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Keith Bottomley

Bio: Keith Bottomley is an academic researcher from University of Hull. The author has contributed to research in topics: Remand (detention) & Criminal justice. The author has an hindex of 5, co-authored 8 publications receiving 107 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors assesses the effectiveness of rights provided for suspects in police custody which were intended to counterbalance increased police powers and conclude that these safeguards have had a significant, although variable, impact.
Abstract: Reporting findings from research on the impact of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (PACE), this paper assesses the effectiveness of rights provided for suspects in police custody which were intended to counterbalance increased police powers. It discusses (1) the involvement in the detention and questioning process of parents, social workers, and legal advisers; (2) the procedures which regulate the detention and questioning of suspects before charge; and (3) the effectiveness of sanctions and supervision. It concludes that these safeguards have had a significant, although variable, impact. Factors that have limited this impact are assessed. Claims that suspects’ rights are excessively hampering the detection of crime are criticized.

39 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (PACE) provides a notable example of a trend in common law jurisdictions towards changing and controlling policing by using techniques of legal regulation as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (PACE) provides a notable example of a trend in common law jurisdictions towards changing and controlling policing by using techniques of legal regulation. This involves extending (or formalizing), clarifying, and specifying police powers and suspects' rights by means of rules, including statutes, codes of practice, governmental circulars, and internal force orders. Their implementation is backed by record-keeping requirements, managerial supervision, and disciplinary sanctions. This article draws on research into the impact of PACE (and its codes of practice) on a police force in the north of England.' The relevant sections of PACE (which became operative in 1986) codified a wide range of police powers and suspects' rights. It is becoming clear from assessments of the initial effects of PACE that legal regulation has had a substantial, albeit variable, effect on policing in England and Wales.2 Legal regulation is a mode of accountability. It both facilitates and supplements judicial control, which in the past has generally been loose, as a result both of the discretionary breadth of much police law and of policy considerations.3 More specific rules and a political mandate to apply them has encouraged some judicial activity in this area.4 In England and Wales, legal regulation has been developed as part of an alternative to what is officially regarded as an outdated system of control by the local state. It takes its place in a new loose framework of accountability, constituted of various measures whose political origins and connections are diverse: there is, for example, the combination of budgetary/managerial reform and community liaison/crime prevention strategies. The specific origins of the move towards legal regulation

19 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A progressive crime policy would be informed by a broader conception of crime, would include social methods of crime reduction, and would pursue a wider range of goals including: doing justice, protecting the welfare of offenders, empowering victims, and reducing imprisonment and criminalisation.
Abstract: There is a tendency to construe both ‘crime’ and ‘crime policy’ in very narrow terms. Hence, crime policy is often regarded as being mainly about the prevention, through penal measures, of an unrepresentative range of offences. A progressive crime policy would be informed by a broader conception of crime, would include ‘social’ methods of crime reduction, and would pursue a wider range of goals including: doing justice, protecting the welfare of offenders, empowering victims, and reducing imprisonment and criminalisation. The Conservatives in office disseminated a narrow conception of the crime problem, which they addressed through a narrow ‘tough sentencing’ policy. In assessing Labour's crime policy we ask, not whether it is achieving more efficiently the goals pursued by the Conservatives, but whether it is developing a broader and more progressive vision of crime and crime policy. Labour's core concerns in this field‐ embodied in the Crime and Disorder Act 1998‐ are to prevent offending by yo...

14 citations


Cited by
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Book
06 Jan 2003
TL;DR: In this paper, the identification and measurement of 'oppressive' police interviewing tactics in Britain is discussed. But the authors focus on the psychological aspects of false confessions and the psychology of false belief leading to a false confession.
Abstract: About the Author.Series Preface.Preface.Acknowledgments.Introduction. PART I: INTERROGATIONS AND CONFESSIONS. Interrogation Tactics and Techniques. Interrogation in Britain. Persons at Risk During Interviews in Police Custody: the Royal Commission Studies. The Identification and Measurement of 'Oppressive' Police Interviewing Tactics in Britain. Why do Suspects Confess? Theories. Why do Suspects Confess? Empirical Findings. Miscarriages of Justice and False Confessions. The Psychology of False Confession: Research and Theoretical Issues. The Psychology of False Confession: Case Examples. PART II: LEGAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS. The English Law on Confessions. The American Law on Confessions. The Psychological Assessment. Suggestibility: Historical and Theoretical Aspects. Interrogative Suggestibility: Empirical Findings. PART III: BRITISH COURT OF APPEAL CASES. The Effects of Drugs and Alcohol Upon the Reliability of Testimony. The Court of Appeal. The 'Guildford Four' and the 'Birmingham Six'. Psychological Vulnerability. Police Impropriety. Misleading Special Knowledge. PART IV: FOREIGN CASES OF DISPUTED CONFESSIONS. Four High Profile American Cases. Canadian and Israeli Cases. Murder in Norway: a False Belief Leading to a False Confession. References. Appendix. Index.

635 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2002
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors use the term "interrogation" to refer to the questioning of criminal suspects, typically involving a confrontation, whereas the term 'interviewing' is more commonly used in cases of witnesses and victims.
Abstract: The term ‘interrogation’ is principally used in the literature and in police practice to refer to the questioning of criminal suspects, typically involving a confrontation, whereas the term ‘interviewing’ is more commonly used in cases of witnesses and victims. The term‘investigative interviewing’ has been proposed to cover both the interviewing of witnesses and suspects (Williamson 1993). However, for the purpose of this chapter we shall use the term ‘interrogation’ as we are specifically discussing the questioning of suspects.

175 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the key strategies underpinning New Labour's core governmental project of ''modernization through managerialization'' in criminal justice are outlined and evaluated, and a focus on crime reduction and youth justice is maintained, since addressing these ''wicked issues'' is pivotal to realizing New Britain's longterm objective of commanding the centre ground of law and order politics in the UK.
Abstract: The soundbite `tough on crime and tough on the causes of crime' was crucial to both the ideological rebirth of the Labour Party as `New Labour' and its landslide victory in the 1997 General Election. Indeed, one of New Labour's most remarkable political achievements, during its first term of office, was to have forged a `Third Way' law and order position that has successfully challenged the idea that social democratic political parties are by definition `soft on crime'. This article outlines and evaluates the key strategies underpinning New Labour's core governmental project of `modernization through managerialization' in criminal justice. Throughout, a focus on crime reduction and youth justice is maintained, since addressing these `wicked issues' is pivotal to realizing New Labour's long-term objective of commanding the centre ground of law and order politics in the UK. We argue that an institutionalization and normalization of managerialism is taking place to `resolve' the contradictions, tensions and ...

147 citations

Book Chapter
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: LSE Research Online as mentioned in this paper is a platform that allows users to access research output of the London School of Economics (LSE) to facilitate their private study or for non-commercial research.
Abstract: LSE has developed LSE Research Online so that users may access research output of the School. Copyright © and Moral Rights for the papers on this site are retained by the individual authors and/or other copyright owners. Users may download and/or print one copy of any article(s) in LSE Research Online to facilitate their private study or for non-commercial research. You may not engage in further distribution of the material or use it for any profit-making activities or any commercial gain. You may freely distribute the URL (http://eprints.lse.ac.uk) of the LSE Research Online website.

88 citations