present an analytical framework for assessing a country's political economy and institutional environment as it relates to natural resource management and, on that basis, they offer a substantial set of targeted prescriptions across the natural resource value chain that are technically sound and compatible with the identified underlying incentives.
Abstract: This volume emphasizes instead the notion of 'good fit,' taking the position that welfare-promoting policies, institutions, and governance must be tailored, at least in part, to a country's specific context In this vein, the volume presents an analytical framework for assessing a country's political economy and institutional environment as it relates to natural resource management and, on that basis, it offers a substantial set of targeted prescriptions across the natural resource value chain that are technically sound and compatible with the identified underlying incentives In other words, the objective of this book is to help development practitioners unravel the political economy dynamics surrounding natural resource management in order to complement their technically grounded engagement To this end, the analytical approach has been two-pronged First, case studies were conducted on the political economy of the hydrocarbon and mineral value chains in 13 countries in the Africa, East Asia and Pacific, and Latin America and the Caribbean regions Second, in light of this empirical material, the book highlights the current frontier of applied political economy analysis on resource dependence This volume synthesizes the empirical and the theoretical with an emphasis on illuminating the implications for operational engagement in resource-dependent settings

161 citations

Posted Content
01 Sep 2009
TL;DR: A good practice framework for integrating governance and political economy (GPE) analysis more systematically into Bank operational work is presented in this article, which is tailored to the context of bank operations and strategy development (such as country assistance strategies).
Abstract: Politics and the political economy matter for whether and how reforms happen in developing as well as in developed countries. The World Bank as an institution and its individual country and task teams has been grappling with this issue for many years. The good practice framework described here is an attempt to summarize relevant analytic tools and approaches, to indicate how it can be used (more) systematically, and to make key lessons readily available. It also seeks to set out how such tools can be used in a way that is problem driven, that is, focused on specific issues and challenges rather than on developing broad overviews, in order to generate operationally relevant findings and implications. Integrating governance and political economy (GPE) analysis more systematically into Bank operational work is important to enhance development effectiveness, to better address risks, and to respond to client demands for approaches that are tailored to specific situations. The objective of this framework is to systematize approaches to GPE analysis and to provide orientation for teams that are considering undertaking it. The framework especially draws on the experience with a number of pilot studies undertaken in FY2008 and FY2009, as well as on earlier studies. Analysis focused on a variety of sectors- electricity, transport, and telecommunications, water, and public sector reforms and on thematic challenges, especially the management of natural resource wealth. The framework is therefore tailored to the context of Bank operations and strategy development (such as country assistance strategies) designed to show how GPE analysis can be used to inform and shape them to support more effective development. The framework is divided into six parts: part one discusses the overall rationale of this framework and sets out the key foundations. Part two discusses how PGPE analysis can be used to inform and shape Bank strategies and operations, and offers options for translating the analysis into action more broadly. Part three sets out the various levels of analysis that may be undertaken, from an overall country focus, to a sector or thematic focus, to a GPE analysis that is undertaken to inform specific projects or policy decisions. Part four addresses the issue of evidencing a GPE analysis, a key challenge in producing high-quality work. Part five addresses process issues that arise when undertaking GPE-type analysis. Finally, part six gives conclusion and looking forward.

160 citations

OtherDOI
20 Dec 2004
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present original papers, written by a select group of widely recognized and distinguished scholars, that take a hard, objective look at the many effects of decentralization on economic and political issues in Indonesia.
Abstract: Indonesia is currently facing some severe challenges, both in political affairs and in economic management. One of these challenges is the recently enacted decentralization program, now well underway, which promises to have some wide-ranging consequences. This edited volume presents original papers, written by a select group of widely recognized and distinguished scholars, that take a hard, objective look at the many effects of decentralization on economic and political issues in Indonesia.

123 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors employ a combination of qualitative fieldwork with an exploratory statistical analysis of the 2003 Village Potential Statistics collected by the Bureau of Statistics (Potensi Desa-PODES), which maps conflict across all of Indonesia's villages/neighborhoods.

116 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Jan 1985

1,861 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors exploit exogenous price shocks in inter-national commodity markets and a rich dataset on civil war in Colombia to assess how dierent income shocks aect armed conflict.
Abstract: How do income shocks aect armed con‡ict? Theory suggests two op- posite eects. If labor is used to appropriate resources violently, higher wages may lower con‡ict by reducing labor supplied to appropriation. This is the opportunity cost eect. Alternatively, a rise in contestable income may increase violence by raising gains from appropriation. This is the rapacity eect. Our paper exploits exogenous price shocks in inter- national commodity markets and a rich dataset on civil war in Colombia to assess how dierent income shocks aect con‡ict. We examine changes in the price of agricultural goods (which are labor intensive) and natural resources (which are capital intensive). We focus on coee and oil, the two largest exports. We …nd that a sharp fall in coee prices in the 1990s increased violence dierentially in regions growing more coee, by lower- ing wages and the opportunity cost of joining armed groups. In contrast, a rise in oil prices increased violence dierentially in the oil region, by in- creasing municipal revenue siphoned through rapacity. This pattern holds in several other agricultural and natural resource sectors, providing robust evidence that price shocks aect con‡ict in opposite directions depending on the factor intensity of the commodity.

928 citations

01 Dec 2009
TL;DR: Paul P. Peterson as mentioned in this paper, "Resena del libro:======Politics in Time", History, Institutions and Social Analysis. New Jersey, 2004, p. 196 p.
Abstract: Resena del libro: Politics in Time. History, Institutions and Social Analysis. PAUL PIERSON. Princeton University Press. New Jersey, 2004. 196 p.

561 citations