scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Krishan Kumar Chawla

Bio: Krishan Kumar Chawla is an academic researcher from University of Alabama at Birmingham. The author has contributed to research in topics: Glass fiber & Ceramic matrix composite. The author has an hindex of 15, co-authored 48 publications receiving 4695 citations.

Papers
More filters
MonographDOI
06 Nov 2008
TL;DR: A balanced mechanics-materials approach and coverage of the latest developments in biomaterials and electronic materials, the new edition of this popular text is the most thorough and modern book available for upper-level undergraduate courses on the mechanical behavior of materials as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: A balanced mechanics-materials approach and coverage of the latest developments in biomaterials and electronic materials, the new edition of this popular text is the most thorough and modern book available for upper-level undergraduate courses on the mechanical behavior of materials To ensure that the student gains a thorough understanding the authors present the fundamental mechanisms that operate at micro- and nano-meter level across a wide-range of materials, in a way that is mathematically simple and requires no extensive knowledge of materials This integrated approach provides a conceptual presentation that shows how the microstructure of a material controls its mechanical behavior, and this is reinforced through extensive use of micrographs and illustrations New worked examples and exercises help the student test their understanding Further resources for this title, including lecture slides of select illustrations and solutions for exercises, are available online at wwwcambridgeorg/97800521866758

2,905 citations

Book
31 Jan 2003
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors describe some of the processing techniques for CMCs, followed by a description of some salient characteristics of CMC composites regarding interface and mechanical properties and, in particular, the various possible toughness mechanisms.
Abstract: Ceramic materials in general have a very attractive package of properties: high strength and high stiffness at very high temperatures, chemical inertness, low density, and so on. This attractive package is marred by one deadly flaw, namely, an utter lack of toughness. They are prone to catastrophic failures in the presence of flaws (surface or internal). They are extremely susceptible to thermal shock and are easily damaged during fabrication and/or service. It is therefore understandable that an overriding consideration in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) is to toughen the ceramics by incorporating fibers in them and thus exploit the attractive high-temperature strength and environmental resistance of ceramic materials without risking a catastrophic failure. It is worth pointing out at the very outset that there are certain basic differences between CMCs and other composites. The general philosophy in nonceramic matrix composites is to have the fiber bear a greater proportion of the applied load. This load partitioning depends on the ratio of fiber and matrix elastic moduli, Ef/Em. In nonceramic matrix composites, this ratio can be very high, while in CMCs, it is rather low and can be as low as unity; think of alumina fiber reinforced alumina matrix composite. Another distinctive point regarding CMCs is that because of limited matrix ductility and generally high fabrication temperature, thermal mismatch between components has a very important bearing on CMC performance. The problem of chemical compatibility between components in CMCs has ramifications similar to those in, say, MMCs. We first describe some of the processing techniques for CMCs, followed by a description of some salient characteristics of CMCs regarding interface and mechanical properties and, in particular, the various possible toughness mechanisms, and finally a description of some applications of CMCs.

509 citations

Book
02 Aug 1972
TL;DR: In this article, important techniques to process metal matrix composites are described, then the interface region and its characteristics, properties of different metal matrix composite composites, and finally, the authors summarize different applications of metal matrices composites.
Abstract: Metal matrix composites consist of a metal or an alloy as the continuous matrix and a reinforcement that can be particle, short fiber or whisker, or continuous fiber. In this chapter, we first describe important techniques to process metal matrix composites, then we describe the interface region and its characteristics, properties of different metal matrix composites, and finally, we summarize different applications of metal matrix composites.

264 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: With the advent of high performance thermoplastic polymers, structural applications for thermoplastic composites are increasing rapidly. Thermoplastic matrix composites possess distinct advantages vis-a-vis thermoset matrix composites in terms of recyclability, high specific strength and specific stiffness, corrosion resistance, enhanced impact toughness, cost effectiveness, and flexibility of design. Since 1990s, the number of material forms and combinations in fibre reinforced thermoplastic polymers has increased exponentially, thereby expanding application avenues in transportation, automotive, mass transit, marine, aerospace, military and construction sectors. In this paper we review the state of the art in processing of fibre reinforced thermoplastics. We start with a brief description of thermoplastic polymers used in structural applications followed by material forms and methods of impregnation of the reinforcement with polymer. Long fibre based processing methods are described next. A desc...

201 citations


Cited by
More filters
MonographDOI
06 Nov 2008
TL;DR: A balanced mechanics-materials approach and coverage of the latest developments in biomaterials and electronic materials, the new edition of this popular text is the most thorough and modern book available for upper-level undergraduate courses on the mechanical behavior of materials as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: A balanced mechanics-materials approach and coverage of the latest developments in biomaterials and electronic materials, the new edition of this popular text is the most thorough and modern book available for upper-level undergraduate courses on the mechanical behavior of materials To ensure that the student gains a thorough understanding the authors present the fundamental mechanisms that operate at micro- and nano-meter level across a wide-range of materials, in a way that is mathematically simple and requires no extensive knowledge of materials This integrated approach provides a conceptual presentation that shows how the microstructure of a material controls its mechanical behavior, and this is reinforced through extensive use of micrographs and illustrations New worked examples and exercises help the student test their understanding Further resources for this title, including lecture slides of select illustrations and solutions for exercises, are available online at wwwcambridgeorg/97800521866758

2,905 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the basic building blocks are described, starting with the 20 amino acids and proceeding to polypeptides, polysaccharides, and polyprotein-saccharide.

2,074 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a review of the fundamental aspects of electrophoretic deposition technique, factors influencing the deposition process, kinetic aspects, types of EPD, the driving forces, preconditioning electrophoreic suspension, stability and control of suspension, mechanisms involved in EPD and drying of deposits obtained by EPD are discussed.

1,827 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
17 Apr 2009-Science
TL;DR: An approach to optimize strength and ductility is outlined by identifying three essential structural characteristics for boundaries: coherency with surrounding matrix, thermal and mechanical stability, and smallest feature size finer than 100 nanometers.
Abstract: [Lu, K.; Lu, L.] Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Met Res, Shenyang Natl Lab Mat Sci, Shenyang 110016, Peoples R China. [Lu, L.; Suresh, S.] MIT, Sch Engn, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA.;Lu, K (reprint author), Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Met Res, Shenyang Natl Lab Mat Sci, Shenyang 110016, Peoples R China;lu@imr.ac.cn ssuresh@mit.edu

1,812 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the evolution of the new microstructures produced by two types of dynamic recrystallization is reviewed, including those brought about by severe plastic deformation (SPD).

1,777 citations