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Kuan Chia Lin

Bio: Kuan Chia Lin is an academic researcher from National Yang-Ming University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Quality of life & Population. The author has an hindex of 34, co-authored 130 publications receiving 3865 citations. Previous affiliations of Kuan Chia Lin include National Taipei University of Nursing and Health Science & Taipei Veterans General Hospital.


Papers
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Journal Article
TL;DR: Uric acid level is the key factor for prevention of gout and needs constant monitoring, and other contributing or possible etiologic factors such as alcohol consumption, diuretics use, and excess weight gain carry an increased risk of g out attack among patients with hyperuricemia.
Abstract: Objective To investigate the incidence of gout and the interaction between uric acid level and other risk factors in the development of gout. Methods Two hundred twenty-three asymptomatic hyperuricemic men initially studied in 1991-92 were reassessed in 1996-97. Gout was clinically diagnosed by a senior rheumatologist based on history and physical according to the clinical criteria of Wallace. Basic demographic and lifestyle variables as well as biochemical data were collected in both baseline and followup periods. Both the stability analysis and the analysis of repeated relationships were applied. Results The 5-year cumulative incidence of gout was 18.83% (42/223). The risk factors for gout based on the analysis of repeated relationships were uric acid level, alcohol consumption, use of diuretics, and obesity. The only predictor of gout at baseline was uric acid level. After adjusting for baseline uric acid level, followup uric acid increase, persistent alcohol consumption, use of diuretics in the followup period, and body mass index increase were independent predictors for gout among asymptomatic hyperuricemic men. Excessive alcohol consumption, particularly if occasional, was the most important factor in the development of gout, even when the concentration of uric acid level was below 8 mg/dl. Conclusion Uric acid level is the key factor for prevention of gout and needs constant monitoring. Other contributing or possible etiologic factors such as alcohol consumption, diuretics use, and excess weight gain carry an increased risk of gout attack among patients with hyperuricemia.

238 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that perceptions of quality of patient care and collaborative relationships were the most important predictors of job satisfaction for healthcare providers.
Abstract: Title. Job satisfaction and perceptions of quality of patient care, collaboration and teamwork in acute care hospitals. Aim. This paper is a report of a study conducted to compare levels of job satisfaction and perceptions of the quality of patient care, collaboration and teamwork among healthcare professionals in four acute care hospitals and to determine the factors associated with job satisfaction for physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals. Background. Positive inter-professional relationships improve quality of patient care and staff job satisfaction. Understanding how healthcare professionals perceive their relationships with each other, and identifying factors that affect their job satisfaction and perceptions of the quality patient care, inform quality improvements. Method. This cross-sectional survey study was conducted in four hospitals in Taiwan. Data were collected in 2007 and analysed using descriptive statistics, one-way anova with the Games-Howell post hoc test and stepwise regression analysis. Results. The survey was completed by 1475 respondent, giving a response rate of 52·2% (180 physicians, 1019 nurses and 276 other healthcare professionals). Physicians were more satisfied with their jobs (F = 26·75, P < 0·05) than either nurses or other healthcare professionals. Conversely, nurses perceived more positive collaborative relationships than did physicians or other healthcare professionals (F = 279·51, P < 0·05). Stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that perceptions of quality of patient care and collaborative relationships were the most important predictors of job satisfaction for healthcare providers. Conclusion. These findings provide important clues for improving interdisciplinary collaboration and ensuring quality patient care through good job satisfaction and teamwork among healthcare professionals in acute care hospitals.

194 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It was revealed that overweight children conferred increased risks of incident asthma as compared with non‐overweight children, and proposed mechanisms of gender difference could be through pulmonary mechanics, sleep disordered breathing and leptin.
Abstract: Summary The aims of our meta-analysis were (i) to quantify the predictability of childhood overweight and obesity on the risk of incident asthma; and (ii) to evaluate the gender difference on this relationship. The selection criteria included prospective cohort paediatric studies which use age- and sex-specific body mass index (BMI) as a measure of childhood overweight and the primary outcome of incident asthma. A total of 1,027 studies were initially identified through online database searches, and finally 6 studies met the inclusion criteria. The combined result of reported relative risk from the 6 included studies revealed that overweight children conferred increased risks of incident asthma as compared with non-overweight children (relative risk, 1.19; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03–1.37). The relationship was further elevated for obesity vs. non-obesity (relative risk, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.16–3.50). A dose–responsiveness of elevated BMI on asthma incidence was observed (P for trend, 0.004). Obese boys had a significantly larger effect than obese girls (relative risk, boys: 2.47; 95% CI, 1.57–3.87; girls: 1.25; 95% CI, 0.51–3.03), with significant dose-dependent effect. Proposed mechanisms of gender difference could be through pulmonary mechanics, sleep disordered breathing and leptin. Further research might be needed to better understand the exact mechanism of gender difference on the obesity–asthma relationship.

