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Kumiko Yamamoto

Bio: Kumiko Yamamoto is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Storytelling & Orality. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 15 citations.

Papers
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Book
01 Jun 2003
TL;DR: In this paper, a set of formal and thematic criteria is proposed to determine the extent to which written Persian epics show structures ultimately deriving from oral performance, and applied to the Shah-name of Ferdowsi (c. 1000) and to the Garshasp-name (Garshaspname) of Asadi (c., 1064-66).
Abstract: This volume discusses the indirect influence of oral transmission on the genesis and evolution of the Persian written epic tradition. On the basis of formal characteristics of naqqali (Persian storytelling) performance, a set of formal and thematic criteria is proposed to determine the extent to which written Persian epics show structures ultimately deriving from oral performance. It is applied to the Shah-name of Ferdowsi (c. 1000) and to the Garshasp-name of Asadi (c. 1064-66). The first part of the book examines the Oral-Formulaic Theory and proposes an alternative approach focusing on naqqali. The book may be relevant to both oralists and Iranists; it demonstrates the complex process where orality interacts with written tradition in the genesis of the Shah-name.

15 citations

Peer ReviewDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the authors compare the Book of Ḥamza with the Shāhnāma (Book of Kings), the two most popular works performed by the storytellers of Safavid Iran (1501-1736), focusing on their heroes.
Abstract: Abstract This paper compares the Ḥamzanāma (Book of Ḥamza) with the Shāhnāma (Book of Kings), the two most popular works performed by the storytellers of Safavid Iran (1501–1736), focusing on their heroes, Ḥamza and Rustam, respectively. Following an overview of the Ḥamzanāma that helps to identify its main intertexts, themes, and narrative elements: the Shāhnāma; the Islamic Alexander tradition; and ʿayyārī (trickery); the paper re-examines how Ḥamza is modelled after Rustam by looking at his epithets and narrative functions. It then turns to their differences, which are most discernible in Rustam's epithet used as the name of Ḥamza's enemy, the split between the ideals of jawānmardī (generosity) and ʿayyārī, and Ḥamza's unheroic weaknesses. This latter serves to emphasize God's compassion at his martyrdom while giving storytellers an impetus to continue their performances.

Cited by
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Book
30 Sep 2013
TL;DR: In this article, the prophet Mohammad's Persian companion, Salman al-Farisi, was described as a prophet who asserted the end of the past and reformed Iranians' memories of pre-Islamic times.
Abstract: 1. Prior connections to Islam 2. Muhammad's Persian companion, Salman al-Farisi 3. Finding meaning in the past 4. Reforming Iranians' memories of pre-Islamic times 5. The unhappy prophet 6. Asserting the end of the past.

57 citations

Book
Ron Sela1
29 Apr 2011
TL;DR: A remarkable and rigorous scholarly appraisal of the legendary biographies of Tamerlane is the first of its kind in any language as mentioned in this paper, which sheds light not only on the character and how he was remembered and championed by many generations after his demise, but also on the era in which the biographies were written and how they were conceived and received by the local populace during an age of crisis in their own history.
Abstract: Timur (or Tamerlane) is famous as the fourteenth-century conqueror of much of Central Eurasia and the founder of the Timurid dynasty. His reputation lived on in his native lands and reappeared some three centuries after his death in the form of fictional biographies, authored anonymously in Persian and Turkic. These biographies have become part of popular culture. Despite a direct continuity in their production from the eighteenth century to the present, they remain virtually unknown to people outside the region. This remarkable and rigorous scholarly appraisal of the legendary biographies of Tamerlane is the first of its kind in any language. The book sheds light not only on the character of Tamerlane and how he was remembered and championed by many generations after his demise, but also on the era in which the biographies were written and how they were conceived and received by the local populace during an age of crisis in their own history.

30 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The special issue of the journal of Iranian Studies as discussed by the authors takes its theme from Ferdowsi's Shahnameh seen as a work of world literature, a term (Weltliteratur) which has earlier exponents.
Abstract: This special issue of the journal of Iranian Studies takes its theme from Ferdowsi's Shahnameh 1 seen as a work of world literature—a term (Weltliteratur) which, though it has earlier exponents,2 h...

16 citations

Book ChapterDOI
15 Jan 2011
TL;DR: In the last two decades, the problem of the interdependence of oral and written traditions has received growing attention in the context of Shāh-nāma studies.
Abstract: The issue of orality and the interplay between the oral and the written have long been an ‘academic backwater’ in the study of medieval Persian literature.1 There were mainly two reasons for this: (1) the choice of subject-matter for scholarly research has all too often been guided by evaluative aesthetic criteria, restricting it to the study of acknowledged masterpieces and leaving out whole layers of medieval literary production which might offer themselves most opportunely to inquiry from the viewpoint of orality, such as, for example, folk prose literature; (2) there has been a reluctance to make use of theoretical tools and approaches developed on the basis of inquiry into similar issues in Western literatures. In the last two decades, however, the problem of the interdependence of oral and written traditions has received growing attention, first of all in the context of Shāh-nāma studies. The Shāh-nāma (The Book of Kings) of Abū al-Qāsim Firdausī (d. c. 1020) is a vast epic poem, whose current standard edition includes over 50,000 rhymed couplets (Khāliqī–Mut. laq 1988–2008). The epic spans Iranian history from the mythical Gayōmart, the First Man, to the fall of the historical Sasanian dynasty as a result of the Arab conquest in the seventh century, and is thus considered the national epos of Iran.2 The other focal point for studying orality in medieval Persian literature has become the Persian dāstān. Dāstāns are capacious fictional prose narratives with branching plots, which relate the heroic-romantic adventures of their eponymous heroes, often with a religious, Islamic emphasis. Their composition and transmission are connected with the institution of professional or semiprofessional storytellers, who at different historical periods were known as muh. addithūn, qis .s .a-kh ānān, and, more recently, since about the Safavid period (sixteenth century onwards), as naqqālān.3 Lacking a strict genre definition, dāstāns were variously referred to by their authors as ‘tale, story’ (dāstān, rivāyat, h. ikāyat or qis .s .a) or ‘book’ (kitāb). In research literature they are defined as folk stories (dāstān-hā–yi ‘āmmiyāna),4 as narodnye dastany( Borshevskiy 1963:10–11), popular romances (Hanaway 1970: 7, and 1971), or as heroic novels (romanhāi pahlavāni) (Salimov 1971: 14–15). The writing down of the dāstāns most probably began in the eleventh century; the tradition of their composition survived till the second half of the

8 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The description of the duel between Gordāfarid and Sohrāb in Ferdowsi's Sāh-nāma carries structural resemblances to the depiction of Penthesilea's fight with Achilles as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The description of the duel between Gordāfarid and Sohrāb in Ferdowsī’s Sāh-nāma carries structural resemblances to the depiction of Penthesilea’s fight with Achilles. In the course of combat, the ...

8 citations