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Lev Davidovich Landau

Bio: Lev Davidovich Landau is an academic researcher from Russian Academy of Sciences. The author has contributed to research in topics: Equations of motion & Field (physics). The author has an hindex of 58, co-authored 182 publications receiving 66310 citations.


Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1960
TL;DR: In this article, the propagation of electromagnetic waves and X-ray diffraction of X rays in crystals are discussed. But they do not consider the effects of superconductivity on superconducting conductors.
Abstract: Electrostatics of conductors Static magnetic field Superconductivity The propagation of electromagnetic waves Spatial dispersion Diffraction of X rays in crystals.

12,543 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The principle of relativity Relativistic mechanics Electromagnetic fields electromagnetic waves as discussed by the authors The propagation of light The field of moving charges Radiation of electromagnetic waves Particle in a gravitational field The gravitational field equation
Abstract: The principle of relativity Relativistic mechanics Electromagnetic fields Electromagnetic waves The propagation of light The field of moving charges Radiation of electromagnetic waves Particle in a gravitational field The gravitational field equation The field of gravitational bodies Gravitational waves Relativistic cosmology Index.

9,047 citations

Book
24 Dec 2013

7,127 citations

Book
01 Jan 1951
TL;DR: The equilibrium of rods and plates Elastic waves Dislocations Thermal conduction and viscosity in solids Mechanics of liquid crystals Index as discussed by the authors The equilibrium of rod and plate elastic waves Elastic waves
Abstract: Fundamental equations The equilibrium of rods and plates Elastic waves Dislocations Thermal conduction and viscosity in solids Mechanics of liquid crystals Index.

6,229 citations

Book
01 Jan 1965
TL;DR: The basic concepts of quantum mechanics Energy and momentum Schrodinger's equation Angular momentum Perturbation theory Spin The identity of particles The atom The theory of symmetry Polyatomic molecules Motion in a magnetic field Nuclear structure Elastic collisions Mathematical appendices.
Abstract: The basic concepts of quantum mechanics Energy and momentum Schrodinger's equation Angular momentum Perturbation theory Spin The identity of particles The atom The theory of symmetry Polyatomic molecules Motion in a magnetic field Nuclear structure Elastic collisions Mathematical appendices.

5,955 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Owing to its unusual electronic spectrum, graphene has led to the emergence of a new paradigm of 'relativistic' condensed-matter physics, where quantum relativistic phenomena can now be mimicked and tested in table-top experiments.
Abstract: Graphene is a rapidly rising star on the horizon of materials science and condensed-matter physics. This strictly two-dimensional material exhibits exceptionally high crystal and electronic quality, and, despite its short history, has already revealed a cornucopia of new physics and potential applications, which are briefly discussed here. Whereas one can be certain of the realness of applications only when commercial products appear, graphene no longer requires any further proof of its importance in terms of fundamental physics. Owing to its unusual electronic spectrum, graphene has led to the emergence of a new paradigm of 'relativistic' condensed-matter physics, where quantum relativistic phenomena, some of which are unobservable in high-energy physics, can now be mimicked and tested in table-top experiments. More generally, graphene represents a conceptually new class of materials that are only one atom thick, and, on this basis, offers new inroads into low-dimensional physics that has never ceased to surprise and continues to provide a fertile ground for applications.

35,293 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the basic theoretical aspects of graphene, a one-atom-thick allotrope of carbon, with unusual two-dimensional Dirac-like electronic excitations, are discussed.
Abstract: This article reviews the basic theoretical aspects of graphene, a one-atom-thick allotrope of carbon, with unusual two-dimensional Dirac-like electronic excitations. The Dirac electrons can be controlled by application of external electric and magnetic fields, or by altering sample geometry and/or topology. The Dirac electrons behave in unusual ways in tunneling, confinement, and the integer quantum Hall effect. The electronic properties of graphene stacks are discussed and vary with stacking order and number of layers. Edge (surface) states in graphene depend on the edge termination (zigzag or armchair) and affect the physical properties of nanoribbons. Different types of disorder modify the Dirac equation leading to unusual spectroscopic and transport properties. The effects of electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions in single layer and multilayer graphene are also presented.

20,824 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
10 Nov 2005-Nature
TL;DR: This study reports an experimental study of a condensed-matter system (graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon) in which electron transport is essentially governed by Dirac's (relativistic) equation and reveals a variety of unusual phenomena that are characteristic of two-dimensional Dirac fermions.
Abstract: Quantum electrodynamics (resulting from the merger of quantum mechanics and relativity theory) has provided a clear understanding of phenomena ranging from particle physics to cosmology and from astrophysics to quantum chemistry. The ideas underlying quantum electrodynamics also influence the theory of condensed matter, but quantum relativistic effects are usually minute in the known experimental systems that can be described accurately by the non-relativistic Schrodinger equation. Here we report an experimental study of a condensed-matter system (graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon) in which electron transport is essentially governed by Dirac's (relativistic) equation. The charge carriers in graphene mimic relativistic particles with zero rest mass and have an effective 'speed of light' c* approximately 10(6) m s(-1). Our study reveals a variety of unusual phenomena that are characteristic of two-dimensional Dirac fermions. In particular we have observed the following: first, graphene's conductivity never falls below a minimum value corresponding to the quantum unit of conductance, even when concentrations of charge carriers tend to zero; second, the integer quantum Hall effect in graphene is anomalous in that it occurs at half-integer filling factors; and third, the cyclotron mass m(c) of massless carriers in graphene is described by E = m(c)c*2. This two-dimensional system is not only interesting in itself but also allows access to the subtle and rich physics of quantum electrodynamics in a bench-top experiment.

18,958 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper presents a meta-modelling procedure called "Continuum Methods within MD and MC Simulations 3072", which automates the very labor-intensive and therefore time-heavy and expensive process of integrating discrete and continuous components into a discrete-time model.
Abstract: 6.2.2. Definition of Effective Properties 3064 6.3. Response Properties to Magnetic Fields 3066 6.3.1. Nuclear Shielding 3066 6.3.2. Indirect Spin−Spin Coupling 3067 6.3.3. EPR Parameters 3068 6.4. Properties of Chiral Systems 3069 6.4.1. Electronic Circular Dichroism (ECD) 3069 6.4.2. Optical Rotation (OR) 3069 6.4.3. VCD and VROA 3070 7. Continuum and Discrete Models 3071 7.1. Continuum Methods within MD and MC Simulations 3072

13,286 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Topological superconductors are new states of quantum matter which cannot be adiabatically connected to conventional insulators and semiconductors and are characterized by a full insulating gap in the bulk and gapless edge or surface states which are protected by time reversal symmetry.
Abstract: Topological insulators are new states of quantum matter which cannot be adiabatically connected to conventional insulators and semiconductors. They are characterized by a full insulating gap in the bulk and gapless edge or surface states which are protected by time-reversal symmetry. These topological materials have been theoretically predicted and experimentally observed in a variety of systems, including HgTe quantum wells, BiSb alloys, and Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 crystals. Theoretical models, materials properties, and experimental results on two-dimensional and three-dimensional topological insulators are reviewed, and both the topological band theory and the topological field theory are discussed. Topological superconductors have a full pairing gap in the bulk and gapless surface states consisting of Majorana fermions. The theory of topological superconductors is reviewed, in close analogy to the theory of topological insulators.

11,092 citations