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Kinga Kiwała

Bio: Kinga Kiwała is an academic researcher from Academy of Music in Kraków. The author has contributed to research in topics: Modernism (music) & Tonality. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 4 citations.

Papers
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2017
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on a problem of "New Romanticism" in Polish music based on the example of works of three composers referred to as the "Stalowa Wola Generation" (the name derives from the place of their debut, i.e. the Young Musicians for the Young Town Festival in Staloga Wola in 1976) or "Generation 51" (from the year of birth of the composers).
Abstract: The subject matter of the paper focuses around a problem of “New Romanticism” in Polish music based on the example of works of three composers referred to as the “Stalowa Wola Generation” (the name derives from the place of their debut, i.e. the Young Musicians for the Young Town Festival in Stalowa Wola in 1976) or “Generation 51” (from the year of birth of the composers). They constituted the first generation phenomenon of such significance in Polish music since the debut of “Generation 33” (Penderecki, Gorecki and others). The musical style of these young authors was in tune with the Polish popular phenomenon of 1970s of “New Romanticism”, consisting in returning to certain artistic and aesthetic values lost in modernism and the avant-garde. Relying on the examples of mostly earlier works of Eugeniusz Knapik, Aleksander Lason and Andrzej Krzanowski, an attempt is made to interpret the “syndrome” of this phenomenon—including the return to melodics, neo-modality and tonality, and the humanistic message of the compositions.

4 citations


Cited by
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Book
03 Oct 2019
TL;DR: In this article, Weinberg's works written in Soviet Russia compare with those of his Polish contemporaries; how one composer split from his national tradition and how he created a style that embraced the music of a new homeland, while those composers in his native land surged ahead in a more experimental vein.
Abstract: Mieczyslaw Weinberg left his family behind and fled his native Poland in September 1939. He reached the Soviet Union, where he become one of the most celebrated composers. He counted Shostakovich among his close friends and produced a prolific output of works. Yet he remained mindful of the nation that he had left. This book examines how Weinberg's works written in Soviet Russia compare with those of his Polish contemporaries; how one composer split from his national tradition and how he created a style that embraced the music of a new homeland, while those composers in his native land surged ahead in a more experimental vein. The points of contact between them are enlightening for both sides. This study provides an overview of Weinberg's music through his string quartets, analysing them alongside Polish composers. Composers featured include Bacewicz, Meyer, Lutoslawski, Panufnik, Penderecki, Gorecki, and a younger generation, including Szymanski and Knapik.

15 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Oct 2019
TL;DR: At noon on 19 April (Easter Sunday) 1903, to the accompaniment of a peal of church bells, drunkenness turned to rioting in Kishinev (now known as Chișinău, in modern day Moldova) as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: At noon on 19 April (Easter Sunday) 1903, to the accompaniment of a peal of church bells, drunkenness turned to rioting in Kishinev (now known as Chișinău, in modern day Moldova). Kishinev had a large Jewish population (at nearly 50,000, almost half the town), but over the nineteenth century, it had endured waves of anti-Semitic hatred that spanned all of imperial Russia.

4 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Oct 2019
Book ChapterDOI
01 Oct 2019