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Kiara M. Vigil

Bio: Kiara M. Vigil is an academic researcher from Amherst College. The author has contributed to research in topics: Internal colonialism & Sovereignty. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 5 publications receiving 86 citations.

Papers
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MonographDOI
Kiara M. Vigil1
01 Jul 2015
TL;DR: Vigil as discussed by the authors examines the literary output of four influential American Indian intellectuals who challenged long-held conceptions of Indian identity at the turn of the twentieth century and traces how the narrative discourses created by these figures spurred wider discussions about citizenship, race, and modernity in the United States.
Abstract: In the United States of America today, debates among, between, and within Indian nations continue to focus on how to determine and define the boundaries of Indian ethnic identity and tribal citizenship. From the 1880s and into the 1930s, many Native people participated in similar debates as they confronted white cultural expectations regarding what it meant to be an Indian in modern American society. Using close readings of texts, images, and public performances, this book examines the literary output of four influential American Indian intellectuals who challenged long-held conceptions of Indian identity at the turn of the twentieth century. Kiara M. Vigil traces how the narrative discourses created by these figures spurred wider discussions about citizenship, race, and modernity in the United States. Vigil demonstrates how these figures deployed aspects of Native American cultural practice to authenticate their status both as indigenous peoples and as citizens of the United States.

65 citations

Book ChapterDOI
Kiara M. Vigil1
01 Jul 2015
Book ChapterDOI
Kiara M. Vigil1
01 Jul 2015

Cited by
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01 Jan 1992
TL;DR: The body politics of Julia Kristeva and the Body Politics of JuliaKristeva as discussed by the authors are discussed in detail in Section 5.1.1 and Section 6.2.1.
Abstract: Preface (1999) Preface (1990) 1. Subjects of Sex/Gender/Desire I. 'Women' as the Subject of Feminism II. The Compulsory Order of Sex/Gender/Desire III. Gender: The Circular Ruins of Contemporary Debate IV. Theorizing the Binary, the Unitary and Beyond V. Identity, Sex and the Metaphysics of Substance VI. Language, Power and the Strategies of Displacement 2. Prohibition, Psychoanalysis, and the Production of the Heterosexual Matrix I. Structuralism's Critical Exchange II. Lacan, Riviere, and the Strategies of Masquerade III. Freud and the Melancholia of Gender IV. Gender Complexity and the Limits of Identification V. Reformulating Prohibition as Power 3. Subversive Bodily Acts I. The Body Politics of Julia Kristeva II. Foucault, Herculine, and the Politics of Sexual Discontinuity III. Monique Wittig - Bodily Disintegration and Fictive Sex IV. Bodily Inscriptions, Performative Subversions Conclusion - From Parody to Politics

1,125 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Rydell as mentioned in this paper argues that America's early world's fairs actually served to legitimate racial exploitation at home and the creation of an empire abroad and looks in particular to the "ethnological" displays of non-whites, set up by showmen but endorsed by prominent anthropologists.
Abstract: Robert W. Rydell contends that America's early world's fairs actually served to legitimate racial exploitation at home and the creation of an empire abroad. He looks in particular to the \"ethnological\" displays of nonwhites-set up by showmen but endorsed by prominent anthropologists-which lent scientific credibility to popular racial attitudes and helped build public support for domestic and foreign policies. Rydell's lively and thought-provoking study draws on archival records, newspaper and magazine articles, guidebooks, popular novels, and oral histories.

278 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
24 Apr 2018
TL;DR: In this article, the spatial and racial politics of the environmental justice movement in the United States by linking it to abolitionist theories that have emerged from the Black Radica is discussed.
Abstract: In this article, we rethink the spatial and racial politics of the environmental justice movement in the United States by linking it to abolitionist theories that have emerged from the Black Radica...

123 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Uneven Ground: American Indian Sovereignty and Federal Law and Religious Freedom and Indian Rights: The Case of Oregon v. Smith provide a comprehensive and understandable primer on the peculiar legal status of American Indians as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Uneven Ground: American Indian Sovereignty and Federal Law and Religious Freedom and Indian Rights: The Case of Oregon v. Smith provide a comprehensive and understandable primer on the peculiar legal status of American Indians. Uneven Ground provides a general overview of the relationship between the federal government and Native American tribes, while Religious Freedom and Indian Rights embodies this relationship by tracing the circuitous legal route followed by Alfred Leo Smith, a Klamath Indian and a member of the Native American Church, who was challenging an Oregon law outlawing the use of peyote. In addition to highlighting Native American legal issues, both books provide an understandable description of the workings of the federal legal system from the circuit level to the United States Supreme Court. These books would assist legal scholars, Native American historians, political scientists, and those interested in the inner workings of the federal court system. Uneven Ground: American Indian Sovereignty and Federal Law, by David Wilkins and K. Tsianina Lomawaima, attempts to \"reach some understanding of the contest between sovereigns, between tribes and the United States\" (10). They identify six critical legal doctrines pertinent to Native Americans: the doctrine of discovery, the trust doctrine, the doctrine of plenary power, the reserved rights doctrine, the doctrine of implied appeals, and the doctrine of sovereign immunity. Wilkins and Lomawaima use these legal ideas to divide the text into discrete chapters. In each chapter the authors provide a nuanced, informed, and clear description of the specific doctrine and show how it has affected native peoples throughout American history. Their arguments are strengthened and clarified by placing the legal doctrine in an historical context, explaining the contradictory application of the doctrine by the federal government and evaluating the legal ramifications of major court cases dealing with these doctrines. The chapters are freestanding discourses on each of the doctrines, and the authors have achieved an enviable goal in a study of this nature: impeccable research, clarity of prose, balance of presentation, and scholarly objectivity. The concluding chapter of the book (most useful for those seeking a quick and clear analysis of tribal-federal relationship) provides a concise review of the entire text with a synopsis of the six legal doctrines discussed in the narrative.

105 citations