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Kenneth Lasson

Bio: Kenneth Lasson is an academic researcher from University of Baltimore. The author has contributed to research in topics: Civil liberties & Constitution. The author has an hindex of 6, co-authored 44 publications receiving 136 citations. Previous affiliations of Kenneth Lasson include Boston College & Loyola University Chicago.

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TL;DR: Rodell predicted that professional purveyors of pretentious poppycock would have spawned so furiously, that the contemporary law reviews collectively called "spinach" would have mushroomed into such a gargantuan souffle of airy irrelevance.
Abstract: In 1937, when Fred Rodell issued his once-famous diatribe, some 150 law-related journals were being published (not to mention thousands of local newspapers and countless full-color comic books). Now there are over eight hundred legal periodicals (not to mention a drastically dwindled number of daily papers, and precious few comics). Both Solomon and Rodell have been all but forgotten. What, indeed, have we wrought? Although Rodell predicted his original panning would have no effect, could he have anticipated the sheer dimensions of this worst-case scenario - that his "professional purveyors of pretentious poppycock" would have spawned so furiously, that the contemporary law reviews he collectively called "spinach" would have mushroomed into such a gargantuan souffle of airy irrelevance?Lo, the voices are heard once again in the wilderness, from the bewildered among us innocent (or ignorant) enough to try writing the wrongs perpetrated in the name of Scholarship.

17 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Rodell predicted that professional purveyors of pretentious poppycock would have spawned so furiously, that the contemporary law reviews collectively called "spinach" would have mushroomed into such a gargantuan souffle of airy irrelevance as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: In 1937, when Fred Rodell issued his once-famous diatribe, some 150 law-related journals were being published (not to mention thousands of local newspapers and countless full-color comic books). Now there are over eight hundred legal periodicals (not to mention a drastically dwindled number of daily papers, and precious few comics). Both Solomon and Rodell have been all but forgotten. What, indeed, have we wrought? Although Rodell predicted his original panning would have no effect, could he have anticipated the sheer dimensions of this worst-case scenario - that his "professional purveyors of pretentious poppycock" would have spawned so furiously, that the contemporary law reviews he collectively called "spinach" would have mushroomed into such a gargantuan souffle of airy irrelevance?Lo, the voices are heard once again in the wilderness, from the bewildered among us innocent (or ignorant) enough to try writing the wrongs perpetrated in the name of Scholarship.

12 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines the tension between free speech and historical revisionism, presenting various arguments in deference to principles of liberty and opposed to group defamation, including psychological and geopolitical analyses of denial and anti-Semitism.
Abstract: Today that form of historical revisionism popularly called “Holocaust denial” abounds worldwide in all its full foul flourish—disseminated not only on Arab streets but in American university newspapers, not only in books, articles, and speeches but in mosques and over the Internet. Can we reject spurious revisionism, or punish purposeful expressions of hatred, and still pay homage to the liberty of thought ennobled by the First Amendment? Are some conflicts between freedom of expression and civility as insoluble as they are inevitable? Can history ever be proven as Truth? This article attempts to answer those questions. Part I describes the background and nature of Holocaust denial, tracing the Nazis’ adoption of a plan for the “Final Solution of the Jewish Problem” through the post-War Nuremberg Trials to the present day. Part II examines the tension between free speech and historical revisionism, presenting various arguments in deference to principles of liberty and opposed to group defamation. Part III addresses the quest for truth in a free society, including psychological and geopolitical analyses of denial and anti-Semitism.

12 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the negative effects of law schools' preoccupations with enhancing their image and marketing strategy, especially as they are reflected in both scholarship and academic freedom, are demonstrated.
Abstract: This article seeks to demonstrate the negative effects of law schools’ preoccupations with enhancing their image and marketing strategy, especially as they are reflected in both scholarship and academic freedom.

7 citations

01 Jan 1984
TL;DR: The year 1984 may not have fulfilled Orwellian prophecies of governmental totalitarianism, but citizens of the world remain no less concerned about the quality of their civil liberties than they were in 1984 as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The year 1984 may not have fulfilled Orwellian prophecies of governmental totalitarianism, but citizens of the world remain no less concerned about the quality of their civil liberties. If people could live peacefully and productively together under a strict caste system, or blissfully in enslavement, there would be little impetus to identify 'natural rights' nor insistence upon what we know as 'freedom.' But human experience has amply demonstrated the universal yearning for personal liberty, as well as the need to legislate against its deprivation.Thus Big Brother has been the enemy from long before the Magna Carta and long since the Bill of Rights.Punishment of racial defamation has not jeopardized freedom elsewhere. Neither would democracy suffer in America, were Nazis prohibited from marching in Skokie.

