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L Humphrey

Bio: L Humphrey is an academic researcher from Newcastle University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Community engagement & Higher education. The author has an hindex of 6, co-authored 16 publications receiving 143 citations. Previous affiliations of L Humphrey include Philippine Institute for Development Studies.

Papers
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01 Jan 2009
TL;DR: In this paper, a literature review seeks to understand university engagement, and place it in a context from which useful lessons for becoming egaged can be drawn, using a very wide definition of the term "engagement" in this report, to refer to all the relationships and connections which universities have with the wider society, including businesses, government, the voluntary and community sector and other societal actors.
Abstract: This literature review seeks to understand university engagement, and place it in a context from which useful lessons for becoming egaged can be drawn. We use a very wide definition of the term 'engagement' in this report, to refer to all the relationships and connections which universities have with the wider society, including businesses, government, the voluntary and community sector and other societal actors.

35 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
L Humphrey1
TL;DR: The authors evaluate the rationale of empiricist-analytical and narrative-linguistic theories of historying through its practice, and conclude that historying can be viewed as a form of narrative linguistics.
Abstract: This article aims to contribute to debates on ‘what is history’ by evaluating the rationale of ‘empiricist-analytical’ and ‘narrative-linguistic’ theories of historying through its practice...

26 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors assess the relationship between devolved government and democratic renewal through a focus on the potential for stakeholder involvement within elected regional assemblies and conclude that existing arrangements and practices are a useful development but fall far short of the radical measures needed to overcome the exclusionary nature of traditional models of governance and government.
Abstract: In this paper we aim to assess critically the relationship between devolved government and democratic renewal through a focus on the potential for stakeholder involvement within elected regional assemblies. Drawing particularly upon evidence from North East England, we will consider how the creation of elected assemblies could reinvigorate democracy, given the constraints imposed (in regions such as the North East) by the unreformed and unrepresentative political terrain upon which any new assembly is likely to be superimposed. We conclude that existing arrangements and practices are a useful development but fall far short of the radical measures needed to overcome the exclusionary nature of traditional models of governance and government.

23 citations

Book ChapterDOI
L Humphrey1
01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: A survey of university-community engagement policy and practice across Scotland's universities revealed a diversity of corporate approach and strategy alongside individual academic and managerial commitment and leadership, but also revealed persistent pressures and tensions (external and internal) that continued to restrict institutional engagement practices and understanding as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: How exactly are universities responding to and understanding the demand to engage with communities? A survey of university–community engagement policy and practice across Scotland’s universities revealed a diversity of corporate approach and strategy alongside individual academic and managerial commitment and leadership. But it also revealed persistent pressures and tensions (external and internal) that continued to restrict institutional engagement practices and understanding. Many of those interviewed argued that, given time, universities would become more conversant with both its concept and practice, and that, as a consequence, community engagement would become more integrated into future culture and structure. However, this optimism did not take into consideration some rather fundamental external and internal constraints that inhibit major change in comprehension or incorporation. The paper reports a ‘best practice’ example of a community engagement project that won widespread external recognition, and yet was hived out of the university in response to a lack of institutional commitment. The paper neatly illustrates the dislocation between the rhetoric and practice of community engagement across Scotland’s Higher Education (HE) sector. On a more theoretical level the project provides a critique of dominant learning practice and value. University–community engagement per se reveals fundamental barriers endemic in traditional learning cultures and structures. Whilst recognised by committed academics (and some managers), university cultures fail to accommodate, promote or reward university–community engagement or challenge entrenched scepticism of its scholarly worth.

19 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: This article explored the dynamics of these institutional dialogues as a means of understanding university-community engagement and found that institutional narratives of community engagement can be found that encompass many different groupings' attitudes, and hence reinforce its peripherality, contingency and optionality.
Abstract: This chapter seeks to highlight and make explicit some of the tensions and issues that arise inside universities seeking to engage, and to provide insights into how activities framed as peripheral, contingent and voluntary can become significant to a particular institution. This chapter begins from the perspective that a university can be regarded as a set of groupings with different, and sometimes competing, interests. For community engagement to become a serious institutional interest, engagement must offer something to each grouping within the university. This chapter explores the dynamics of these institutional dialogues as a means of understanding university–community engagement. Different groupings have different kinds of attachments to community engagement as a means of fulfilling their own interests. Where institutional narratives of community engagement can be found that encompass many different groupings’ attitudes, then community engagement can become important to the university. Otherwise, internal tensions frame community engagement as working against institutional interests, and hence reinforce its peripherality, contingency and optionality.