186 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: Risk factors for hyperuricemia tended to be different with respect to sex and age and alcohol consumption and central obesity were independent predictors of gout amonghyperuricemic subjects irrespective of uric acid level.
Abstract: Objective This is a population survey conducted in 1991-92 among residents aged > or =30 years in Kin-Hu, Kinmen, with a 77.7% response rate to study the prevalence of hyperuricemia and hyperuricemia associated gout. A stratified analysis based on sex and age was used to assess the interaction and analyze the associated risk factors for hyperuricemia and gout. Methods Hyperuricemia was defined as uric acid > or =7.0 mg/dl for men and > or =6.0 mg/dl for women. Gout was clinically diagnosed by a senior rheumatologist based on patient's history and examination according to the clinical criteria of Wallace. Basic demographic and lifestyle variables as well as biochemical data were collected. Results The prevalence of hyperuricemia was 25.8% (391/1515) in men and 15.0% (250/1670) in women. The prevalence of gout among hyperuricemic subjects was 11.5% for men and 3% for women. According to age spectrum, the risk factor for hyperuricemia was hyperlipidemia in young adults (30-39 yrs); lifestyle and some clinical syndromes played a significant role in middle aged persons (40-59 yrs). The different risk factors between the sexes in middle age were alcohol consumption effect in men and menopause effect in women. Impaired renal function and use of diuretics became the important factors in the elderly (> or =60 yrs). The risk factors for gout among either the general population or subjects with hyperuricemia were concentration of serum uric acid, alcohol consumption, and central obesity. Conclusion Risk factors for hyperuricemia tended to be different with respect to sex and age. Alcohol consumption and central obesity were independent predictors of gout among hyperuricemic subjects irrespective of uric acid level.

161 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Demoralization had more influence on suicidal ideation than depression did, and attention should be paid to highly demoralized patients with cancer or high demoralization comorbid with depression for the purposes of suicide evaluation and prevention.
Abstract: This study aims to study the effects of depression and demoralization on suicidal ideation and to determine the feasibility of the Distress Thermometer as a screening tool for patients with cancer who experience depression and demoralization, and thus to establish a model screening process for suicide prevention. Purposive sampling was used to invite inpatients and outpatients with lung cancer, leukemia, and lymphoma. Two hundred participants completed the questionnaire, which included the Distress Thermometer (DT), Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), Demoralization Scale-Mandarin Version (DS-MV), and Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation. All data obtained were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 and SAS 9.3. Tobit regression analysis showed that demoralization influenced suicidal ideation more than depression did (t = 2.84, p < 0.01). When PHQ-9 ≥ 10 and DS-MV ≥42 were used as criteria for the DT, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that the AUC values were 0.77–0.79, with optimal cutoff points for both of DT ≥5; sensitivity 76.9 and 80.6 %, respectively; and specificity of 73.9 and 72.2 %, respectively. Demoralization had more influence on suicidal ideation than depression did. Therefore, attention should be paid to highly demoralized patients with cancer or high demoralization comorbid with depression for the purposes of suicide evaluation and prevention. The DT scale (with a cutoff of ≥5 points) has discriminative ability as a screening tool for demoralization or depression and can also be used in clinical settings for the preliminary screening of patients with cancer and high suicide risk.

153 citations


Cited by
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01 Jan 2002

9,314 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 May 1981
TL;DR: This chapter discusses Detecting Influential Observations and Outliers, a method for assessing Collinearity, and its applications in medicine and science.
Abstract: 1. Introduction and Overview. 2. Detecting Influential Observations and Outliers. 3. Detecting and Assessing Collinearity. 4. Applications and Remedies. 5. Research Issues and Directions for Extensions. Bibliography. Author Index. Subject Index.

