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Kathleen O'Donnell

Bio: Kathleen O'Donnell is an academic researcher. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 17 citations.

Papers
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Dissertation
01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: In this paper, a statement of originality and a table of Table of Table 1 is presented, together with a Table of Tables of Table 2 and Table 3 of the abstracts.
Abstract: ................................................................................................................................................... i Statement of Originality ......................................................................................................................... iii Table of

17 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Taylor as mentioned in this paper presents a wide-ranging work of interdisciplinary scholarship, drawing together diverse literary, cultural, and religious sources in order to trace the emergence and evolution of green and dark green religions in North America.

129 citations

01 Apr 2010
TL;DR: Gibson and Tarrant as discussed by the authors discuss the range of interdependant factors needed to manage organisational resilience and demonstrate that effective resilience is built upon a range of different strategies that enhance both hard and soft organisational capabilities.
Abstract: Gibson and Tarrant discuss the range of inter-dependant factors needed to manage organisational resilience Over the last few years there has been considerable interest in the idea of resilience across all areas of society Like any new area or field this has produced a vast array of definitions, processes, management systems and measurement tools which together have clouded the concept of resilience Many of us have forgotten that ultimately resilience is not just about ‘bouncing back from adversity’ but is more broadly concerned with adaptive capacity and how we better understand and address uncertainty in our internal and external environments The basis of organisational resilience is a fundamental understanding and treatment of risk, particularly non-routine or disruption related risk This paper presents a number of conceptual models of organisational resilience that we have developed to demonstrate the range of inter-dependant factors that need to be considered in the management of such risk These conceptual models illustrate that effective resilience is built upon a range of different strategies that enhance both ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ organisational capabilities They emphasise the concept that there is no quick fix, no single process, management system or software application that will create resilience

99 citations

01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the factors and processes that contribute to the transnationalization of environmental movements from their origins in the global North to their increasing prevalence in the countries of the global South.
Abstract: This paper explores the factors and processes that contribute to the transnationalization of environmental movements from their origins in the global North to their increasing prevalence in the countries of the global South. It also considers the obstacles that confront transnationalization and their consequences. Its empirical starting point is a critical examination of the development of transantional environmentalism in the European Union, based upon surveys of organizations, interviews with activists, and scrutiny of newspaper reports. Developments in several key British environmental organizations are considered more closely as exemplars of processes and influences that are of wider significance. The character of transnational movement networks is considered, as is their relationship with environmental campaigns in both post-communist and newly industrializing countries in Europe and south-east Asia. Among the factors contributing to the transnationalizatin of environmental movements are changing patterns of opportunity associated with the development of international and transnational political institutions, and social changes of which the expansion of higher education and mass media, and increased ease of communication, are the most important. Nevertheless, the chief drivers to transnationalization of environmentalism, and to the expansion of its agenda to embrace global social justice, are developments substantially endogenous to the knowledge, belief and value systems of environmental movement organizations themselves.

10 citations