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Linda Royster Beito

Bio: Linda Royster Beito is an academic researcher from University of South Alabama. The author has contributed to research in topics: Classical liberalism & Health care. The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 9 publications receiving 60 citations.

Papers
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Book
08 Apr 2009
TL;DR: The Black Maverick: T. R. M. Howard's Fight for Civil Rights and Economic Power is a valuable contribution to the study of African American life and history.
Abstract: David T. Beito and Linda Royster Beito’s Black Maverick: T. R. M. Howard’s Fight for Civil Rights and Economic Power is a valuable contribution to the study of African American life and history. It is a historically informed biography that offers significant insight into the individuals, organizations, and locales necessary to understand the role and risks assumed by African American entrepreneurs in the Mississippi Delta prior to the 1980s.

17 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Afro-American Hospital of Yazoo City, Mississippi as discussed by the authors was a leading health care supplier for blacks in the Mississippi Delta for nearly 40 years and provided a wide range of medical services.
Abstract: Under the burden of Jim Crow, how did African Americans obtain health care? For nearly 40 years the Afro-American Hospital of Yazoo City, Mississippi, was a leading health care supplier for blacks in the Mississippi Delta. It was founded in 1928 by the Afro-American Sons and Daughters, a black fraternal society, and provided a wide range of medical services. The society, which eventually had 35,000 members, was led by Thomas J. Huddleston, a prosperous black entrepreneur and advocate of Booker T. Washington's self-help philosophy. The hospital had a low death rate compared to other hospitals that served blacks in the South during the period. It ceased operation in 1966 as a fraternal entity after years of increasingly burdensome regulation, competitive pressure from government and third-party health care alternatives, and the migration of younger dues-paying blacks to the North.

17 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The Independent Review does not accept pronouncements of government officials nor the conventional wisdom at face value as mentioned in this paper, and is available on mobile devices or tablets on the Apple App Store, Google Play, or Magzter.
Abstract: Perfect for anyone on the go! The Independent Review is now available on mobile devices or tablets on the Apple App Store, Google Play, or Magzter. Learn More. “The Independent Review does not accept pronouncements of government officials nor the conventional wisdom at face value.” —JOHN R. MACARTHUR, Publisher, Harper’s “The Independent Review is excellent.” —GARY BECKER, Noble Laureate in Economic Sciences

9 citations


Cited by
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Journal Article
TL;DR: The Social Transformation of American Medicine is one of the most comprehensive studies on the rise of the medical profession and the development of the health care industry published to date, Starr is able to span the fields of medicine so that he discusses intelligently the economic, political, and historical developments in medical care.
Abstract: The Social Transformation of American Medicine is one of the most comprehensive studies on the rise of the medical profession and the development of the health care industry published to date, Starr is able to span the fields of medicine so that he discusses intelligently the economic, political, and historical developments in medical care. His wri ting is clear and succinct, his arguments are copiously footnoted, and the inferences he draws are sound. In Book I, he covers \"the rise of medical authority and the shaping of the medical system\"; in Book II, \"doctors, the State, and the coming of the corporation.\" Reviews by Daniel Bell of Harvard and George Silver of Yale call Starr's work brilliant-I would agree. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to understand the current health care system. Starr describes the movement of the medical profession from one that was initially viewed skeptically to one that was later embraced; and now, coming full circle, to one that is viewed critically. Starr maintains that the current status of American medicine is the result of our history of accommodating professional interests while failing to exercise control over health programs, and then needing to adopt piecemeal regulations and cut-backs on programs that become too inflationary, One of the primary messages I take from this book is the importance of a com bination of forces: a profession's authority, the political climate, and the current philosophy about health care. Starr illustrates how these forces coalesce to defeat or achieve medical improvements. As occupational therapists, we are dependent on the development of the health care industry. It is wise for us to understand the forces that have an impact on medical care and what they could mean for our profession, Kay Barbara Schwartz, M.S., OTR

