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L. G. Moses

Bio: L. G. Moses is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Biography & Native American studies. The author has an hindex of 6, co-authored 7 publications receiving 170 citations.

Papers
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Book
01 Apr 1996
TL;DR: In this article, the first years of Cody's Wild West show are described, and the Wild West shows in its prime, 1900-1917, United States government policies and alternate images are discussed.
Abstract: Before the Wild West show -- The first years of Cody's Wild West -- The Wild West of London -- Reformers and the image of the show Indian -- Indians abroad, 1889-1890 -- Ghost dancers of London, 1891-1892 -- Indians on the midway : fairs and expositions,1893-1903 -- Show-Indian students in St. Louis, 1904 -- The Wild West show in its prime, 1900-1917 -- Federal policies and alternate images, 1900-1917 -- Filming the Wild West, 1896-1913 -- Decline of the Wild West shows, 1917-1933.

63 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Indian Man examines the life of James Mooney (1861-1921), the son of poor Irish immigrants who became a champion of Native peoples and one of the most influential anthropology fieldworkers of all time as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The Indian Man examines the life of James Mooney (1861-1921), the son of poor Irish immigrants who became a champion of Native peoples and one of the most influential anthropology fieldworkers of all time. As a staff member of the Smithsonian Institution for over three decades, Mooney conducted fieldwork and gathered invaluable information on rapidly changing Native American cultures across the continent. His fieldwork among the Eastern Cherokees, Cheyennes, and Kiowas provides priceless snapshots of their traditional ways of life, and his sophisticated and sympathetic analysis of the 1890 Ghost Dance and the consequent tragedy at Wounded Knee has not been surpassed a century later. L. G. Moses is a professor of history at Oklahoma State University. He is the author of Wild West Shows and the Images of American Indians, 1833-1933.

43 citations

Book
01 Jan 1984
TL;DR: The Indian Man examines the life of James Mooney (1861-1921), the son of poor Irish immigrants who became a champion of Native peoples and one of the most influential anthropology fieldworkers of all time as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: The Indian Man examines the life of James Mooney (1861-1921), the son of poor Irish immigrants who became a champion of Native peoples and one of the most influential anthropology fieldworkers of all time. As a staff member of the Smithsonian Institution for over three decades, Mooney conducted fieldwork and gathered invaluable information on rapidly changing Native American cultures across the continent. His fieldwork among the Eastern Cherokees, Cheyennes, and Kiowas provides priceless snapshots of their traditional ways of life, and his sophisticated and sympathetic analysis of the 1890 Ghost Dance and the consequent tragedy at Wounded Knee has not been surpassed a century later. L. G. Moses is a professor of history at Oklahoma State University. He is the author of Wild West Shows and the Images of American Indians, 1833-1933.

34 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Collaborative ethnography as discussed by the authors is a powerful way to engage the public with anthropology, and it can be seen as a way to serve humankind more directly and more immediately.
Abstract: Collaborative ethnographythe collaboration of researchers and subjects in the production of ethnographic textsoffers us a powerful way to engage the public with anthropology. As one of many academic/applied approaches, contemporary collaborative ethnography stems from a wellestablished historical tradition of collaboratively produced texts that are often overlooked. Feminist and postmodernist efforts to recenter ethnography along dialogical lines further contextualize this historically situated collaborative practice. The goals of collaborative ethnography (both historical and contemporary) are now powerfully converging with those of a public anthropology that pulls together academic and applied anthropology in an effort to serve humankind more directly and more immediately.

319 citations

BookDOI
01 Jan 2002
TL;DR: In this paper, Deloria et al. presented a survey of the history of American Indians in the United States, Canada, and Mexico, focusing on the first contact, kinship, family kindreds, and community.
Abstract: List of Contributors.Introduction.1 Historiography.Philip J. Deloria (University of Colorado).2 First Contacts.John Kicza (Washington State University).3 Health, Disease, Demography.Russell Thornton (University of California, Los Angeles).4 Wag the Imperial Dog: Indians and Overseas Empires in North America, 1650-1776.Gregory E. Dowd (University of Notre Dame).5 Native Americans and the United States, Canada, and Mexico.R. David Edmunds (Indiana University).6 Languages: Linguistic Change and the Study of Indian Languages from Colonial Times to the Present.Regna Darnell (University of Western Ontario).7 Native American Systems of Knowledge.Clara Sue Kidwell (University of Oklahoma).8 Native American Spirituality: History, Theory, and Reformulation.Lee Irwin (College of Charleston).9 Indians and Christianity.Willard Rollins (University of Nevada, Las Vegas).10 Kinship, Family Kindreds, and Community.Jay Miller (Simon Fraser University).11 The Nature of Conquest: Indians, Americans, and Environmental History.Louis Warren (University of California, Davis).12 Labor and Exchange in American Indian History.Patricia Albers (University of Minnesota).13 American Indian Warfare: The Cycles of Conflict and the Militarization of Native North America.Tom Holm (University of Arizona).14 Indian Law, Sovereignty, and State Law: Native People and the Law.Sidney L. Harring (City University of New York Law School).15 Federal and State Policies and American Indians.Donald Fixico (Western Michigan University).16 Gender in Native America.Betty Bell (University of Michigan).17 Metis, Mestizo, and Mixed-Blood.Jennifer Brown (University of Winnipeg) and Theresa Schenck (Washington State University).18 Transforming Outsiders: Captivity, Adoption, and Slavery Considered.Pauline Turner Strong (University of Texas at Austin).19 Translation and Cultural Brokerage.Eric Hinderaker (University of Utah).20 Native American Literatures.P. Jane Hafen (University of Nevada, Las Vegas).21 Indigenous Art: Creating Value and Sharing Beauty.Nancy Parezo (University of Arizona).22 Performative Traditions in American Indian History.George Moses (Oklahoma State University).23 American Indian Education: by Indians vs. for Indians.K. Tsianina Lomawaima (University of Arizona).24 Wanted: More Histories of Indian Identity.Alexandra Harmon (University of Washington).25 Sovereignty.Gerald Taiaike Alfred (University of Victoria).Bibliography.Index

