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Lana M. Minshew

Bio: Lana M. Minshew is an academic researcher from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The author has contributed to research in topics: Pharmacy & Medicine. The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 20 publications receiving 103 citations.

Papers
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Journal Article
TL;DR: Examination of the classroom practice of two middle grades mathematics and science teachers integrating a 1:1 initiative and the ways they dealt with the barriers in their classroom practices shows how barriers, both internal and external, influence classroom pedagogy.
Abstract: Many schools are beginning to adopt one-to-one computing with the goal of developing students’ 21st-century skills, which allow students not only to learn content but to acquire critical skills (e.g., creativity, collaboration, and digital literacy) that will lead to future careers. Technology offers teachers the ability to transform the quality of instruction—to achieve a more student-centered learning environment, have more differentiated instruction, and develop problem- or projectbased learning, and demand higher order thinking skills. A number of barriers and influences have emerged from the findings of this study on teachers’ practice and integration of technology into their classrooms. This study examines how these barriers, both internal and external, influence classroom pedagogy. Using a technology, pedagogy, and content knowledge (TPACK) framework, this paper examines the classroom practice of two middle grades mathematics and science teachers integrating a 1:1 initiative and the ways they dealt with the barriers in their classroom practices.

36 citations

17 Mar 2014
TL;DR: Kim et al. as mentioned in this paper described the theoretical framework and current progress of a one-to-one tablet initiative at an urban middle school in the southeastern United States and examined the results of the first iterative cycle.
Abstract: This poster details the theoretical framework and current progress of a one-to-one tablet initiative at an urban middle school in the southeastern United States. Results of the first iterative cycle are examined. Issues of teachers’ efficacy with technology and TPACK integration, teachers’ interview data, examples of the collaboration between teachers and researchers around effective technology integration, and observational data will be shared. Introduction and Background Many schools are beginning to adopt one-to-one computing with the goal of developing students’ 21st century skills, which allow students to learn not only content but also acquire critical skills (e.g. creativity, collaboration, and digital literacy) (Pellegrino & Hilton, 2012). Researchers (e.g. Keengwe, Schnellert, & Mills, 2012) have demonstrated that technology integration is essential to meet this goal; however, the existing technology infrastructure is insufficient to develop the desired outcomes of these implementations (Greaves et al., 2012). Currently, there has been little research (e.g. Fleisher, 2012; Greaves et al., 2012) that examines teacher appropriation of the tablets into their pedagogy. Teachers often do not understand or have the time to spend learning about the functionality of the devices. According to Ifenthaler and Schweinbenz (2013), a majority of teachers are open to integrating tablets and feel they would enhance their practice, but others are not confident about using a new device in their everyday instruction. In addition, how teachers actually integrate devices into their practice is often dictated by school culture (Fleisher, 2012; Greaves et al., 2012). When teachers lack the knowledge of how to use technology, their attempts to integrate technology successfully are often limited (Koehler, Mishra, Kereluik, Shin, & Graham, 2014). Others (e.g. Kim et al., 2013) have shown that internal barriers, attitudes, beliefs, and efficacy with technology still impact levels of technology integration. Teachers who have more student-centered pedagogical beliefs are better at integrating technology as a part of their classroom whereas those with teacherdirected pedagogical beliefs are more likely to use technology as enrichment to the lesson (Kim et al., 2013). Using a TPACK framework (Mishra & Koehler, 2006), this research project aims to help middle grades teachers integrate technology effectively and redefine (Puentedura, 2009) teaching and learning in the content areas. The following questions guide our research: 1) How do middle school teachers develop pedagogies that integrate technology within their discipline?; 2) How can teachers integrate tablet computers (e.g. iPads) into content specific applications that move beyond a level of substitution? Theoretical and Methodological Frameworks This study is part of a larger design-based research project (Brown, 1992) that is examining the use of iPads within specific content contexts. Design-based research emerged from the dialectic between theory and design in research, with theory suggesting an improved design and design suggesting new dimensions to theory. While theory and design can and do

27 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Student and pharmacy school characteristics impact the likelihood of pharmacy residency attainment, as indicated by students on the AACP Graduating Student Survey from 2013 to 2015.
Abstract: Objective. To identify student and school level predictors of pharmacy residency attainment.Methods. Data were collected from the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) and the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. Logistic multilevel modeling was used to examine the effects of select student and school level characteristics on pharmacy residency attainment, as indicated by students on the AACP Graduating Student Survey (GSS) from 2013 to 2015.Results. The dataset included 24,351 graduating pharmacy students from 101 schools and colleges of pharmacy. Predictors of residency attainment included working in an institutional pharmacy, female gender, student age, school age, and Research I classification. Nonsignificant variables included curriculum type, class size, and institutional control.Conclusion. Student and pharmacy school characteristics impact the likelihood of pharmacy residency attainment. Further research is needed to understand the mechanisms associated with t...

