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Kaifeng Jiang

Bio: Kaifeng Jiang is an academic researcher from Ohio State University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Human resource management & Strategic human resource planning. The author has an hindex of 21, co-authored 51 publications receiving 4207 citations. Previous affiliations of Kaifeng Jiang include Max M. Fisher College of Business & Mendoza College of Business.

Papers published on a yearly basis

Papers
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TL;DR: The authors examined the effects of three dimensions of HR systems (skillsenhancing, motivationenhancing and opportunity-enhancing) on the ability-motivation-opportunity model.
Abstract: Drawing on the ability-motivation-opportunity model, this meta-analysis examined the effects of three dimensions of HR systems—skills-enhancing, motivation-enhancing, and opportunity-enhancing—on p...

1,624 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The field of strategic human resource management (HRM) has a long and rich tradition as mentioned in this paper, and it has attracted much attention over the past three decades, paying particular attention to the value of HRM systems as management tools for influencing a wide variety of outcomes of concern to internal (employees and their managers) and external (owners, customers, society, other organizations).
Abstract: The field of strategic human resource management (HRM) has a long and rich tradition. As a prelude to our description of the field's history, we provide an expansive definition of strategic HRM scholarship and offer an aspirational framework for strategic HRM scholarship that captures the multidisciplinary nature of the field. We then systematically review and critique three decades of strategic HRM theory and research, paying particular attention to the value of HRM systems as management tools for influencing a wide variety of outcomes of concern to internal (employees and their managers) and external (owners, customers, society, other organizations) stakeholders. In support of continued advancement of the empirical knowledge base of strategic HRM, we encourage new research that embraces systems thinking, more fully addresses the concerns of multiple stakeholders, and strives for greater practical usefulness by addressing significant problems such as managing innovation and environmental sustaina...

616 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors review the components of human resource systems and delineate how the parts of human resources systems work together to influence employee performance and theoretical and empirical implications for future research are also discussed.

389 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The present meta-analytic study introduces an overall model of the relationships between job embeddedness and turnover outcomes, and found that on- the-job and off-the-job embeddedness negatively related to turnover intentions and actual turnover, after controlling for job satisfaction, affective commitment, and job alternatives.
Abstract: The present meta-analytic study introduces an overall model of the relationships between job embeddedness and turnover outcomes. Drawing on 65 independent samples (N = 42,907), we found that on-the-job and off-the-job embeddedness negatively related to turnover intentions and actual turnover, after controlling for job satisfaction, affective commitment, and job alternatives. In addition, the negative relationships between on-the-job embeddedness (off-the-job embeddedness) and turnover criteria were stronger in female-dominated samples and public organizations (collectivistic countries). Finally, turnover intentions, job search behavior, and job performance fully (partially) mediated the effect of on-the-job embeddedness (off-the-job embeddedness) on actual turnover. The research and practical implications of our findings are noted, in light of study limitations and future research needs.

340 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Support is found for service climate as a critical linkage between internal and external service parameters and differential effects of service-oriented versus general human resource practices and leadership on service climate, as well as disparate impacts of service climate contingent on types of service, measures of serviceClimate, and sources of rating.
Abstract: Service climate captures employees' consensual perceptions of organizations' emphasis on service quality. Although many studies have examined the foundation issues and outcomes of service climate, there is a lack of a comprehensive model explicating the antecedents, outcomes, and moderators of service climate. The current study fills this void in the literature. By conducting a meta-analysis of 58 independent samples (N = 9,363), we found support for service climate as a critical linkage between internal and external service parameters. In addition, we found differential effects of service-oriented versus general human resource practices and leadership on service climate, as well as disparate impacts of service climate contingent on types of service, measures of service climate, and sources of rating. Research and practical implications are discussed.

295 citations


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3,181 citations

Book
01 Jun 1976

2,728 citations

Book
02 Nov 1990
TL;DR: The article proposes an integration of climate and culture thinking and research and concludes with practical implications for the management of effective contemporary organizations.
Abstract: Organizational climate and organizational culture theory and research are reviewed. The article is first framed with definitions of the constructs, and preliminary thoughts on their interrelationships are noted. Organizational climate is briefly defined as the meanings people attach to interrelated bundles of experiences they have at work. Organizational culture is briefly defined as the basic assumptions about the world and the values that guide life in organizations. A brief history of climate research is presented, followed by the major accomplishments in research on the topic with regard to levels issues, the foci of climate research, and studies of climate strength. A brief overview of the more recent study of organizational culture is then introduced, followed by samples of important thinking and research on the roles of leadership and national culture in understanding organizational culture and performance and culture as a moderator variable in research in organizational behavior. The final section of the article proposes an integration of climate and culture thinking and research and concludes with practical implications for the management of effective contemporary organizations. Throughout, recommendations are made for additional thinking and research.

2,406 citations

01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that rational actors make their organizations increasingly similar as they try to change them, and describe three isomorphic processes-coercive, mimetic, and normative.
Abstract: What makes organizations so similar? We contend that the engine of rationalization and bureaucratization has moved from the competitive marketplace to the state and the professions. Once a set of organizations emerges as a field, a paradox arises: rational actors make their organizations increasingly similar as they try to change them. We describe three isomorphic processes-coercive, mimetic, and normative—leading to this outcome. We then specify hypotheses about the impact of resource centralization and dependency, goal ambiguity and technical uncertainty, and professionalization and structuration on isomorphic change. Finally, we suggest implications for theories of organizations and social change.

2,134 citations