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L.G. Whitehead

Bio: L.G. Whitehead is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Boundary layer & Laminar flow. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 2 citations.

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TL;DR: In this paper, a new approximate solution of the boundary layer equations devised to meet difficulties that are encountered in applying earlier solutions to laminar flow aerofoils and similarly thin cylinders is presented.
Abstract: ANOTHER paper (Ref. 1) establishes a new approximate solution of the boundary layer equations devised to meet difficulties that are encountered in applying earlier solutions to laminar flow aerofoils and similarly thin cylinders. The advantage is in respect sometimes of accuracy, sometimes of applicability. The solution is a little unwieldy in its general form, however, and the present paper describes simplifications to facilitate rapid technical use. They are of two kinds, one being much more drastic than the other, and that first given, or both, may be used according to the nature of the problem and the accuracy required. Examples suggest that the resulting loss of accuracy and applicability will be small in most instances. This matter is described in Section I.

2 citations


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TL;DR: The centenary of Queen Mary College's involvement in aeronautics is celebrated in this article, with the focus on the early years from 1907 until the 1950s, a period ripe for recording before it recedes beyond living memory, but also the period during which the degree course of aeronautical engineering became firmly established and its parent Department acquired its reputation for research.
Abstract: This paper celebrates the centenary of Queen Mary College’s involvement in aeronautics, a celebration with a unique distinction since it was this College’s immediate forebear which was the first British higher education institution to begin teaching and research in this subject. Thus the emphasis is on the early years from 1907 until the 1950s, a period ripe for recording before it recedes beyond living memory, but also the period during which the degree course in aeronautical engineering became firmly established and its parent Department acquired its reputation for research. Section 2.0 gives a brief history of the College’s origins in the East London College. Subsequent sections deal with the foundation of the aeronautical laboratory there, from which the aeronautical department grew, and the activities of the two men who led these developments, A.P. Thurston and N.A.V. Tonnstein who changed his name to Piercy.

9 citations