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Author

Laura Kastronic

Other affiliations: University of Ottawa
Bio: Laura Kastronic is an academic researcher from University of Toronto. The author has contributed to research in topics: American English & North American English. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 6 publications receiving 30 citations. Previous affiliations of Laura Kastronic include University of Ottawa.

Papers
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01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: This article analyzed the rate of use of discourse like in three distinct structural contexts (CP, DP, and vP) by 39 native English speakers from the Quebec English Corpus (Poplack, et al., 2006) and found that the internal conditioning of like in Quebec English is practically identical to that in Toronto English.
Abstract: This study considers the spread of discourse like in Quebec English. Although several previous studies have examined the pragmatic functions and rate of use of like as a discourse marker, few consider its interaction with the syntactic structure and most focus solely on English-dominant communities. Thus, while D’Arcy (2005) has shown that this discourse feature is spreading systematically throughout the syntactic structure in apparent time in Toronto, it is unknown whether its evolution is as advanced in communities such as Quebec, where English is a minority language, isolated from mainstream varieties. We analyze the rate of use of discourse like in three distinct structural contexts (CP, DP, and vP) by 39 native English speakers from the Quebec English Corpus (Poplack, et al., 2006). Speakers from both Montreal and Quebec City were included in this study since the degree of isolation from mainstream English is arguably greater in the latter. Internal grammatical factors and external factors are also analyzed. The results show that while both Quebec City and Montreal speakers exhibit substantially lower rates than Toronto speakers in their use of like in each of the structural contexts examined, the internal conditioning of like in Quebec English is practically identical to that in Toronto English. These findings only partially support the hypothesis that these speakers’ isolation from mainstream English causes them to lag behind in ongoing change and highlight the complexity involved in the exploration of such a widespread and multifaceted

9 citations

01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: This paper carried out systematic quantitative analyses of the morphological form of verbs embedded under large numbers of mandative subjunctive triggers, and found that selection of the sub-junctive was already sparse in terms of rate and sporadic in termsof triggers as far back as the Early Modern English speech surrogates investigated, and far from reviving over the course of the 20th century, has remained that way ever since.
Abstract: The English mandative subjunctive has had a checkered history, ranging from extensive use in Old English to near extinction by Late Modern English. Then, in a dramatic (if still unexplained) reversal, it was reported to have revived, notably in American English, a scenario which is now widely endorsed. Observing that most references to this revival are based on the written language, we sought to replicate this result in contemporary North American English speech. Finding little evidence of the mandative subjunctive in contexts where revivalist claims would predict it, we next attempted to contextualize the current situation by tracing the trajectory of the mandative subjunctive back to the 16th century via the speech-like portions of two major corpora of English. Adopting a variationist perspective, we carried out systematic quantitative analyses of the morphological form of verbs embedded under large numbers of mandative subjunctive triggers. Results show that selection of the subjunctive was already both sparse in terms of rate and sporadic in terms of triggers as far back as the Early Modern English speech surrogates investigated, and far from reviving over the course of the 20th century, has remained that way ever since. We implicate methodological inconsistencies, in particular violations of the principle of accountability, in the disparities between the findings reported here and the consensus in the literature with respect to the evolution and current status of the mandative subjunctive in North American English. This working paper is available in University of Pennsylvania Working Papers in Linguistics: http://repository.upenn.edu/pwpl/

9 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article examined the alternation between non-standard preterite come and its standard counterpart came in London English and found that the internal conditioning of variant selection is not robust, as inferred from the paucity of significant linguistic effects.
Abstract: This study examines the alternation between non-standard preterite come and its standard counterpart came in London English. A major component of the investigation centers on the comparison of come/came variation in the speech of Anglo (British-heritage) and non-Anglo (migrant-heritage) youth. Rates of preterite come vary markedly across different age cohorts and minority ethnic groups, foregrounding the importance of social factors as key determinants of variant use. By contrast, the internal conditioning of variant selection is not robust, as inferred from the paucity of significant linguistic effects. Similarities in variable patterning in elderly and adolescent Anglo speaker groups nevertheless suggest that shared structural affinities may be due to historical transmission. Conversely, comparison of Anglo and non-Anglo adolescents’ use of come/came variation reveals fewer correspondences in the grammar underlying variable use. The results demonstrate that data from non-Anglo groups contribute to a fuller understanding of come/came variation in an ethnically diverse metropolis.

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors compared the effects of city and ethnicity with respect to Quebec English speakers' participation in two ongoing changes affecting /æ/ in Canadian English: retraction as part of the Canadian Shift and tensing in prenasal environments.
Abstract: This study compares the effects of city and ethnicity with respect to Quebec English speakers’ participation in two ongoing changes affecting /æ/ in Canadian English: retraction as part of the Canadian Shift and tensing in prenasal environments. Quebec English speakers might be expected to differ in their behavior with regard to these two phenomena as compared to other Canadian English speakers. Based on an analysis of Cartesian distances and a mixed-effects model using spontaneous speech, the authors find that Quebec English speakers are less advanced with respect to the Canadian Shift, especially speakers from Quebec City. For tensing, British-origin speakers from Montreal and Quebec City are found to pattern similarly, participating in the more widespread patterning, while Jewish and Italian speakers are moving in the opposite direction. The authors argue that this move away from characteristically Canadian patterns is an artefact of the interplay between the two phenomena under study, reflective of differential replication of the Canadian Shift in the two environments.

2 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2003

1,739 citations

01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: This volume collects three decades of articles by distinguish linguist Joan Bybee, which essentially argue for the importance of frequency of use as a factor in the analysis and explanation of language structure.
Abstract: This volume collects three decades of articles by distinguish linguist Joan Bybee. Her articles essentially argue for the importance of frequency of use as a factor in the analysis and explanation of language structure. Her work has been very influential for a broad range of researchers in linguistics, particularly in discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, phonology, phonetics, and historical linguistics.

584 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

250 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Poplack and Tagliamonte as discussed by the authors described the African American English in the Diaspora as a "disparity" in the 1990s and 2000s, and used it as an example of racism.
Abstract: African American English in the Diaspora: By Shana Poplack and Sali Tagliamonte. Malden, MA. Blackwell. 2001.

71 citations