scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

L G. Whitehead

Bio: L G. Whitehead is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Boundary layer & Boundary layer thickness. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 13 citations.

Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the problem was reduced to that of the construction and solution of two equations governing the variation of these parameters around the surface of the cylinder considered, and the second condition was selected.
Abstract: AN approximate solution of the boundary layer equations recently completed involved the assumption of a velocity profile through the boundary layerdepending on two parameters. As a result the problem was reduced to that of the construction and solution of two equations governing the variation of these parameters around the surface of the cylinder considered. Earlier solutions, such as Pohlhauscn's, have made use of a single parameter only and have employed Karman's momentum integral for its determination, but the additional, parameter now introduced necessitates the use of a further equation. It is the purpose of the present note to discuss and illustrate the properties of the second condition that was selected.

13 citations


Cited by
More filters
01 Jan 1955
TL;DR: A survey of integral methods in laminar-boundary-layer analysis is given in this paper, where a simple and sufficiently accurate method for practical purposes of calculating the properties (including stability) of the LBP in an axial pressure gradient with heat transfer at the wall is presented.
Abstract: A survey of integral methods in laminar-boundary-layer analysis is first given. A simple and sufficiently accurate method for practical purposes of calculating the properties (including stability) of the laminar compressible boundary layer in an axial pressure gradient with heat transfer at the wall is presented. For flow over a flat plate, the method is applicable for an arbitrarily prescribed distribution of temperature along the surface and for any given constant Prandtl number close to unity. For flow in a pressure gradient, the method is based on a Prandtl number of unity and a uniform wall temperature. A simple and accurate method of determining the separation point in a compressible flow with an adverse pressure gradient over a surface at a given uniform wall temperature is developed. The analysis is based on an extension of the Karman-Pohlhausen method to the momentum and the thermal energy equations in conjunction with fourth- and especially higher degree velocity and stagnation-enthalpy profiles.

14 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a simple procedure is developed for approximate calculations of wall heat-transfer rates in transpired boundary layers, and applications of this procedure are illustrated by various examples of incompressible, laminar flows in the limits of large and small Prandtl numbers.

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The centenary of Queen Mary College's involvement in aeronautics is celebrated in this article, with the focus on the early years from 1907 until the 1950s, a period ripe for recording before it recedes beyond living memory, but also the period during which the degree course of aeronautical engineering became firmly established and its parent Department acquired its reputation for research.
Abstract: This paper celebrates the centenary of Queen Mary College’s involvement in aeronautics, a celebration with a unique distinction since it was this College’s immediate forebear which was the first British higher education institution to begin teaching and research in this subject. Thus the emphasis is on the early years from 1907 until the 1950s, a period ripe for recording before it recedes beyond living memory, but also the period during which the degree course in aeronautical engineering became firmly established and its parent Department acquired its reputation for research. Section 2.0 gives a brief history of the College’s origins in the East London College. Subsequent sections deal with the foundation of the aeronautical laboratory there, from which the aeronautical department grew, and the activities of the two men who led these developments, A.P. Thurston and N.A.V. Tonnstein who changed his name to Piercy.

9 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors applied the integral method to determine the downstream influence of homogeneous mass transfer in the stagnation region of a blunt, axisymmetric body under hypersonic flight conditions.

8 citations

01 Mar 1952
TL;DR: In this paper, a number of the most promising integral methods for solving approximately the compressible laminar boundary layer equations are investigated in order to determine a computationally convenient and sufficiently accurate method of calculating boundary layer characteristics.
Abstract: : A number of the most promising integral methods for solving approximately the compressible laminar boundary layer equations are investigated in order to determine a computationally convenient and sufficiently accurate method of calculating boundary layer characteristics. The chief methods considered are: (a) The one-parameter Karm'a'n-Pohlhausen method, with three different assumptions for the velocity profiles, and (b) the two-parameter method, first applied by Sutton, with two different assumptions for the velocity profiles. After the methods are explicitly described in general terms for the case of zero pressure gradient and for the case of a pressure gradient in the direction of flow with zero heat transfer, they are applied to the calculation of the compressible laminar boundary layer over a surface with zero pressure gradient, with and without heat transfer at the surface, for the purpose of establishing the accuracy of the methods. Comparison of the results is made with those of known exact solutions for skin-friction and he at -transfer coefficients, velocity profiles, velocity derivatives, and especially laminar-boundary- layer stability. From this comparison it is found that the %rman'- Pohlhausen method with a sixth-degree polynomial as the velocity profile is the most suitable for many practical purposes.

5 citations