4,948 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Jean Bousquet, N. Khaltaev, Alvaro A. Cruz1, Judah A. Denburg2, W. J. Fokkens3, Alkis Togias4, T. Zuberbier5, Carlos E. Baena-Cagnani6, Giorgio Walter Canonica7, C. van Weel8, Ioana Agache9, Nadia Aït-Khaled, Claus Bachert10, Michael S. Blaiss11, Sergio Bonini12, L.-P. Boulet13, Philippe-Jean Bousquet, Paulo Augusto Moreira Camargos14, K-H. Carlsen15, Y. Z. Chen, Adnan Custovic16, Ronald Dahl17, Pascal Demoly, H. Douagui, Stephen R. Durham18, R. Gerth van Wijk19, O. Kalayci19, Michael A. Kaliner20, You Young Kim21, Marek L. Kowalski, Piotr Kuna22, L. T. T. Le23, Catherine Lemière24, Jing Li25, Richard F. Lockey26, S. Mavale-Manuel26, Eli O. Meltzer27, Y. Mohammad28, J Mullol, Robert M. Naclerio29, Robyn E O'Hehir30, K. Ohta31, S. Ouedraogo31, S. Palkonen, Nikolaos G. Papadopoulos32, Gianni Passalacqua7, Ruby Pawankar33, Todor A. Popov34, Klaus F. Rabe35, J Rosado-Pinto36, G. K. Scadding37, F. E. R. Simons38, Elina Toskala39, E. Valovirta40, P. Van Cauwenberge10, De Yun Wang41, Magnus Wickman42, Barbara P. Yawn43, Arzu Yorgancioglu44, Osman M. Yusuf, H. J. Zar45, Isabella Annesi-Maesano46, E.D. Bateman45, A. Ben Kheder47, Daniel A. Boakye48, J. Bouchard, Peter Burney18, William W. Busse49, Moira Chan-Yeung50, Niels H. Chavannes35, A.G. Chuchalin, William K. Dolen51, R. Emuzyte52, Lawrence Grouse53, Marc Humbert, C. M. Jackson54, Sebastian L. Johnston18, Paul K. Keith2, James P. Kemp27, J. M. Klossek55, Désirée Larenas-Linnemann55, Brian J. Lipworth54, Jean-Luc Malo24, Gailen D. Marshall56, Charles K. Naspitz57, K. Nekam, Bodo Niggemann58, Ewa Nizankowska-Mogilnicka59, Yoshitaka Okamoto60, M. P. Orru61, Paul Potter45, David Price62, Stuart W. Stoloff63, Olivier Vandenplas, Giovanni Viegi, Dennis M. Williams64 
Federal University of Bahia1, McMaster University2, University of Amsterdam3, National Institutes of Health4, Charité5, Catholic University of Cordoba6, University of Genoa7, Radboud University Nijmegen8, Transilvania University of Brașov9, Ghent University10, University of Tennessee Health Science Center11, University of Naples Federico II12, Laval University13, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais14, University of Oslo15, University of Manchester16, Aarhus University17, Imperial College London18, Erasmus University Rotterdam19, George Washington University20, Seoul National University21, Medical University of Łódź22, Hai phong University Of Medicine and Pharmacy23, Université de Montréal24, Guangzhou Medical University25, University of South Florida26, University of California, San Diego27, University of California28, University of Chicago29, Monash University30, Teikyo University31, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens32, Nippon Medical School33, Sofia Medical University34, Leiden University35, Leiden University Medical Center36, University College London37, University of Manitoba38, University of Helsinki39, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health40, National University of Singapore41, Karolinska Institutet42, University of Minnesota43, Celal Bayar University44, University of Cape Town45, Pierre-and-Marie-Curie University46, Tunis University47, University of Ghana48, University of Wisconsin-Madison49, University of British Columbia50, Georgia Regents University51, Vilnius University52, University of Washington53, University of Dundee54, University of Poitiers55, University of Mississippi56, Federal University of São Paulo57, German Red Cross58, Jagiellonian University Medical College59, Chiba University60, American Pharmacists Association61, University of Aberdeen62, University of Nevada, Reno63, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill64
01 Apr 2008-Allergy
TL;DR: The ARIA guidelines for the management of allergic rhinitis and asthma are similar in both the 1999 ARIA workshop report and the 2008 Update as discussed by the authors, but the GRADE approach is not yet available.
Abstract: Allergic rhinitis is a symptomatic disorder of the nose induced after allergen exposure by an IgE-mediated inflammation of the membranes lining the nose. It is a global health problem that causes major illness and disability worldwide. Over 600 million patients from all countries, all ethnic groups and of all ages suffer from allergic rhinitis. It affects social life, sleep, school and work and its economic impact is substantial. Risk factors for allergic rhinitis are well identified. Indoor and outdoor allergens as well as occupational agents cause rhinitis and other allergic diseases. The role of indoor and outdoor pollution is probably very important, but has yet to be fully understood both for the occurrence of the disease and its manifestations. In 1999, during the Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) WHO workshop, the expert panel proposed a new classification for allergic rhinitis which was subdivided into 'intermittent' or 'persistent' disease. This classification is now validated. The diagnosis of allergic rhinitis is often quite easy, but in some cases it may cause problems and many patients are still under-diagnosed, often because they do not perceive the symptoms of rhinitis as a disease impairing their social life, school and work. The management of allergic rhinitis is well established and the ARIA expert panel based its recommendations on evidence using an extensive review of the literature available up to December 1999. The statements of evidence for the development of these guidelines followed WHO rules and were based on those of Shekelle et al. A large number of papers have been published since 2000 and are extensively reviewed in the 2008 Update using the same evidence-based system. Recommendations for the management of allergic rhinitis are similar in both the ARIA workshop report and the 2008 Update. In the future, the GRADE approach will be used, but is not yet available. Another important aspect of the ARIA guidelines was to consider co-morbidities. Both allergic rhinitis and asthma are systemic inflammatory conditions and often co-exist in the same patients. In the 2008 Update, these links have been confirmed. The ARIA document is not intended to be a standard-of-care document for individual countries. It is provided as a basis for physicians, health care professionals and organizations involved in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma in various countries to facilitate the development of relevant local standard-of-care documents for patients.

3,769 citations

01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: This application applied longitudinal data analysis modeling change and event occurrence will help people to enjoy a good book with a cup of coffee in the afternoon instead of facing with some infectious virus inside their computer.
Abstract: Thank you very much for downloading applied longitudinal data analysis modeling change and event occurrence. As you may know, people have look hundreds times for their favorite novels like this applied longitudinal data analysis modeling change and event occurrence, but end up in malicious downloads. Rather than enjoying a good book with a cup of coffee in the afternoon, instead they are facing with some infectious virus inside their computer.

2,102 citations