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L Clughen

Bio: L Clughen is an academic researcher from Nottingham Trent University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Higher education & Professional writing. The author has an hindex of 5, co-authored 9 publications receiving 71 citations.

Papers
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31 May 2012
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the process international students go through from their first arrival to completion of the course, and discuss the balance of tutor intervention in terms of providing an appropriate interactive environment.
Abstract: text book, relatively long assignments and the continuing challenge of what is meant by ‘critical evaluation’. What is helpful are the discussions which outline the process international students go through from their first arrival to completion of the course. Either directly or indirectly, evaluations evidence early stress levels, in contrast to those who are successful, exit with higher levels of confidence. Certainly the pedagogic approaches discussed allow the reader to realise much more is needed regarding engagement of student learning in addition to guidance. The balance of tutor intervention is critical in terms of providing an appropriate interactive environment. Student experiences are presented that show a good understanding is needed of an international student need to develop, both on a personal and academic level, and what can happen when the policy, design, or tutor activity are not appropriate or fit for purpose.

24 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the prospects for an adaption through the piloting of an embedded approach in the Social Theory subject area, but the project ran into a series of resistances that came close to thwarting it en...
Abstract: Support for writing instruction amongst lecturers in UK Universities is high, but they often prefer it to be provided by dedicated study skills specialists operating outside subject curricula. Yet because of the well-documented problems with the skills approach (where literacy support frequently becomes a generic add-on), American models such as Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) and Writing in the Disciplines (WID) make a strong claim that writing stratagems and thinking/theorizing within disciplines are actually intrinsically linked. It is accordingly now a commonplace in such literacy research that writing development needs to be contextualized within the disciplines, and interest in adapting such approaches to the UK context is burgeoning. A recent project at Nottingham Trent University set out to explore the prospects for such an adaption through the piloting of an embedded approach in the Social Theory subject area, but the project ran into a series of resistances that came close to thwarting it en...

18 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, two academics from Art and Design and Humanities in a UK university used different techniques to create participatory writing cultures in the classroom and found that despite different settings, similar issues arose that are not fully addressed in the literature on writing development, including student non-engagement with active learning; issues with the development of critical skills; and student agency.
Abstract: One particularly difficult area for higher education students is writing appropriately for their respective disciplines. As writing is a social, cultural and dialogic act, writing support should create learning events that will allow for useful social exchange of ideas within the appropriate disciplinary cultures. Indeed, many claims are made in favour of disciplinary-based writing support: students will become more engaged with their subjects, will develop as critical thinkers and, through debate, will produce scripts which are more likely to warrant them voice within their disciplinary cultures. In the study described in this paper, two academics from Art and Design and Humanities in a UK university used different techniques to create participatory writing cultures in the classroom. Despite different settings, similar issues arose that are not fully addressed in the literature on writing development, including student non-engagement with active learning; issues with the development of critical skills; and student agency. The authors will discuss their findings by drawing on student feedback and their own reflection on the teaching sessions.

6 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Higher education in the United Kingdom has rather lagged behind other countries in developing an interest in, scholarly research on, and realisation about the importance of student engagement as mentioned in this paper. This...
Abstract: Higher Education in the United Kingdom has rather lagged behind other countries in developing an interest in, scholarly research on, and realisation about the importance of student engagement. This...

511 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that to be successful research writers, students need to become discourse analysts; develop authorial voice and identity; and acquire critical competence, and present a detailed case study of one Masters' student to illustrate the results of a pedagogy that moved beyond notions of deficit and support.
Abstract: Graduate writing is receiving increasing attention, particularly in contexts of diverse student bodies and widening access to universities. In many of these contexts, writing is seen as ‘a problem’ in need of fixing. Often, the problem and the solution are perceived as being solely located in notions of deficit in individuals and not in the broader embedded and sometimes invisible discourse practices. An academic literacies approach shifts the focus from the individual to broader social practices. This research project emerged out of an attempt to develop a graduate research-writing pedagogy from an academic literacies perspective. We present a detailed case study of one Masters' student to illustrate the results of a pedagogy that moved beyond notions of deficit and support. We argue that to be successful research writers, students need to (1) become discourse analysts; (2) develop authorial voice and identity; and (3) acquire critical competence.

59 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article explored students' experience of such informal learning spaces, through focus groups and walk-with-interviews, and found that the creation of different types of learning atmosphere, should be understood as a multi-sensory experience, and actively constructed by learners themselves.
Abstract: Changes in pedagogy to emphasise independent study and group work have increased the need for informal learning spaces on campuses. University libraries have been quick to respond to this need, partly because of the decline in book lending and partly because of technology enablers. Furthermore, new types of buildings that combine many types of facility, including libraries and informal learning spaces, are being built. This research aimed to explore students’ experience of such informal learning spaces, through focus groups and walk with interviews. It was found that the creation of different types of learning atmosphere, should be understood as a multi-sensory experience, and actively constructed by learners themselves. Informal learning spaces are important destinations for students, who have favourite places to study, where they often work alongside companions and find motivation to work in the presence of others.

45 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors investigated how students develop their academic writing across language codes and registers in the multilingual contexts of a Swedish university and found that students' linguistic ideologies and their experiences can enable or restrict their capacity to draw on their varied repertoires.

35 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Communication is often not adequately developed by Australian universities, remaining implicit in teaching and assessment as discussed by the authors, in part because Australian universities have historically conceptualised communication not as an outcome of disciplinary study, but as a generic, foundational competency or skill, and have therefore managed outside the curriculum by establishing academic language and learning units that help students develop written and spoken communication through a range of student services.
Abstract: Communication is widely recognised as an important capability for university graduates [Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. (2013). OECD skills outlook 2013: First results from the survey of adult skills. Author. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264204256-en]. Yet, research suggests that it is often not adequately developed by Australian universities, remaining implicit in teaching and assessment. This is in part because Australian universities have historically conceptualised communication not as an outcome of disciplinary study, but as a generic, foundational competency or skill. It has therefore been managed outside the curriculum by establishing academic language and learning units that help students develop written and spoken communication through a range of student services. The services model of communication development is becoming untenable, however, given the increasing cultural and linguistic diversity of students and the recognised importance of communic...

23 citations