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Author

Kevin M. Kruse

Other affiliations: Cornell University
Bio: Kevin M. Kruse is an academic researcher from Princeton University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Public space & Politics. The author has an hindex of 7, co-authored 9 publications receiving 671 citations. Previous affiliations of Kevin M. Kruse include Cornell University.

Papers
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Book
02 Oct 2005
TL;DR: From Radicalism to "Respectability": Race, Residence, and Segregationist Strategy 42 C HAPTER Three: From Community to Individuality: Race, residence, and segregationist Ideology 78 CHAPTER Four: The Abandonment of Public Space: Desegregation, Privatization, and the ax Revolt 105 CHAPTER Five: The Second Battle of Atlanta: Massive Resistance and the Divided Middle Class 131 CHAPTER Six: The Fight for "Freedom of Association": School Deseggregation and White Withdrawal 161 CHAPTER SEVEN: Collapse of
Abstract: List of Illustrations ix Acknowledgments xi Introduction 3 CHAPTER ONE: "The City oo Busy to Hate": Atlanta and the Politics of Progress 19 CHAPTER TWO: From Radicalism to "Respectability": Race, Residence, and Segregationist Strategy 42 C HAPTER THREE: From Community to Individuality: Race, Residence, and Segregationist Ideology 78 CHAPTER FOUR: The Abandonment of Public Space: Desegregation, Privatization, and the ax Revolt 105 CHAPTER FIVE: The "Second Battle of Atlanta": Massive Resistance and the Divided Middle Class 131 CHAPTER SIX: The Fight for "Freedom of Association": School Desegregation and White Withdrawal 161 CHAPTER SEVEN: Collapse of the Coalition: Sit-Ins and the Business Rebellion 180 CHAPTER EIGHT: "The Law of the Land": Federal Intervention and the Civil Rights Act 205 CHAPTER NINE: City Limits: Urban Separatism and Suburban Secession 234 EPILOGUE: The Legacies of White Flight 259 List of Abbreviations 267 Notes 269 Index 313

334 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: Kruse and Sugrue as discussed by the authors argued that the seemingly calm streets of suburban America were, in fact, battlegrounds over race, class, and politics, and argued that suburbia must be understood as a central factor in the modern American experience.
Abstract: America has become a nation of suburbs. Confronting the popular image of suburbia as simply a refuge for affluent whites, "The New Suburban History" rejects the stereotypes of a conformist and conflict-free suburbia. The seemingly calm streets of suburbia were, in fact, battlegrounds over race, class, and politics. With this collection, Kevin Kruse and Thomas Sugrue argue that suburbia must be understood as a central factor in the modern American experience. Kruse and Sugrue, here, collect ten essays - augmented by their provocative introduction - that challenge our understanding of suburbia. Drawing from original research on suburbs across the country, the contributors recast important political and social issues in the context of suburbanization. Their essays reveal the role suburbs have played in the transformation of American liberalism and conservatism; the contentious politics of race, class, and ethnicity; and debates about the environment, land use, and taxation. The contributors move the history of African Americans, Latinos, Asians, and blue-collar workers from the margins to the mainstream of suburban history. From this broad perspective, these innovative historians explore the way suburbs affect - and are affected by - central cities, competing suburbs, and entire regions. The results, they show, are far-reaching: the emergence of a suburban America has reshaped national politics, fostered new social movements, and remade the American landscape. "The New Suburban History" offers nothing less than a new American history - one that claims the nation cannot be fully understood without a history of American suburbs at its very center.

120 citations

Book
14 Apr 2015
TL;DR: The Great Crusades: Prayer and Politics in Postwar America Part II: Consecration 3. "Government Under God" 4. Pledging Allegiance 5. Pitchmen for Piety Part III: Conflict 6. "Whose Religious Tradition?" 7. "Our So-Called Religious Leaders" 8. "Which Side Are You On?" Epilogue
Abstract: Introduction Part I: Creation 1. "Freedom Under God" 2. The Great Crusades: Prayer and Politics in Postwar America Part II: Consecration 3. "Government Under God" 4. Pledging Allegiance 5. Pitchmen for Piety Part III: Conflict 6. "Whose Religious Tradition?" 7. "Our So-Called Religious Leaders" 8. "Which Side Are You On?" Epilogue

