scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Kene Igweonu

Other affiliations: Brill Publishers
Bio: Kene Igweonu is an academic researcher from Canterbury Christ Church University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Theatre studies & Reflective practice. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 6 publications receiving 18 citations. Previous affiliations of Kene Igweonu include Brill Publishers.

Papers
More filters
MonographDOI
Kene Igweonu1
01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: The Trends in Twenty-First Century African Theatre and Performance as mentioned in this paper is a collection of regionally focused articles on African theatre and performance, which provides a broad exploration of the current state of African theater and performance and considers the directions they are taking in the 21st century.
Abstract: Trends in Twenty-First Century African Theatre and Performance is a collection of regionally focused articles on African theatre and performance. The volume provides a broad exploration of the current state of African theatre and performance and considers the directions they are taking in the 21st Century. It contains sections on current trends in theatre and performance studies, on applied/community theatre and on playwrights. The chapters have evolved out of a working group process, in which papers were submitted to peer-group scrutiny over a period of four years, at four international conferences. The book will be particularly useful as a key text for undergraduate and postgraduate courses in non-western theatre and performance (where this includes African theatre and performance), and would be a very useful resource for theatre scholars and anyone interested in African performance forms and cultures.

8 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that expressive writing enables the creative practitioner to engage with their practice in insightful ways that integrate theoretical insights and help to reveal the elusive obvious, which in turn gives life to what is being explored.
Abstract: This article draws on the idea of the elusive obvious as a useful way of examining how creative arts practitioners can make sense of their practice through expressive writing. Defining the elusive obvious as that ethereal aspect of creative arts practice that is often palpable to the practitioner but equally hard to pin down within the creative process, the article argues that expressive writing enables the creative practitioner to engage with their practice in insightful ways that integrate theoretical insights and help to reveal the elusive obvious, which in turn gives life to what is being explored. It examines ways in which expressive writing could be used to facilitate practitioners' experience of their creative practice and facilitate a better appreciation of the interconnectedness of practice (doing) and theory (critical reflection and analysis) in the creative arts. The article draws on discussions on practice as research to highlight the distinction between 'writing out' and 'writing up'; where 'writing out' calls attention to the idea of 'searching' within the creative process, while 'writing up' is firmly located in the recording and documentation phase of that practice. It argues that it is within this process of 'writing out' - of searching - that the elusive obvious can be revealed. The article also illustrates how reflective practice/writing can be understood through drama. It examines how reflective practice/writing can often lead to 'eureka' moments when, by personalizing their practice within the creative working environment, practitioners suddenly discover the elusive obvious. Through the ideas explored in this article, we invite a consideration of how expressive writing can act as a vehicle through which meaning could be found. This article argues, therefore, that expressive writing is not an end in itself, but is exploratory and transient in nature, and a rich terrain for the elusive obvious to be revealed.

5 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examine the enduring influence of Africa on African-Caribbean culture and performance traditions, and highlight the need to recognize AfricanCaribbeans culture as a unique cultural manifestation by drawing on Joseph Roach's concept of the circum-Atlantic.
Abstract: This chapter examines the enduring influence of Africa on African-Caribbean culture and performance traditions, underscoring the need to recognize African-Caribbean culture as a unique cultural manifestation by drawing on Joseph Roach’s concept of the circum-Atlantic. It revisits intercultural theory, especially with regard to the cultural exchange between Africa and the Caribbean. At the same time, it examines how African-Caribbean performances challenge the notion of African authenticity, while retaining a genealogical link to the African past. It attempts to clarify the treatment of the term intercultural, particularly ways in which transnational dispersions of African forms have taken them in new directions through the discussion of African dance in a transnational context. The chapter underlines the compelling link between African and African-Caribbean performance aesthetics, but also presents a situation in which notions of own and foreign are both dispelled in performance. It also attempts to develop Osita Okagbue’s vision of a new intercultural critical terminology that will be useful in describing the unique interaction between African and African-Caribbean performance cultures through a proposed notion of interactional diffusion.

3 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that the superficial nature of the boundary between practice and theory often traps creative and performing arts students in a mindset that militates against critical and analytic writing as they struggle to make connections between their studio practice and wider theoretical contexts.
Abstract: This article focuses on my own practice and experience of teaching in the performing arts to examine how reflection could be used as a tool for facilitating learning in a way that does not construct practice and theory as distinct or opposing binaries. In it I argue that the superficial nature of the boundary between practice and theory often traps creative and performing arts students in a mindset that militates against critical and analytic writing as they struggle to make connections between their studio practice and wider theoretical contexts. Consequently, the article draws primarily on Maziar Raein's argument for a 'cohesive framework for knowledge' that recognizes the inter-relatedness of theory and practice in knowledge formation to argue that practice and theory operate along a continuum of knowledge. The article equally considers Paul Kleiman's argument about the centrality of the creative process in bridging the perceived gap between practice and theory within the creative and performing arts. Finally, I discuss the use of 'reflective breaks' in my teaching on the performing arts programme at Swansea Metropolitan University as a way of deconstructing the artificial boundaries between practice and theory.

