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Author

Kamala Krithivasan

Bio: Kamala Krithivasan is an academic researcher from Indian Institute of Technology Madras. The author has contributed to research in topic(s): Automata theory & Context-sensitive grammar. The author has an hindex of 14, co-authored 122 publication(s) receiving 696 citation(s). Previous affiliations of Kamala Krithivasan include Madras Christian College & Indian Institutes of Technology.


Papers
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Book ChapterDOI

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23 May 2001
TL;DR: A new variant of P systems, P systems with membrane creation, in which some objects are productive and create membranes is proposed, capable of solving the Hamiltonian Path Problem in linear time.
Abstract: P systems, introduced by Gh. Paun form a new class of distributed computing model. Several variants of P systems were already shown to be computationally universal. In this paper, we propose a new variant of P systems, P systems with membrane creation, in which some objects are productive and create membranes. This new variant of P systems is capable of solving the Hamiltonian Path Problem in linear time. We show that P systems with membrane creation are computationally complete.

53 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

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TL;DR: These computing devices allow non-determinism between the rules ac → a and ac → ā, c ϵ ℕ, thus help to generate languages which cannot be generated using simple SN P systems.
Abstract: An Spiking Neural P system with anti-spikes uses two types of objects called spikes and anti-spikes which can encode binary digits in a natural way. The step when system emits a spike or an anti-spike is associated with symbol 1 and 0, respectively. Here we consider these computing devices as language generators. They allow non-determinism between the rules ac → a and ac → ā, c ϵ ℕ, thus help to generate languages which cannot be generated using simple SN P systems.

25 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

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TL;DR: This paper considers hexagonal arrays on triangular grids and introduces hexagonal local picture languages and hexagonal tiling systems defining hexagonal recognizable picture languages, and proves that recognizable hexagonal picture languages are characterized as projections of xyz-local picture languages.
Abstract: In this paper we consider hexagonal arrays on triangular grids and introduce hexagonal local picture languages and hexagonal tiling systems defining hexagonal recognizable picture languages, motivated by an analogous study of rectangular arrays by Giammarresi and Restivo. We also introduce hexagonal Wang tiles to define hexagonal Wang systems (HWS) as a formalism to describe hexagonal picture languages. It is noticed that the family of hexagonal picture languages defined by hexagonal Wang systems and the family recognized by hexagonal tiling systems coincide. Analogous to hv-domino systems describing rectangular arrays, we define xyz-domino systems and prove that recognizable hexagonal picture languages are characterized as projections of xyz-local picture languages.

20 citations

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01 Jan 2000

20 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

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TL;DR: Returning parallel communicating finite automata systems are equivalent to the non-returning variants by proving the equivalence of both with multihead finite Automata.
Abstract: A parallel communicating automata system consists of several automata working independently in parallel and communicating with each other by request with the aim of recognizing a word. Rather surprisingly, returning parallel communicating finite automata systems are equivalent to the non-returning variants. We show this result by proving the equivalence of both with multihead finite automata. Some open problems are finally formulated.

20 citations


Cited by
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Book ChapterDOI

[...]

01 Jan 2000

395 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

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TL;DR: The present paper presents the basic ideas of computing with membranes and some fundamental properties (mostly concerning the computational power and efficiency) of P systems of various types.
Abstract: Membrane systems are models of computation which are inspired by some basic features of biological membranes. In a membrane system multisets of objects are placed in the compartments defined by the membrane structure, and the objects evolve by means of "reaction rules" also associated with the compartments, and applied in a maximally parallel, nondeterministic manner. The objects can pass through membranes, the membranes can change their permeability, they can dissolve, and they can divide. These features are used in defining transitions between configurations of the system, and sequences of transitions are used to define computations. In the case of symbol-objects, we compute a set of numbers, and in the case of string-objects we compute a set of strings, hence a language. Many different classes of such computing devices (now called P systems) have already been investigated. Most of them are computationally universal, i.e., equal in power to Turing machines. Systems with an enhanced parallelism are able to trade space for time and solve in this way (at least in principle), by making use of an exponential space, intractable problems in a feasible time.The present paper presents the basic ideas of computing with membranes and some fundamental properties (mostly concerning the computational power and efficiency) of P systems of various types.

354 citations

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01 Jan 2005

303 citations

Book

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01 Jan 1986
TL;DR: Investigations into Drosophila Wing Development - Results from a Lindenmayer Model and the Theoretical Basis of the Transplantation Experiment.
Abstract: Investigations into Drosophila Wing Development - Results from a Lindenmayer Model.- Fibonacci Words - A Survey.- Planar Map Generation by Parallel Binary Fission/Fusion Grammars.- Modular Trellises.- A New Proof for the DOL Sequence Equivalence Problem and its Implications.- On Compound Lindenmayer Systems.- Graph Grammars with Application Conditions.- The ETOL Hierarchy is in the OI Hierarchy.- Polyhedral Cell Shapes.- On Cyclically Overlap-Free Words in Binary Alphabets.- The Theoretical Basis of the Transplantation Experiment.- Fixed and Stationary ?-Words and ?-Languages.- DOL Schemes and Recurrent Words.- Stochastic OL Systems and Formal Power Series.- Complexity of L-Systems.- Compartmental Hybrid State Production-Diffusion Systems with Application to Prestalk-Prespore Pattern Regulation in Cellular Slime Molds.- Hierarchical Aspects of Plant Development.- Rule Trees Represent Derivations in Edge Replacement Systems.- Languages Defined by Indian Parallel Systems.- L Systems and NLOG-Reductions.- The Parikh-Boundedness of ETOL Languages of Finite Index.- Computer Networks with Compact Routing Tables.- Unconventional Leaves.- A Uniform Model for the Growth of Biological Organisms: Cooperating Sequential Processes.- Graph Technology Applied to a Software Project.- Some Systems for Map Generation.- A Programming Language for Lindenmayer Systems.- A Note on Significance of Cellular Interaction in L-System.- EOL Grammars and Search Trees.- Variation in Inflorescence Structure in Cotoneaster Franchetti.- Partial Path Groups and Parallel Graph Contractions.- When L was Young.- Equivalence Problems for Regular Sets of Word Morphisms.- Parentheses Grammars and Lindenmayer Grammars.- Array Languages and Lindenmayer Systems - A Survey.- Symmetric Distributed Termination.- Development, Growth and Time.- On the Set of all Subgraphs of the Graphs in a Boundary NLC Graph Language.- Graph-Controlled Systems - An Extension of OL Systems.

187 citations

Book ChapterDOI

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Gheorghe Paun1
01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: This is a comprehensive (and friendly) introduction to membrane computing (MC), meant to offer both computer scientists and non-computer scientists an up-to-date overview of the field.
Abstract: This is a comprehensive (and friendly) introduction to membrane computing (MC), meant to offer both computer scientists and non-computer scientists an up-to-date overview of the field. That is why the set of notions introduced here is rather large, but the presentation is informal, without proofs and with rigorous definitions given only for the basic types of P systems — symbol object P systems with multiset rewriting rules, systems with symport/antiport rules, systems with string objects, tissue-like P systems, and neural-like P systems. Besides a list of (biologically inspired or mathematically motivated) ingredients/features which can be used in systems of these types, we also mention a series of results, as well as a series of research trends and topics.

147 citations