84 citations

Book
01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: Prakash et al. as discussed by the authors described the spatial and cultural politics of Los Angeles' Watts Towers, and showed that the city as a theater of protest in West Berlin and West Germany, 1962-1983.
Abstract: List of Illustrations vii Preface ix Introduction by Gyan Prakash 1 SPATIAL IMAGINARIES 19 Chapter 1: Streets, Imaginaries, and Modernity: Vienna Is Not Berlin by David Frisby 21 Chapter 2: The Global Spaces of Los Angeles, 1920s-1930s by Philip J. Ethington 58 Chapter 3: Architecture at the Ends of Empire: Urban Reflections between Algiers and Marseille by Sheila Crane 99 Chapter 4: The City in Fragments: Kaleidoscopic Johannesburg after Apartheid by Martin J. Murray 144 SPATIAL POLITICS 179 Chapter 5: Violence and Spatial Politics between the Local and Imperial: Baghdad, 1778-1810 by Dina Rizk Khoury 181 Chapter 6: From the Lettered City to the Sellers' City: Vendor Politics and Public Space in Urban Mexico, 1880-1926 by Christina M. Jime'nez 214 Chapter 7: The City as Theater of Protest: West Berlin and West Germany, 1962-1983 by Belinda Davis 247 Chapter 8: Nuestro Pueblo: The Spatial and Cultural Politics of Los Angeles' Watts Towers by Sarah Schrank 275 SPACES OF EVERYDAY LIFE 311 Chapter 9: Morality, Majesty, and Murder in 1950s London: Metropolitan Culture and English Modernity by Frank Mort 313 Chapter 10: (Re)Imagining an African City: Performing Culture, Arts, and Citizenship in Dakar (Senegal), 1980-2000 by Mamadou Diouf 346 Chapter 11: Street Observation Science and the Tokyo Economic Bubble, 1986-1990 by Jordan Sand 373 Chapter 12: Spectacle and Death in the City of Bombay Cinema by Ranjani Mazumdar 401 Contributors 433 Index 437

59 citations

MonographDOI
01 Feb 2012
TL;DR: In this paper, the Second World War and the Civil Rights Movement are discussed, with a focus on women's roles in the movement and the role of women in the war effort.
Abstract: Contributors Introduction: The Second World War and the Civil Rights Movement- Kevin M. Kruse and Stephen Tuck Chapter 1: Freedom to Want: The Federal Government and Politicized Consumption in World War II- James T. Sparrow Chapter 2: Confronting the Roadblock: Congress, Civil Rights and World War II- Julian E. Zelizer Chapter 3: Segregation and the City: White Supremacy in Alabama in the Mid-Twentieth Century- J. Mills Thornton III Chapter 4: Movement Building during the World War II Era: The NAACP's Legal Insurgency in the South- Patricia Sullivan Chapter 5: Hillburn, Hattiesburg, and Hitler: Wartime Activists Think Globally and Act Locally- Thomas Sugrue Chapter 6: "You can sing and punch EL but you can't be a soldier or a man": African American Struggles for a New Place in Popular Culture- Stephen Tuck Chapter 7: "A War for States' Rights": The White Supremacist Vision of Double Victory- Jason Morgan Ward Chapter 8: The Sexual Politics of Race in WWII America- Jane Dailey Chapter 9: Civil Rights and World War II in a Global Frame: Shape-shifting Racial Formations and the U.S. Encounter with European and Japanese Colonialism- Penny Von Eschen Chapter 10: Race, Rights, and Non-Governmental Organizations at the UN San Francisco Conference: A Contested History of "Human Rights ... without discrimination"- Elizabeth Borgwardt Chapter 11: "Did the Battlefield Kill Jim Crow?": The Cold War Military, Civil Rights, and Black Freedom Struggles- Kimberley L. Phillips

41 citations


Cited by
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BookDOI
01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: Part of the courts, criminal law, criminal procedure, criminology, Law and Society Commons, Law Enforcement and Corrections Commons, Legislation Commons, Politics and Social Change Commons, and the Race and Ethnicity Commons.
Abstract: How does access to this work benefit you? Let us know! Follow this and additional works at: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/jj_pubs Part of the Courts Commons, Criminal Law Commons, Criminal Procedure Commons, Criminology Commons, Judges Commons, Law and Politics Commons, Law and Society Commons, Law Enforcement and Corrections Commons, Legislation Commons, Politics and Social Change Commons, and the Race and Ethnicity Commons