2 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this paper, bush interprets wertenbaker's recurrent metatheatrical devices as "invoking the concept of actors' duality: their ability to inhabit two realities, two worlds, simultaneously" and argues that the theatre thus becomes "not just a place where lost voices (and consequently lost identities) can be regained, but... a space for practising the increasingly vital art of bi/ multiculturalism".
Abstract: convicts’ play-within-a-play in Our Country’s Good as a problematic adoption of “the language of the oppressor” (126), bush interprets wertenbaker’s recurrent metatheatrical devices as “invoking the concept of actors’ duality: their ability to inhabit two realities, two worlds, simultaneously”. the theatre thus becomes “not just . . . a place where lost voices (and consequently lost identities) can be regained, but . . . a space for practising the increasingly vital art of bi/ multiculturalism” (208). beyond the panoramic view on offer, the best moments in the book are those in which arguments such as the above are tackled with openness and lucidity, mirroring another of wertenbarker’s obsessions: the theatre as court. there, in the dramatist’s own words (qtd. 71), “we are asked to decide on the guilt or innocence of our society, our lives, and to take responsibility for it”.

1 citations


Cited by
More filters
DissertationDOI
31 May 2016
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a practice-centred teaching method for collaborative writing for design teams at M-level in higher education (HE) by using Approaches, Practices and Tools (APTs) across three case study workshops.
Abstract: This thesis offers and evaluates collaborative writing practices for teams of Design students at M-Level in Higher Education (HE). The research begins by asking why writing is included in current art and design HE, and identifies an assumption about the role of writing across the sector derived from a misreading of the 1960 and 1970 Coldstream Reports. As a result, drawing on recommendations that were made in the Reports for non-studio studies to be complementary to art and design practice in HE, I focus on how teams of design students can complement their design skills with collaborative writing. Some studies for addressing how design students learn from writing in HE already exist, but none have established a practice-centred teaching method for collaborative writing for design teams at M-level. My research captures the effects of my Approaches, Practices and Tools (APTs) across three case study workshops. I compare these with the most common writing model in HE designed for text-based study in the humanities. My APTs use participants' designerly strengths to redesign how they can use writing to complement their practice. This provides learners with a means of identifying and creating their own situated writing structures and practices. I document how my practice-centred APTs position collaborative writing practices as a designerly mode of communication between design practitioners working in teams. I show it to be more complementary to practice and so more effective in comparison to models imported from the humanities. My explorations are carried out through two thesis sections. Section One is an in-depth literature-based rationale that critically informs my investigations. Section Two presents my methodologies and reports three case studies, in which I explore the emergent data collected through a range of qualitative methods, mapping and evaluative techniques. The findings are of importance to those teaching M-Level design courses.

24 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper argued that the use of violence by the colonial, imperial system against Black people has its origins in colonialism and slavery and maintained that there is a distinction between "a body" and "the Body".
Abstract: The parading of the nude body of Sarah Baartman by the British colonisers led England and France to racially categorise her as a subhuman. Her Black body was viewed as something that can be violated, exploited, destructed, penetrated, and subjugated to various inhumane conditions. According to Fanon, there is a world order that determines who fits where and how: “The colonial world is a world cut in two”. The militaristic response by the state to the people’s protest point to the fact that technology, the regimes, and the targets still remain. In this article, I will argue that the use of violence by the colonial, imperial system against Sarah Baartman (Black people) has its origins in colonialism and slavery. I maintain that there is a distinction between “a body” and “the Body”. The paper will use as basis the intersectionality theory. Conclusions will be drawn.

8 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Mar 2017-TDR
TL;DR: Prefigurative interventions and occupations comprise a form of activism comparable to theatrical performance as mentioned in this paper, embodying, situating, and performing hypothetical scenarios, and employ site-sensitive interventions, tactical media, applied theatre, and cognate modes of interactivity.
Abstract: Prefigurative interventions and occupations comprise a form of activism comparable to theatrical performance — embodying, situating, and performing hypothetical scenarios. These open-ended, horizontal performance practices employ site-sensitive interventions, tactical media, applied theatre, and cognate modes of interactivity.

7 citations