20 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
18 Mar 2021
TL;DR: In this paper, a 3-station remote Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) was implemented for first-year pharmacy students, and students answered three open-text prompts about the remote OSCE experience: "I liked", "I learned", and "I suggest". Responses were open coded and frequency counts were calculated to determine the most prevalent codes.
Abstract: During the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, many schools quickly transitioned their teaching and assessment strategies to online formats. In Spring 2020, a 3-station remote Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) was implemented for first-year pharmacy students. The day following the remote OSCEs students answered three open-text prompts about the remote OSCE experience: (1) "I liked...", (2) "I learned…", and (3) "I suggest…". Responses were open-coded and frequency counts were calculated to determine the most prevalent codes. Concept maps were created to visualize and explore connections between the codes. Out of 157 students, 156 students completed the reflection assignment, a 99.36% response rate. The three major themes in the Liked data were: Logistics (n = 65, 41.7%), Differences In-person Versus Remote (n = 59, 37.8%), and Skill Development (n = 43, 27.6%). The three major themes in the Learned data were: Technology (n = 66, 42.3%), Communication (n = 58, 37.2%), and Skill Development (n = 56, 35.9%). The three major themes in the Suggest data were: Logistics (n = 89, 57.1%), Technology (n = 31, 19.9%), and Continuation of Remote OSCE (n = 31, 19.9%). Overall, the remote OSCE experience was well-received, and students described it as applicable to their future pharmacy practice. Future work should explore the design, implementation, and outcomes of remote OSCEs.

18 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
09 Sep 2019-PLOS ONE
TL;DR: Depth and breadth of knowledge, communication, collaboration, adaptability, research productivity, experiential training, and motivation and drive were among the themes identified and can be used to inform the development of doctoral curricula in the biomedical sciences.
Abstract: Concerns about the extent to which graduate programs adequately prepare students for the workplace have prompted numerous calls for reform. Understanding what employers look for in doctoral graduates can help schools better align graduate training with workplace needs. Twelve pharmaceutical scientists across diverse specialties and career pathways described the skills considered requisite for success in today's science economy. Depth and breadth of knowledge, communication, collaboration, adaptability, research productivity, experiential training, and motivation and drive were among the themes identified. These results can be used to inform the development of doctoral curricula in the biomedical sciences.

15 citations


Cited by
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01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: The cambridge handbook of the learning sciences is universally compatible with any devices to read and an online access to it is set as public so you can download it instantly.
Abstract: the cambridge handbook of the learning sciences is available in our digital library an online access to it is set as public so you can download it instantly. Our books collection spans in multiple locations, allowing you to get the most less latency time to download any of our books like this one. Merely said, the the cambridge handbook of the learning sciences is universally compatible with any devices to read.

1,059 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2014

108 citations

01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the way in which a culture of educational technology-related policy and curriculum change has arguably resulted in minimal improvement in teaching and learning and argue that such a culture has instead simply increased teacher disengagement and thereby resulted in teachers being erroneously labelled by polichy actors, administrators and technology enthusiasts as'resistant' to change, 'luddites' and 'risk averse'.
Abstract: This chapter explores the way in which a culture of educational technology-related policy and curriculum change has arguably resulted in minimal improvement in teaching and learning. Moreover, it is argued that such a culture of change has instead simply increased teacher disengagement and thereby resulted in teachers being erroneously labelled by polichy actors, administrators and technology enthusiasts as 'resistant' to change, 'luddites' and 'risk averse'. Accordingly, this chapter challenges these simplistic labels, and offers a more critical perspective of how and why teachers (dis)engage with technology.

49 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Significant associations between grit and measures of academic or professional achievement were not detected in this pharmacy student cohort, and the presence of small but significant changes in Grit-S scores over time has implications that further research should be conducted in this area.
Abstract: Objective. To characterize Grit-S scores in pharmacy students, determine whether Grit-S scores change within individual pharmacy students and cohorts over time, and investigate the relationship between Grit-S scores, academic outcomes, and professional outcomes. Methods. A survey was conducted in fall 2016 and again in fall 2017 to determine Grit-S scores in first- through fourth-year pharmacy students. Participant demographic variables, grade point average (GPA), advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) ratings, and residency match results were collected. Results. Over the study period, 852 survey responses were completed by 85% of students surveyed. The mean Grit-S scores of each cohort ranged from 3.5 to 3.7 (on a 5-point scale with 5 representing the highest level of grit). Underrepresented minorities had slightly higher Grit-S scores and first-generation college students had slightly lower Grit-S scores. Two hundred eighty-seven students responded to both the 2016 and 2017 surveys. Among these paired responses, small but significant changes in individual Grit-S scores over time that varied in direction and magnitude by school year were noted. Higher Grit-S scores were not associated with higher GPA or superior APPE performance, nor were they predictive of a student matching to a postgraduate pharmacy residency. Conclusion. Significant associations between grit and measures of academic or professional achievement were not detected in this pharmacy student cohort. The presence of small but significant changes in Grit-S scores over time, in the absence of any intervention, has implications that further research should be conducted in this area.

22 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Findings reveal 15 external barriers that need to be addressed if such initiatives are to become sustainable and fully embedded in educational practice: ICT infrastructure, hardware, software, physical learning spaces, digital textbooks, curriculum, assessment, provision of professional development, training programs, time, timetabling and technical support.

22 citations