916 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: This paper developed the politicized places hypothesis, an alternative that focuses on how national and local conditions interact to construe immigrants as threatening, and tested the hypothesis using new data on local anti-immigrant policies.
Abstract: In ethnic and racial terms, America is growing rapidly more diverse. Yet attempts to extend racial threat hypotheses to today’s immigrants have generated inconsistent results. This article develops the politicized places hypothesis, an alternative that focuses on how national and local conditions interact to construe immigrants as threatening. Hostile political reactions to neighboring immigrants are most likely when communities undergo sudden influxes of immigrants and when salient national rhetoric reinforces the threat. Data from several sources, including twelve geocoded surveys from 1992 to 2009, provide consistent support for this approach. Time-series cross-sectional and panel data allow the analysis to exploit exogenous shifts in salient national issues such as the September 11 attacks, reducing the problem of residential self-selection and other threats to validity. The article also tests the hypothesis using new data on local anti-immigrant policies. By highlighting the interaction of local and national conditions, the politicized places hypothesis can explain both individual attitudes and local political outcomes.

787 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article developed the politicized places hypothesis, an alternative that focuses on how national and local conditions interact to construe immigrants as threatening, and tested the hypothesis using new data on local anti-immigrant policies.
Abstract: In ethnic and racial terms, America is growing rapidly more diverse. Yet attempts to extend racial threat hypotheses to today's immigrants have generated inconsistent results. This article develops the politicized places hypothesis, an alternative that focuses on how national and local conditions interact to construe immigrants as threatening. Hostile political reactions to neighboring immigrants are most likely when communities undergo sudden influxes of immigrants and when salient national rhetoric reinforces the threat. Data from several sources, including twelve geocoded surveys from 1992 to 2009, provide consistent support for this approach. Time-series cross-sectional and panel data allow the analysis to exploit exogenous shifts in salient national issues such as the September 11 attacks, reducing the problem of residential self-selection and other threats to validity. The article also tests the hypothesis using new data on local anti-immigrant policies. By highlighting the interaction of local and national conditions, the politicized places hypothesis can explain both individual attitudes and local political outcomes.

762 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a study of decision makers in a community power structure is presented, where the authors show how to read a book even for only a few minutes to explore the knowledge.
Abstract: Spend your time even for only few minutes to read a book. Reading a book will never reduce and waste your time to be useless. Reading, for some people become a need that is to do every day such as spending time for eating. Now, what about you? Do you like to read a book? Now, we will show you a new book enPDFd community power structure a study of decision makers that can be a new way to explore the knowledge. When reading this book, you can get one thing to always remember in every reading time, even step by step.

300 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Kruse found that white flight, the decades-long movement of whites to the Atlanta suburbs, was not only the result of this struggle over space; it was also the source of a new form of southern white conservatism based on whites' resentful exit from the urban South as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism. By Kevin M. Kruse. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005. 352p. 18.95 paper.The South is a region of many myths, and Kevin Kruse takes on one of the most durable of them: Atlanta as the “city too busy to hate.” Kruse finds that Atlanta, like many other southern and northern cities in the postwar era, was a city in which “race and residence stood at the forefront of [Atlanta's] racial politics” (p. 42). He traces the ultimately unsuccessful efforts of Mayor William Hartsfield's biracial, elite-controlled regime to manage the struggle between whites and blacks over urban space. White flight, the decades-long movement of whites to the Atlanta suburbs, was not only the result of this struggle over space; it was also the source of a new form of southern white conservatism based on whites' resentful exit from the urban South. For political scientists, this book is a reminder of the “long civil rights movement,” that began in the 1940s, before the Brown decision, and extended throughout the 1970s. At the local level, the Civil Rights movement was a struggle over politics that earlier political scientists would be quick to understand and appreciate: a struggle over who gets what, when, where, and how. By taking an in-depth yet rigorous look at southern politics that goes beyond the limitations of National Election Study data or roll-call votes, the book provides valuable historical context to recent works on the transformation of southern politics.

288 citations