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L P Greenfield

Bio: L P Greenfield is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Brake shoe & Stress (mechanics). The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 2 citations.

Papers
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01 Apr 1975
TL;DR: In this paper, an analytical stress analysis of B-28 and CB-28 wheels of various designs is presented, where simulated service inputs of vertical, lateral, and brake shoe forces producing thermal loads from emergency braking are used.
Abstract: An analytical stress analysis of B-28 and CB-28 wheels of various designs is presented. Simulated service inputs of vertical, lateral, and brake shoe forces producing thermal loads from emergency braking are used. Octahedral stress mapping is used to display the stress fields generated in the wheels under combination of the above loading conditions. The results show that both wheels have low octahedral stresses when only vertical or vertical and lateral loads are applied, but under combined loading conditions including tread braking the stress levels in the B-28 contour exceed those in the CB-28 wheels.

2 citations


Cited by
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Patent
20 May 1977
TL;DR: In this paper, a railroad car wheel with an annular hub for connection to an axle and defining an inner radial surface adapted for disposition in facing relating to the inner surface of a wheel on the opposite end of the axle and an outboard radial surface facing outwardly of the wheel is described.
Abstract: A railroad car wheel having an annular hub for connection to an axle and defining an inner radial surface adapted for disposition in facing relating to the inner surface of a wheel on the opposite end of the axle and an outboard radial surface facing outwardly of the wheel, an annular tread defining rim portion disposed generally concentrically of the hub and defining an inner radial surface adapted for disposition in facing relation to the inner surface of a wheel on the opposite end of the axle and an outboard radial surface facing outwardly of the wheel, the rim portion being displaced axially outwardly with respect to the hub and including an outer, generally cylindrical rail engaging surface provided with radially extending flange adjacent the inner radial surface, and an integral annular plate portion connecting the rim and hub, the plate having a relatively thin cross section and being generally frusto-conical defining inboard and outboard conical surfaces, the plate joining the hub adjacent the inner radial surface with the inboard conical surface of the plate merging into the inner radial surface of the hub, the plate joining the rim with at least one of the inboard and outboard conical surfaces merging respectively with one of the inner radial outboard radial surfaces of the rim.

11 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: The American Public Transit Association (APTA) is seeking to develop specifications to ensure that wheels used in passenger applications perform safely under the service conditions to which they are exposed as discussed by the authors, and an approach has been developed which will address this need at two levels.
Abstract: The American Public Transit Association (APTA) is seeking to develop specifications to ensure that wheels used in passenger applications perform safely under the service conditions to which they are exposed. To this end, an approach has been developed which will address this need at two levels. First, a variant on the Association of American Railroads (AAR) S-660 standard [1] is proposed with loading requirements that more realistically represent typical conditions in passenger operations. This is considered a design standard and is to be applied to identify wheel designs not susceptible to fatigue cracking in the wheel plate and hub suitable for use by transit and commuter agencies. Second, an application standard (or more precisely, a recommended practice) has been conceived which is designed to assist transit agencies (or original equipment manufacturers) in the appropriate choice of an “approved” wheel design based on the expected service environment. This technique will identify wheel designs which, under normal operating conditions, should not result in thermal damage to the wheel tread.

1 citations