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Lea F. Santos

Other affiliations: Dartmouth College, Yale University, Michigan State University  ...read more
Bio: Lea F. Santos is an academic researcher from Yeshiva University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Quantum chaos & Quantum. The author has an hindex of 42, co-authored 180 publications receiving 4850 citations. Previous affiliations of Lea F. Santos include Dartmouth College & Yale University.


Papers
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TL;DR: In this article, a review is devoted to the problem of thermalization in a small isolated conglomerate of interacting constituents, where statistical regularities come into play through inter-particle interactions, which have two fundamental components: mean field and residual interactions responsible for the complex structure of actual stationary states.

349 citations

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TL;DR: In this article, level statistics and the structure of the eigenvectors of one-dimensional gapless bosonic and fermionic systems across the transition from integrability to quantum chaos are studied.
Abstract: By means of full exact diagonalization, we study level statistics and the structure of the eigenvectors of one-dimensional gapless bosonic and fermionic systems across the transition from integrability to quantum chaos. These systems are integrable in the presence of only nearest-neighbor terms, whereas the addition of next-nearest-neighbor hopping and interaction may lead to the onset of chaos. We show that the strength of the next-nearest-neighbor terms required to observe clear signatures of nonintegrability is inversely proportional to the system size. Interestingly, the transition to chaos is also seen to depend on particle statistics, with bosons responding first to the integrability breaking terms. In addition, we discuss the use of delocalization measures as main indicators for the crossover from integrability to chaos and the consequent viability of quantum thermalization in isolated systems.

322 citations

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TL;DR: The results for the complexity of the eigenvectors and for the expectation values of few-body observables confirm the validity of the Eigenstate thermalization hypothesis in the chaotic regime, and therefore the occurrence of thermalization.
Abstract: We study how the proximity to an integrable point or to localization as one approaches the atomic limit, as well as the mixing of symmetries in the chaotic domain, may affect the onset of thermalization in finite one-dimensional systems. We consider systems of hard-core bosons at half-filling with nearest-neighbor hopping and interaction, and next-nearest-neighbor interaction. The latter breaks integrability and induces a ground-state superfluid to insulator transition. By full exact diagonalization, we study chaos indicators and few-body observables. We show that when different symmetry sectors are mixed, chaos indicators associated with the eigenvectors, contrary to those related to the eigenvalues, capture the onset of chaos. The results for the complexity of the eigenvectors and for the expectation values of few-body observables confirm the validity of the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis in the chaotic regime, and therefore the occurrence of thermalization. We also study the properties of the off-diagonal matrix elements of few-body observables in relation to the transition from integrability to chaos and from chaos to localization.

181 citations

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TL;DR: The exponential growth of the out-of-time-ordered correlator (OTOC) has been proposed as a quantum signature of classical chaos and is studied in the Dicke model, where two-level atoms cooperatively interact with a quantized radiation field.
Abstract: The exponential growth of the out-of-time-ordered correlator (OTOC) has been proposed as a quantum signature of classical chaos. The growth rate is expected to coincide with the classical Lyapunov exponent. This quantum-classical correspondence has been corroborated for the kicked rotor and the stadium billiard, which are one-body chaotic systems. The conjecture has not yet been validated for realistic systems with interactions. We make progress in this direction by studying the OTOC in the Dicke model, where two-level atoms cooperatively interact with a quantized radiation field. For parameters where the model is chaotic in the classical limit, the OTOC increases exponentially in time with a rate that closely follows the classical Lyapunov exponent.

176 citations

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TL;DR: In this article, the authors studied the survival probability of the isolated one-dimensional Heisenberg model with static random magnetic fields, and identified two distinct behaviors before equilibration.
Abstract: The isolated one-dimensional Heisenberg model with static random magnetic fields has become paradigmatic for the analysis of many-body localization. Here, we study the dynamics of this system initially prepared in a highly-excited nonstationary state. Our focus is on the probability for finding the initial state later in time, the so-called survival probability. Two distinct behaviors are identified before equilibration. At short times, the decay is very fast and equivalent to that of clean systems. It subsequently slows down and develops a power-law behavior with an exponent that coincides with the multifractal dimension of the eigenstates.

155 citations


Cited by
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[...]

08 Dec 2001-BMJ
TL;DR: There is, I think, something ethereal about i —the square root of minus one, which seems an odd beast at that time—an intruder hovering on the edge of reality.
Abstract: There is, I think, something ethereal about i —the square root of minus one. I remember first hearing about it at school. It seemed an odd beast at that time—an intruder hovering on the edge of reality. Usually familiarity dulls this sense of the bizarre, but in the case of i it was the reverse: over the years the sense of its surreal nature intensified. It seemed that it was impossible to write mathematics that described the real world in …

33,785 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the properties of entanglement in many-body systems are reviewed and both bipartite and multipartite entanglements are considered, and the zero and finite temperature properties of entangled states in interacting spin, fermion and boson model systems are discussed.
Abstract: Recent interest in aspects common to quantum information and condensed matter has prompted a flurry of activity at the border of these disciplines that were far distant until a few years ago. Numerous interesting questions have been addressed so far. Here an important part of this field, the properties of the entanglement in many-body systems, are reviewed. The zero and finite temperature properties of entanglement in interacting spin, fermion, and boson model systems are discussed. Both bipartite and multipartite entanglement will be considered. In equilibrium entanglement is shown tightly connected to the characteristics of the phase diagram. The behavior of entanglement can be related, via certain witnesses, to thermodynamic quantities thus offering interesting possibilities for an experimental test. Out of equilibrium entangled states are generated and manipulated by means of many-body Hamiltonians.

3,096 citations

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TL;DR: In this paper, the authors give an overview of recent theoretical and experimental progress in the area of nonequilibrium dynamics of isolated quantum systems, particularly focusing on quantum quenches: the temporal evolution following a sudden or slow change of the coupling constants of the system Hamiltonian.
Abstract: This Colloquium gives an overview of recent theoretical and experimental progress in the area of nonequilibrium dynamics of isolated quantum systems There is particularly a focus on quantum quenches: the temporal evolution following a sudden or slow change of the coupling constants of the system Hamiltonian Several aspects of the slow dynamics in driven systems are discussed and the universality of such dynamics in gapless systems with specific focus on dynamics near continuous quantum phase transitions is emphasized Recent progress on understanding thermalization in closed systems through the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis is also reviewed and relaxation in integrable systems is discussed Finally key experiments probing quantum dynamics in cold atom systems are overviewed and put into the context of our current theoretical understanding

2,340 citations

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TL;DR: In this paper, the authors provide a brief introduction to quantum thermalization, paying particular attention to the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH) and the resulting single-eigenstate statistical mechanics.
Abstract: We review some recent developments in the statistical mechanics of isolated quantum systems. We provide a brief introduction to quantum thermalization, paying particular attention to the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH) and the resulting single-eigenstate statistical mechanics. We then focus on a class of systems that fail to quantum thermalize and whose eigenstates violate the ETH: These are the many-body Anderson-localized systems; their long-time properties are not captured by the conventional ensembles of quantum statistical mechanics. These systems can forever locally remember information about their local initial conditions and are thus of interest for possibilities of storing quantum information. We discuss key features of many-body localization (MBL) and review a phenomenology of the MBL phase. Single-eigenstate statistical mechanics within the MBL phase reveal dynamically stable ordered phases, and phase transitions among them, that are invisible to equilibrium statistical mechanics and...

1,945 citations