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Kaja Marczewska

Bio: Kaja Marczewska is an academic researcher from Durham University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Originality & Copying. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 7 publications receiving 14 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors discusses a curatorial approach to authorship as a model for thinking about what they describe as an iterative modular poem, a poetic text composed of appropriated segments, and argues that the established paradigms of authorship, creativity and originality are inadequate with respect to contemporary experimental poetic practices to suggest a shift from creating to collecting and curating as a possible alternative model for think about instances of iterative creative writing.
Abstract: This article discusses a curatorial approach to authorship as a model for thinking about what I describe as an iterative modular poem, a poetic text composed of appropriated segments. As a response to contemporary proliferation of literary and artistic works created by iterative means, i.e. through acts of appropriation, remixing and remediation, the article is an attempt at putting forward ‘the curatorial’ as an emerging paradigm of writing for the twenty-first century. The article approaches established paradigms of authorship, creativity and originality as inadequate with respect to contemporary experimental poetic practices to suggest a shift from creating to collecting and curating as a possible alternative model for thinking about instances of iterative creative writing. The argument focuses on Robert Fitterman’s Holocaust Museum (2011) as an example of an iterative modular poem and a text emblematic of such curatorial approach to authorship.

3 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: The authors investigates the implications of the increasingly prominent propensity to copy as a creative practice in contemporary culture and proposes the notion of iteration as a possible alternative to the traditional categories of originality, creativity, and authorship.
Abstract: This thesis investigates the implications of the increasingly prominent propensity to copy as a creative practice in contemporary culture. While debates about plagiarism, copyright infringement, and the state of copyright inform this project, the focus here is on broader issues. The argument is formulated as an attempt at defining a cultural condition that triggers novel attitudes to creativity in order to explore the possibilities of a reconceptualisation of copying as a creative category. The aesthetic tendencies identified in this project are presented as heavily influenced by the emergence of new technologies. But the thesis is not an analysis of the twenty-first century new media culture. Instead, the contemporary technological moment is discussed as a condition of postproduction, in an attempt to devise a historical and critical framework that goes beyond questions of the intersection of creativity and technology. By doing so, this project strives to interrogate the restrictions and inadequacies of the dominant categories of originality, creativity, and authorship, in legal and creative terms, to propose the notion of iteration as a possible alternative. Practices of copying are represented as a necessary condition of contemporary culture and a manifestation of a shift in aesthetics, here defined as the Iterative turn. Chapter 1 formulates a critical framework for discussing iteration and positions the contemporary Iterative turn in relation to developments in the visual arts, literature, publishing, and law. Chapters 2, 3, and 4 offer a discussion of representative approaches to contemporary iterative writing and possible ways of conceptualising the means by which they engage with notions of originality, creativity, and authorship. While the focus here is first and foremost on literary texts, extensive references are made to the arts broadly conceived: the media and media theory, philosophy, literary and art theory, as well as case law and critical legal studies, to arrive at a more comprehensive formulation of the aesthetics of iteration for the emergent cultural condition. In its attempt to think about the contemporary, the thesis posits a framework for looking beyond the established paradigms of writing.

1 citations


Cited by
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01 Nov 2013
TL;DR: The ouvrage developpe un regard croise sur la question de la mise en exposition d'œuvres et de dispositifs reposant sur des systemes immateriels, collaboratifs et/ou participatif, a suite de formes d’art plus ancienne comme l’ont ete l-art video, léon et al. as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Cet ouvrage developpe un regard croise sur la question de la mise en exposition d’œuvres et de dispositifs reposant sur des systemes immateriels, collaboratifs et/ou participatifs, a la suite de formes d’art plus ancienne comme l’ont ete l’art video, l’art dematerialise et conceptuel, sociologique et relatif a la performance, qui, en leur temps, avaient elles aussi poser questions. Guides par la plume experte du commissaire d’expositions Steve Dietz qui signe la preface de l’ouvrage, les lect...

88 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2019
TL;DR: In this article, a post-digital (auto-ethnographic) approach is proposed to make visible the workings and effects of linguistic capitalism, using data gathered from Google AdWords for both quantitative and qualitative analysis.
Abstract: Adopting the framework of Benjamin’s 1936 essay ‘The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction’ (1999, 2008), and thinking through central themes of value, context and circulation, this thesis examines how language moves through digital space. Concentrating on Google’s search and advertising platforms, the thesis explores the concept of ‘linguistic capitalism’ (Kaplan 2014), arguing that the ongoing effects on digitally mediated language are both linguistic and political. Indeed, the politics and power which lurk behind these technologies are often obscured, or normalised, by their ubiquity and aesthetics, a process which, following Benjamin, can perhaps only be exposed by the repoliticisation of language through art. Using poetry and classic texts such as Orwell’s ‘Nineteen Eighty-Four’, as well as existing and experimental writing, the thesis harnesses the power of language and literature to critique and resist the technologies that exploit it in today’s digital economy. Adopting what I am calling a post-digital (auto)ethnographic approach, the thesis offers an innovative new method in order to make visible the workings and effects of linguistic capitalism, using data gathered from Google AdWords for both quantitative and qualitative analysis, as well as introducing and documenting the development and reception of my own piece of ‘political’ art in the form of a critical creative intervention called {poem}.py. DECLARATION OF AUTHORSHIP I, Pip Thornton, hereby declare that the work presented in this thesis is the result of original research I conducted whilst enrolled in the Information Security Group and Department of Geography as a candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. This work has not been submitted for any other degree or award in any other university or educational establishment. Where I have consulted the work of others or worked in collaboration, this is clearly stated. Pip Thornton 17th December 2018

30 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
24 Jul 2018
TL;DR: For instance, the authors argues that language has always been a tool of power over people and places, yet in today's world of digital communication and advertising, words flowing through the proprietary platforms of the Web are used i
Abstract: Language has always been a tool of power over people and places, yet in today’s world of digital communication and advertising, words flowing through the proprietary platforms of the Web are used i

15 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this paper, a genealogy of OA publishing is proposed, taking into account feminist and decolonial transnational publishing initiatives that have been active in non-digital realms before, and in parallel to what these critical strands have highlighted as their digital origins.
Abstract: In this article, I suggest opening out from the digital genealogies critical strands within the Open Access (OA) movement usually associate themselves with: I propose a genealogy of OA publishing that takes into consideration feminist and decolonial transnational publishing initiatives that have been active in non-digital realms before, and in parallel to what these critical strands have highlighted as their digital origins. The ways in which these pre-digital initiatives organised and mobilised feminist and decolonial transnational struggle through publishing might offer new insights for contemporary critical OA – specifically, with regards to questions around how to confront uneven hierarchies of place in academia, while holding in tension their intersectional character. By asking “what would the future of critical OA publishing look like, if it BEGAN its formulation from the perspective of feminist, decolonial, anti-capitalist and transnational organising?”, I would like to sketch critical OA as a practice that moves beyond a liberal academic stance to actively develop a radical transnational and trans-epistemic ethic of resistance against capitalist, colonialist, and patriarchal domination.

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Feminist in a Software Lab as mentioned in this paper provides an overview of how a digital platform for scholarly work brought the concerns of cultural theory into dialog with software development and discussed the differences between the two.
Abstract: Feminist in a Software Lab: Difference + Design provides an overview of how a digital platform for scholarly work brought the concerns of cultural theory into dialog with software development. As t...

8 citations