14 citations


Cited by
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Posted Content
TL;DR: The process of innovation must be viewed as a series of changes in a complete system not only of hardware, but also of market environment, production facilities and knowledge, and the social contexts of the innovation organization as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Models that depict innovation as a smooth, well-behaved linear process badly misspecify the nature and direction of the causal factors at work. Innovation is complex, uncertain, somewhat disorderly, and subject to changes of many sorts. Innovation is also difficult to measure and demands close coordination of adequate technical knowledge and excellent market judgment in order to satisfy economic, technological, and other types of constraints—all simultaneously. The process of innovation must be viewed as a series of changes in a complete system not only of hardware, but also of market environment, production facilities and knowledge, and the social contexts of the innovation organization.

2,154 citations

Book
31 Oct 2006
TL;DR: This book addresses the fundamental issues of what kind of local and regional development and for whom and frameworks of understanding, and instruments and policies should be pursued.
Abstract: Actors and institutions in localities and regions across the world are seeking prosperity and well-being amidst tumultuous and disruptive shifts and transitions generated by: an increasingly globalised, knowledge-intensive capitalism; global financial instability, volatility and crisis; concerns about economic, social and ecological sustainability, climate change and resource shortages; new multi-actor and multi-level systems of government and governance and a re-ordering of the international political economy; state austerity and retrenchment; and, new and reformed approaches to intervention, policy and institutions for local and regional development. Local and Regional Development provides an accessible, critical and integrated examination of local and regional development theory, institutions and policy in this changing context. Amidst its rising importance, the book addresses the fundamental issues of ‘what kind of local and regional development and for whom?’, its purposes, principles and values, frameworks of understanding, approaches and interventions, and integrated approaches to local and regional development throughout the world. The approach provides a theoretically informed, critical analysis of contemporary local and regional development in an international and multi-disciplinary context, grounded in concrete empirical analysis from experiences in the global North and South. It concludes by identifying what might constitute holistic, inclusive, progressive and sustainable local and regional development, and reflecting upon its limits and political renewal.

586 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the light of contemporary ideas about causation, determinism, accident, objectivity, and the function and role, if any, of the individual person in history, ideas thin out.
Abstract: Among the many things which distinguish man from the lower animals and perhaps in a more spectacular but less extensive way distinguish man at an advanced level of culture from primitive man is the capacity to use the recorded experience of the past. This can help determine his actions in the present and thus determine in part what kind of future the world will see. The codification of knowledge of the past and its interpretation constitute the material of history. Doctrines and beliefs, various schools, and ideological sets about history determine each period's interpretation of what has gone on in the past. For instance, how may one reconcile the doctrinal myth of progress with the fix that the world is in now? In the light of contemporary ideas about causation, determinism, accident, objectivity, and the function and role, if any, of the individual person in history, ideas thin out. Professor

535 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A relational view of the region based upon an assemblage of political actors, some public, some private, where elements of central and local government are "lodged" within the region, not acting above or below it, is presented in this article.
Abstract: Allen J. and Cochrane A. (2007) Beyond the territorial fix: regional assemblages, politics and power, Regional Studies 41, 1161–1175. The idea of regions as territorially fixed in some vital political sense is a stubborn conception, one that is both mobilized to pursue selective interests and to establish regional identities. To assert that regions are political constructs, however, is not to say that such bounded, territorial entities enclose all the political relations that produce them. This paper puts forward a relational view of the region based upon an assemblage of political actors, some public, some private, where elements of central and local government are ‘lodged’ within the region, not acting above or below it. Using examples drawn from governing agencies across and beyond the south-east of England, it is shown how a more diffuse form of governance has given rise to a spatially discontinuous region. This is grounded in an exposition of the political assemblage that is Milton Keynes today, with...

503 citations