265 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In more than a hundred years of Anglo-American ethnography, observation has been combined with a wide variety of theoretical outlooks from structured-functionalist to critical writings.
Abstract: Ethnography is never mere description, rather it is a theory of describing that has always been controversial as to the what and how thus inspiring a dynamic intellectual process. The process has been methodologically eclectic and innovative, governed by both consensual and outdated rules. Throughout more than hundred years of Anglo-American ethnography, observation has been combined with a wide variety of theoretical outlooks from structured-functionalist to critical writings.

114 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors suggest that significant differences exist between American Indian and western approaches to, and perspectives on, leadership, and illustrate some of these differences drawing particularly upon Indian educational leadership, pointing out that American Indian leadership was often interpreted by non-indigenous observers as an inability to lead rather than a different ability to lead.
Abstract: Having drawn some brief historical lines for our research, we suggest that significant differences exist between American Indian and western approaches to, and perspectives on, leadership, and we illustrate some of these differences drawing particularly upon Indian educational leadership. American Indian leadership was often interpreted by non-indigenous observers as an inability to lead rather than a different ability to lead. Western models are often rooted in positional approaches, despite their assertions to the contrary, whereas Indian models are more concerned with persuasive techniques, and while western approaches are almost always individual in form, American Indian models are more concerned with how different forms of leadership in different circumstances can serve the community rather than enhance the reward and reputation of their individual embodiment. We illustrate this with a model of American Indian leadership that exposes the differences by concentrating upon the methods through which per...

75 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The American Indian Religious Freedom Act (AIRFA) as mentioned in this paper was passed by Congress as a guarantee of constitutional protection of First Amendment rights for Native Americans, including access to sacred sites, use and possession of sacred objects and freedom to worship through ceremonials and traditional rites.
Abstract: In August 1978, the American Indian Religious Freedom Act (AIRFA) was passed by Congress as a guarantee of constitutional protection of First Amendment rights for Native Americans. This act was passed as an attempt to redress past wrongs by the federal government or its agents. That history of legal suppression was due to "the lack of a clear, comprehensive and consistent Federal policy [which] has often resulted in the abridgement ofreligious freedom for traditional American Indians." The summary text of this act' states: Henceforth it shall be the policy of the United States to protect and preserve for American Indians their inherent right of freedom to believe, express, and exercise the traditional religions of the American Indian, Eskimo, Aleut, and Native Hawaiians, including but not limited to access to sacred sites, use and possession of sacred objects and freedom to worship through ceremonials and traditional rites. It is perhaps hard for those unfamiliar with the history of Native American religious oppression to realize that in our own lifetimes it continues to be difficult or impossible for Native Americans to freely practice their religions. The suppression of those practices has been pervasive to such a degree that AIRFA has proven to be insufficient to grant the freedom that many Native Americans feel is necessary for the complete affirmation of their respective religious identities. What is the background that necessitated AIRFA and what directions have issues of religious affirmation taken since this act became law? Perhaps the most suppressive laws regarding religious freedom were those promulgated by the Bureau of Indian Affairs for the Indian Courts, known as the Indian Religious Crimes Code. These laws were first developed in 1883 by Secretary of the Interior Henry Teller as a means to prohibit Native American ceremonial activity under pain of imprisonment. Teller's general guidelines to all Indian agents ordered them to discontinue dances and feasts as well as instructing them to take steps with regard to all medicine. men, "who are always found in the anti-progressive party . . to compel these impostors to abandon this deception and discontinue their practices, which are not only without benefit to them but positively injurious to them."2 Religious offenses on the reservations were later codified by the CommisLee Irwin is an Associate Professor of Religious Studies at the College of Charleston in South Carolina.

66 citations