796 citations

Book
01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: Exploring the history and impact of fraternal societies in the United States, David Beito uncovers the vital importance they had in the social and fiscal lives of millions of American families.
Abstract: During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, more Americans belonged to fraternal societies than to any other kind of voluntary association, with the possible exception of churches. Despite the stereotypical image of the lodge as the exclusive domain of white men, fraternalism cut across race, class, and gender lines to include women, African Americans, and immigrants. Exploring the history and impact of fraternal societies in the United States, David Beito uncovers the vital importance they had in the social and fiscal lives of millions of American families. Much more than a means of addressing deep-seated cultural, psychological, and gender needs, fraternal societies gave Americans a way to provide themselves with social-welfare services that would otherwise have been inaccessible, Beito argues. In addition to creating vast social and mutual aid networks among the poor and in the working class, they made affordable life and health insurance available to their members and established hospitals, orphanages, and homes for the elderly. Fraternal societies continued their commitment to mutual aid even into the early years of the Great Depression, Beito says, but changing cultural attitudes and the expanding welfare state eventually propelled their decline. |David Beito's book establishes the enormous impact of fraternal societies on the social lives and fiscal circumstances of millions of Americans between 1890 and 1967. In addition to creating vast social and mutual aid networks for the poor and the working class, fraternal organizations offered insurance policies to members and established hospitals, orphanages, and homes for the elderly.

122 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: From Mutual Aid to the Welfare State: Fraternal Societies and Social Services, by David T Beito, 2000, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press as discussed by the authors provides an interesting, extremely well researched, and insightful history of American fraternal societies during this period.
Abstract: From Mutual Aid to the Welfare State: Fraternal Societies and Social Services, 18901967, by David T Beito, 2000, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press Civil society encompasses the variety of human interactions that fill the social, economic, and political space between the institutions of the state and the private life of self and family In recent years, a number of public intellectuals have raised concerns about the decline of "social capital," the network of connections among individuals, within civil society They selectively point to particular sorts of organizational activity in apparent decline and seek to link the implied loss of social capital to declines in everything from health to democracy Fraternal societies, characterized by the strong reciprocal relations and trust so valued by social capital theorists, experienced substantial growth and then decline in importance and membership over the last century The author provides an interesting, extremely well researched, and insightful history of American fraternal societies during this period His analysis calls for reconsideration of the too easily dismissed hypothesis that the growing welfare state helped displace organizational participation, and it suggests the importance of interpreting the economic environment in assessing the character of civil society As a primary function of the fraternal organizations was the provision of insurance to their members, readers of the Journal of Risk and Insurance with a historical bent are likely to find this account interesting From Mutual Aid to the Welfare State shows the author's skill as a professional historian He draws on a variety of primary documents, statistical sources, and interviews to tell a very rich story He begins with overviews of the mutual aid societies, such as the Loyal Order of the Moose, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Ladies of the Maccabees, that were so prominent in the life of Americans, blacks and whites, men and women, during the early part of the last century-in 1920 membership was as high as one out of three adult men, and societies provided more than $9 billion in life insurance coverage (p 2) The fraternal organizations shared a belief in the desirability of reciprocal aid over charity and dependence, and promoted personal habits of thrift and responsibility Almost all of the societies provided some form of insurance-life, burial, sickness, medical, and even tontines Subsequent chapters provide detailed accounts of several sorts of in-kind provision of assistance: Homes for children of deceased members (Mooseheart and the Children's Home of the Security Benefit Association), medical services through capitation contracts with doctors (so-called lodge practice), the creation of hospitals and sanitariums (the hospital established in Kansas for members by the Security Benefit Association, the hospital established in Mississippi for black members by the International Order of the Twelve Knights and the Daughters of Tabor, and the tuberculosis sanitarium established in Colorado for members by the Modern Woodman of America) The final chapters consider the response of the fraternal organizations to the stress of the Great Depression and postwar trends in membership The development of the fraternal organizations cannot be understood without considering their role in providing insurance to their members The oldest fraternal societies provided funeral benefits so that members could avoid the disgrace of paupers' graves With industrialization, sickness benefits, which provided dollar payments during periods when illness or injury prevented members from working, became common Interestingly, moral hazard was reduced by not guaranteeing benefits and by tying them to responsible behavior; adverse selection was controlled through conditions of membership that stressed personal responsibility Many societies provided life insurance Rather than maintain reserves, societies originally relied on occasional assessments of members to cover losses …

88 citations