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Kimberly Wanxian Soh

Bio: Kimberly Wanxian Soh is an academic researcher from National University of Singapore. The author has contributed to research in topics: Mandarin Chinese & Word recognition. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 1 citations.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: None of the currently available materials contain word lists that can be readily adapted for re-recording with the voice of a Singapore Mandarin speaker, and there is a need to develop original Singapore Mandarin speech recognition test materials.
Abstract: This study aimed to evaluate word lists of current Mandarin speech recognition test materials on their adaptability for use on adult Singapore Mandarin speakers. This scoping review involved litera...

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , a set of word lists for testing speakers of Singapore Mandarin was developed over three phases. But these word lists need to be validated with normal hearing and hearing-impaired Singapore Mandarin speakers before they can be used clinically.
Abstract: Background Word recognition tests must be conducted in the native language of the listener to obtain valid word recognition scores. Existing Singapore Mandarin speech audiometry test materials that are disyllabic lack in sensitivity and are not phonologically balanced. Objective The purpose of this study was to address those limitations and develop a set of word lists for testing speakers of Singapore Mandarin. Methods The word lists were developed over three phases. (1) Frequently occurring words were chosen from a database consisting of subtitles from local Mandarin programmes, and subjected to familiarity rating by 50 native Singapore Mandarin speakers. (2) Phonologically balanced word lists were created and professionally recorded using words rated as familiar in phase 1. (3) Psychometric curves of words were obtained from 20 normal-hearing native speakers and word lists were analysed for perceptual equivalence. Results Sixteen phonologically balanced word lists consisting of 25 monosyllables each were created in phase 2. Eight of the 16 lists were found to be perceptually equivalent. Conclusion Word lists developed in this study addressed the limitations of existing Singapore Mandarin speech audiometry materials. The word lists need to be validated with normal-hearing and hearing-impaired Singapore Mandarin speakers before they can be used clinically.

Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , a set of word lists for testing speakers of Singapore Mandarin was developed over three phases. But these word lists need to be validated with normal hearing and hearing-impaired Singapore Mandarin speakers before they can be used clinically.
Abstract: Background Word recognition tests must be conducted in the native language of the listener to obtain valid word recognition scores. Existing Singapore Mandarin speech audiometry test materials that are disyllabic lack in sensitivity and are not phonologically balanced. Objective The purpose of this study was to address those limitations and develop a set of word lists for testing speakers of Singapore Mandarin. Methods The word lists were developed over three phases. (1) Frequently occurring words were chosen from a database consisting of subtitles from local Mandarin programmes, and subjected to familiarity rating by 50 native Singapore Mandarin speakers. (2) Phonologically balanced word lists were created and professionally recorded using words rated as familiar in phase 1. (3) Psychometric curves of words were obtained from 20 normal-hearing native speakers and word lists were analysed for perceptual equivalence. Results Sixteen phonologically balanced word lists consisting of 25 monosyllables each were created in phase 2. Eight of the 16 lists were found to be perceptually equivalent. Conclusion Word lists developed in this study addressed the limitations of existing Singapore Mandarin speech audiometry materials. The word lists need to be validated with normal-hearing and hearing-impaired Singapore Mandarin speakers before they can be used clinically.