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Kateryna Chernova

Bio: Kateryna Chernova is an academic researcher from Exelon. The author has contributed to research in topics: Subjective well-being & Happiness. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 2 publications receiving 251 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper investigated how an individual's self-reported happiness is related to the level of her income in absolute terms, and relative to other people in her country, and found that both absolute and relative income are positively and significantly correlated with happiness, quantitatively, changes in relative income have much larger effects on happiness than do changes in absolute income.
Abstract: This paper uses data from the World Values Survey to investigate how an individual’s self-reported happiness is related to (i) the level of her income in absolute terms, and (ii) the level of her income relative to other people in her country. The main findings are that (i) both absolute and relative income are positively and significantly correlated with happiness, (ii) quantitatively, changes in relative income have much larger effects on happiness than do changes in absolute income, and (iii) the effects on happiness of both absolute and relative income are small when compared to the effects several non-pecuniary factors.

181 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper investigated how an individual's self-reported happiness is related to the level of her income in absolute terms, and relative to other people in her country, and found that both absolute and relative income are positively and significantly correlated with happiness, quantitatively, changes in relative income have much larger effects on happiness than do changes in absolute income.
Abstract: This paper uses data from the World Values Survey to investigate how an individual's self-reported happiness is related to (i) the level of her income in absolute terms, and (ii) the level of her income relative to other people in her country. The main findings are that (i) both absolute and relative income are positively and significantly correlated with happiness, (ii) quantitatively, changes in relative income have much larger effects on happiness than do changes in absolute income, and (iii) the effects on happiness of both absolute and relative income are small when compared to the effects several non-pecuniary factors.

111 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results suggest that the oxytocinergic system is involved in modulating envy and gloating, contrary to the prevailing belief that this system is involvement solely in positive prosocial behaviors, it probably plays a key role in a wider range of social emotion-related behaviors.

427 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: In this article, the authors developed a model that augments the simple neoclassical framework by introducing relative income concerns into women's (or families') utility functions and found that women's decisions to seek paid employment depend on the employment decisions of other women with whom relative income comparisons might be important.
Abstract: We ask whether women's decisions to be in the labor force may be affected by the decisions of other women in ways not captured by standard models. We develop a model that augments the simple neoclassical framework by introducing relative income concerns into women's (or families') utility functions. In this model, the entry of some women into paid employment can spur the entry of other women, independently of wage and income effects. This mechanism may help to explain why, over some periods, women's employment appeared to rise faster than could be accounted for by the simple neoclassical model. We test the model by asking whether women's decisions to seek paid employment depend on the employment decisions of other women with whom relative income comparisons might be important. In particular, we look at the effects of sisters' employment on women's own employment. We find strong evidence that women's employment decisions are positively related to their sisters' employment decisions. We also take account of the possibility that this positive relationship arises from heterogeneity across families in unobserved variables affecting the employment decision. We conduct numerous empirical analyses to reduce or eliminate this heterogeneity bias. We also look at the relationship between husbands' relative income and wives' employment decisions. In our view, the evidence is largely supportive of the relative income hypothesis.

326 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review of attitudes toward parenthood and childlessness reveals that people tend to believe that parenthood is central to a meaningful and fulfilling life, and that the lives of childless people are emptier, less rewarding, and lonelier, than the life of parents.
Abstract: This paper reviews and compares folk theories and empirical evidence about the influence of parenthood on happiness and life satisfaction. The review of attitudes toward parenthood and childlessness reveals that people tend to believe that parenthood is central to a meaningful and fulfilling life, and that the lives of childless people are emptier, less rewarding, and lonelier, than the lives of parents. Most cross-sectional and longitudinal evidence suggest, however, that people are better off without having children. It is mainly children living at home that interfere with well-being, particularly among women, singles, lower socioeconomic strata, and people residing in less pronatalist societies—especially when these characteristics are combined. The discrepancy between beliefs and findings is discussed in relation to the various costs of parenting; the advantages of childlessness; adaptation and compensation among involuntarily childless persons; cognitive biases; and the possibility that parenthood confers rewards in terms of meaning rather than happiness.

284 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore various growth scenarios for Canada over the medium range to 2020 using a dynamic simulation model, and present conditions under which the rate of unemployment in Canada could be reduced to historically low levels, poverty eliminated and greenhouse gas emissions reduced to comply with Canada's commitment under the Kyoto Protocol, without relying on economic growth.

213 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper found that the association between income and happiness is indeed stronger for immigrants in the USA than for natives, but even for immigrants that association is still relatively weak, suggesting that migrants are mistaken in believing that economic migration is a path to improving one's well-being.
Abstract: Research on happiness casts doubt on the notion that increases in income generally bring greater happiness. This finding can be taken to imply that economic migration might fail to result in increased happiness for the migrants: migration as a means of increasing one’s income might be no more effective in raising happiness than other means of increasing one’s income. This implication is counterintuitive: it suggests that migrants are mistaken in believing that economic migration is a path to improving one’s well-being, at least to the extent that well-being means (or includes) happiness. This paper considers a scenario in which it is less likely that migrants are simply mistaken in this regard. The finding that increased incomes do not lead to greater happiness is an average (non)effect—and migrants might be exceptional in this regard, gaining happiness from increased incomes to a greater extent than most people. The analysis here, using data from the World Values Survey, finds that the association between income and happiness is indeed stronger for immigrants in the USA than for natives—but even for immigrants that association is still relatively weak. The discussion then considers this finding in light of the fact that immigrants also report lower levels of happiness than natives after controlling for other variables.

180 citations