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L. Shelley Rawlins

Bio: L. Shelley Rawlins is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Economic Justice & Law. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 1 citations.

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TL;DR: In this article, a door-to-door social welfare advocate for the Maine People9s Alliance explores her experiences of being a stranger in the midst of facing other strangers in their homes.
Abstract: In this fusion of autoethnography and phenomenological description, I explicate my experiences as a door-to-door social welfare advocate for the Maine People9s Alliance. Examining my lived experiences of being a stranger in the midst of facing other strangers in their homes, I reflect on the collaborative constitution of strangerdom. I also recount the possibilities of transcendence through dialogic negotiations and attempts at dismantling this threshold of unfamiliarity. I argue that autoethnographic inquiries that include portrayals of unknown others are productively informed by the descriptive richness of phenomenological variations.

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors synthesize Aristotle's and Kenneth Burke's interrelated conceptions of tragedy to analyze these opposing activities in St. Louis by property and gun rights advocates versus the Expect Us political protestors as a tragedy.
Abstract: On June 28, 2020, St. Louis “Expect Us” racial justice protesters marching to their mayor’s front door encountered Mark and Patricia McCloskey aiming guns at them as they walked past the couple’s mansion on a private road. A clash of “rights” erupted in this situation when viewed through the opposing participants’ lenses. On one hand, two persons pulled guns on unarmed protesters that they viewed as encroaching dangerously on their private property. On the other hand, peaceful protesters pursuing their collective cause were forced to detour onto a private street and were met by two persons brandishing guns. This essay examines this troubling encounter in St. Louis when two parties convinced of their starkly different rights protected by law collide. I synthesize Aristotle’s and Kenneth Burke’s interrelated conceptions of tragedy to analyze these opposing activities in St. Louis by property and gun rights advocates versus the Expect Us political protestors as a tragedy. First, I discuss six historical events in St. Louis from 1906 to 2021 that contextualize this confrontation. Next, I explore the essence of the rights protected by the First and Second Amendments to the Constitution and how they pertain to this encounter. I then define and apply five overlapping features of Aristotle’s and Kenneth Burke’s accounts of tragedy to consider the implications of this highly publicized event as a microcosm of our presently polarized American society.

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27 Aug 2021-Compare
TL;DR: The authors conceptualized one possible antidote to the conditions that produce public mass gun violence (PMGV) in the United States, illuminating how PMGV is a backlash to the nation's "culture of tolerance".
Abstract: This paper conceptualises one possible antidote to the conditions that produce public mass gun violence (PMGV) in the United States. I begin by illuminating how PMGV is a backlash to the nation’s ‘...
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors synthesize Aristotle's and Kenneth Burke's interrelated conceptions of tragedy to analyze these opposing activities in St. Louis by property and gun rights advocates versus the Expect Us political protestors as a tragedy.
Abstract: On June 28, 2020, St. Louis “Expect Us” racial justice protesters marching to their mayor’s front door encountered Mark and Patricia McCloskey aiming guns at them as they walked past the couple’s mansion on a private road. A clash of “rights” erupted in this situation when viewed through the opposing participants’ lenses. On one hand, two persons pulled guns on unarmed protesters that they viewed as encroaching dangerously on their private property. On the other hand, peaceful protesters pursuing their collective cause were forced to detour onto a private street and were met by two persons brandishing guns. This essay examines this troubling encounter in St. Louis when two parties convinced of their starkly different rights protected by law collide. I synthesize Aristotle’s and Kenneth Burke’s interrelated conceptions of tragedy to analyze these opposing activities in St. Louis by property and gun rights advocates versus the Expect Us political protestors as a tragedy. First, I discuss six historical events in St. Louis from 1906 to 2021 that contextualize this confrontation. Next, I explore the essence of the rights protected by the First and Second Amendments to the Constitution and how they pertain to this encounter. I then define and apply five overlapping features of Aristotle’s and Kenneth Burke’s accounts of tragedy to consider the implications of this highly publicized event as a microcosm of our presently polarized American society.