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Kim Halskov Madsen

Bio: Kim Halskov Madsen is an academic researcher from Aarhus University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Usability & Usability engineering. The author has an hindex of 13, co-authored 25 publications receiving 807 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Aug 1988
TL;DR: The theoretical perspective on design as cooperative work is outlined, the historical roots of the program are sketched --- the Scandinavian collective resource approach to design and use of computer artifacts, and some critical reflections on the rationality of computer support for cooperative work are made.
Abstract: Computer support for design as cooperative work is the subject of our discussion in the context of our research program on Computer Support in Cooperative Design and Communication. We outline our theoretical perspective on design as cooperative work, and we exemplify our approach with reflections from a project on computer support for envisionment in design --- the APLEX and its use. We see envisionment facilities as support for both experiments with and communication about the future use situation. As a background we sketch the historical roots of our program --- the Scandinavian collective resource approach to design and use of computer artifacts, and make some critical reflections on the rationality of computer support for cooperative work.

123 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work illustrates how use continuously develops in a complex interplay between the users' expectations---as they are formed and triggered by the design---and the needs and context of use per se.
Abstract: Current work in the field of usability tends to focus on snapshots of use as the basis for evaluating designs. However, giving due consideration to the fact that everyday use of technology involves a process of evolution, we set out to investigate how the design of the technology may be used to support this. Based on a long-term empirical study of television use in the homes of two families, we illustrate how use continuously develops in a complex interplay between the users' expectations---as they are formed and triggered by the design---and the needs and context of use per se. We analyze the empirical data from the perspective of activity theory. This framework serves to highlight how use develops, and it supports our analysis and discussion about how design, the users' backgrounds, previous experience, and needs, and the specific context of use supports or hinders the development of use. Moreover, we discuss how the characteristics of the home settings, in which the televisions studied were situated, represent a challenge to usability work. The concluding discussion leads to a set of hypotheses relevant to designers and researchers who wish to tackle some of the aspects of usability of particular importance to development in the use of home technology.

80 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1988
TL;DR: The theoretical perspective on design as cooperative work is outlined, the historical roots of the program are sketched — the Scandinavian collective resource approach to design and use of computer artifacts, and some critical reflections on the rationality of computer support for cooperative work are made.
Abstract: Computer support for design as cooperative work is the subject of our discussion in the context of our research program on Computer Support in Cooperative Design and Communication. We outline our theoretical perspective on design as cooperative work, and we exemplify our approach with reflections from a project on computer support for envisionment in design — the APLEX and its use. We see envisionment facilities as support for both experiments with and communication about the future use situation. As a background we sketch the historical roots of our program — the Scandinavian collective resource approach to design and use of computer artifacts, and make some critical reflections on the rationality of computer support for cooperative work.

78 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: TH e i n t e r f a c e s o f c o m p u r e r s e r e c e r m e r i n e c t a r e f e r c e m e c o n e r t a i n E r e l e c c t r e e r o n i c t s a r E f r e q u e q e e e n t a e m p e r E c e t e e m b e e ing a r g e t
Abstract: T h e i n t e r f a c e s o f c o m p u t e r s y s t e m s e m b e d d e d in c e r t a i n t y p e s o f c o n s u m e r e l e c t r o n i c p r o d u c t s a r e f r e q u e n t l y t a r g e t s o f c r i t i c i s m . P e r h a P S t h e m o s t f r e q u e n t l y c i t e d e x a m p l e s o f p o o r u s e r i n t e r f a c e s (UIS) a r e t h o s e a s s o c i a t e d w i t h v i d e o c a s s e t t e r e c o r d e r s (VCRS).

58 citations


Cited by
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Journal Article

3,099 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: C categories and examples of groupware are described and some underlying research and development issues are discussed and GROVE, a novel group editor, is explained in some detail as a salient groupware example.
Abstract: Groupware reflects a change in emphasis from using the computer to solve problems to using the computer to facilitate human interaction. This article describes categories and examples of groupware and discusses some underlying research and development issues. GROVE, a novel group editor, is explained in some detail as a salient groupware example

2,891 citations

Book
20 Oct 2001
TL;DR: Usability Engineering: Scenario-Based Development of Human-Computer Interaction as discussed by the authors focuses on the realities of product development, showing how user interaction scenarios can make usability practices an integral part of interactive system development.
Abstract: Usability Engineering: Scenario-Based Development of Human-Computer Interaction is a radical departure from traditional books that emphasize theory and address experts. This book focuses on the realities of product development, showing how user interaction scenarios can make usability practices an integral part of interactive system development. As you'll learn, usability engineering is not the application of inflexible rules; it's a process of analysis, prototyping, and problem solving in which you evaluate tradeoffs, make reasoned decisions, and maximize the overall value of your product.

1,170 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper notes the importance of usable systems and promotes the process of human-centred design as a way to achieve them by adopting the framework of ISO 13407 along with a set of usability methods to support it.
Abstract: This paper notes the importance of usable systems and promotes the process of human-centred design as a way to achieve them. Adopting the framework of ISO 13407, each of the main processes in the human-centred design cycle is considered in turn along with a set of usability methods to support it. These methods are briefly described with references to further information. Each set of methods is also presented in a table format to enable the reader to compare and select them for different design situations.

1,004 citations

BookDOI
Michael Muller1
01 Jan 2002
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors propose to add users and stir participants in participatory design, which is based on the idea of Just Add Users and Stir (Just-Add-Users and Stir).
Abstract: Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166Just Add Users and Stir? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166Major Bibliographic Sources for Participatory Design . . .167

918 citations