6 citations


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is concluded that sensori-motor cortices are activated during a variety of language comprehension tasks, for both concrete and abstract language, and should be incorporated into models of the neurocognitive architecture of language.
Abstract: Do people use sensori-motor cortices to understand language? Here we review neurocognitive studies of language comprehension in healthy adults and evaluate their possible contributions to theories of language in the brain. We start by sketching the minimal predictions that an embodied theory of language understanding makes for empirical research, and then survey studies that have been offered as evidence for embodied semantic representations. We explore four debated issues: first, does activation of sensori-motor cortices during action language understanding imply that action semantics relies on mirror neurons? Second, what is the evidence that activity in sensori-motor cortices plays a functional role in understanding language? Third, to what extent do responses in perceptual and motor areas depend on the linguistic and extra-linguistic context? And finally, can embodied theories accommodate language about abstract concepts? Based on the available evidence, we conclude that sensori-motor cortices are activated during a variety of language comprehension tasks, for both concrete and abstract language. Yet, this activity depends on the context in which perception and action words are encountered. Although modality-specific cortical activity is not a sine qua non of language processing even for language about perception and action, sensori-motor regions of the brain appear to make functional contributions to the construction of meaning, and should therefore be incorporated into models of the neurocognitive architecture of language.

131 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the structure of contemporary anti-Semitic beliefs in Poland and evaluate their predictive role in discriminatory intentions and behavior targeting Jews, and determine dispositional, situational, and identity correlates of different forms of antiSemitic beliefs and behavior.
Abstract: The harmfulness of anti-Semitic beliefs is widely discussed in current political and legal debates (e.g., Cutler v. Dorn). At the same time, empirical studies of the psychological consequences of such beliefs are scarce. The present research is an attempt to explore the structure of contemporary anti-Semitic beliefs in Poland—and to evaluate their predictive role in discriminatory intentions and behavior targeting Jews. Another aim was to determine dispositional, situational, and identity correlates of different forms of anti-Semitic beliefs and behavior. Study 1, performed on a nation-wide representative sample of Polish adults (N = 979), suggests a three-factorial structure of anti-Semitic beliefs, consisting of: (1) belief in Jewish conspiracy, (2) traditional religious anti-Judaic beliefs, and (3) secondary anti-Semitic beliefs, focusing on Holocaust commemoration. Of these three beliefs, belief in Jewish conspiracy was the closest antecedent of anti-Semitic behavioral intentions. Study 2 (N = 600 Internet users in Poland) confirmed the three-factor structure of anti-Semitic beliefs and proved that these beliefs explain actual behavior toward Jews in monetary donations. Both studies show that anti-Semitic beliefs are related to authoritarian personality characteristics, victimhood-based social identity, and relative deprivation.

120 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Steven Shapin1
TL;DR: A historical survey of how and why the notion of the Ivory Tower became part of twentieth-and twenty-first-century cultural vocabularies is given in this article, where the authors track the origins of the tag in antiquity, document its nineteenth-century resurgence in literary and aesthetic culture, and more carefully assesses the political and intellectual circumstances, especially in the 1930s and 1940s, in which it became a common phrase attached to universities and to features of science and became a way of criticizing practices and institutions deemed to be ‘irrelevant'.
Abstract: This is a historical survey of how and why the notion of the Ivory Tower became part of twentieth- and twenty-first-century cultural vocabularies. It very briefly tracks the origins of the tag in antiquity, documents its nineteenth-century resurgence in literary and aesthetic culture, and more carefully assesses the political and intellectual circumstances, especially in the 1930s and 1940s, in which it became a common phrase attached to universities and to features of science and in which it became a way of criticizing practices and institutions deemed to be ‘irrelevant’. The paper concludes by reflecting on the tag's relationship to pervasive cultural tropes and how its modern history may be used to appreciate better where science and its academic setting now stand in the ancient debate between the active and contemplative lives.

88 citations

01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In case of a legitimate complaint, the Library will make the material inaccessible and/or remove it from the website as discussed by the authors, in case of legitimate complaints the material will be removed.
Abstract: Disclaimer/Complaints regulations If you believe that digital publication of certain material infringes any of your rights or (privacy) interests, please let the Library know, stating your reasons. In case of a legitimate complaint, the Library will make the material inaccessible and/or remove it from the website. Please Ask the Library: https://uba.uva.nl/en/contact, or a letter to: Library of the University of Amsterdam, Secretariat, Singel 425, 1012 WP Amsterdam, The Netherlands. You will be contacted as soon as possible.

74 citations