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Lindy J. Thompson

Bio: Lindy J. Thompson is an academic researcher from University of KwaZulu-Natal. The author has contributed to research in topics: Vulture & Geography. The author has an hindex of 8, co-authored 27 publications receiving 176 citations. Previous affiliations of Lindy J. Thompson include University of Reading & Hawk Mountain Sanctuary.
Topics: Vulture, Geography, Hooded vulture, Nest, Eagle

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Oct 2007-Ethology
TL;DR: Brightnessdependent reactions of parent owls suggest that visual signalling may be more widely employed than previously thought, and studying birds at night may reveal sophisticated strategies of animal communication.
Abstract: Complex begging display by bird offspring has predominantly been investigated in diurnal species, which have conspicuous gape colours or plumage features. In nocturnal species, in contrast, such visual communication has received little attention because the assumption is that they exclusively rely on vocal communication. Here, we use a field experiment to investigate whether eagle owls, Bubo bubo, communicate through visual signals at night. We artificially decreased the brightness of the white feathers surrounding fledgling eagle owls’ mouths during the post-fledging dependence period, and investigated the effect of this treatment by comparing the condition of these birds to that of birds who received a control treatment. Several physiological parameters considered in our analyses indicate that control owlets were in better condition than owlets with brightness-reduced mouth feathers, which suggests that they received more or better food from feeding parents who discriminated between those young. Brightnessdependent reactions of parent owls suggest that visual signalling may be more widely employed than previously thought, and studying birds at night may reveal sophisticated strategies of animal communication.

36 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Examination of the effects of seasonal changes in ambient temperatures of captive-bred rose-ringed parakeets suggests that this species is physiologically and behaviorally equipped to cope with a range of climatic situations and this partly explains their global success as an invader species.

19 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, admissions records from a raptor rehabilitation centre in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, were analyzed for trends, showing that the most frequent known causes of injury to raptors were motor vehicle accidents and injuries caused when birds flew into buildings.
Abstract: With many species of southern African raptors becoming increasingly threatened, records from rehabilitation centres can give an indication of the threats faced by birds of prey in particular areas and to particular species. Thus, admissions records from a raptor rehabilitation centre in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, were analysed for trends. Over eight years (2004–2011), 547 birds from 39 raptor species were admitted to the centre. The majority of individuals were spotted eagle-owls (16.6%), western barn owls (15.2%) and yellow-billed kites (9.7%). The most frequent known causes of injury to raptors were motor vehicle accidents and injuries caused when birds flew into buildings. There was no significant difference in admissions of motor vehicle collision cases between seasons. People generally waited 3.8 days before bringing injured raptors in to the centre, and approximately half of the birds admitted were fed within that time, highlighting a need for public education regarding the general diets of raptor...

17 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the use of vultures in traditional medicine in the Kruger to Canyons Biosphere Region, South Africa, was assessed by conducting questionnaires with 51 traditional healers from the Kukula Traditional Health Practitioners Association in Bushbuckridge, Mpumalanga Province.
Abstract: Vultures provide crucial ecological, economic, and cultural benefits, yet many Old World populations are declining. The illegal trade in vultures for traditional medicines (known as muthi in South Africa) is widely regarded as an important threat to the conservation of African vultures, but there are relatively few studies on the acquisition and trade in vultures for traditional medicine, which limits our understanding (and the effective mitigation) of this threat. We assessed the use of vultures in traditional medicine in the Kruger to Canyons Biosphere Region, South Africa, by conducting questionnaires with 51 traditional healers from the Kukula Traditional Health Practitioners Association in Bushbuckridge, Mpumalanga Province. Traditional healers reported that vulture body parts were used alone, or in combination with plants or minerals, for various purposes, primarily to give clairvoyant abilities, but also to promote good dreams or increased intelligence, to treat illnesses, and to appease the ancestors. Vultures were acquired (for use in traditional medicine) by poisoning and trapping in communal rangelands and inside protected areas (the Kruger National Park, Manyeleti Game Reserve, Sabi Sands Game Reserve, and Bushbuckridge Nature Reserve). Vultures reportedly varied in price from ZAR300 to ZAR1500 (approximately US$17 to US$85) for a whole bird. We estimate that this association of traditional health practitioners uses 400–800 vultures a year. Our survey respondents expressed concern that acquiring vultures through poisoning is unsustainable, because birds are killed en masse, and this may reduce the sustainability of vulture populations for traditional use by future generations. Our respondents suggested the Greater Honeyguide (Indicator indicator) and honey badger (Mellivora capensis) as alternatives for vultures in traditional medicine. There is a need for better law enforcement in our study area to reduce the threat that illegal killing for traditional medicine poses to the region's vultures.

14 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Vultures are a key component of an effective scavenger guild and have evolved a number of adaptations that allow them to locate and dispose of carcasses quickly and efficiently.
Abstract: Vultures are a key component of an effective scavenger guild and have evolved a number of adaptations that allow them to locate and dispose of carcasses quickly and efficiently. The continuing decline of African vultures is threatening the stability of the African scavenger guild, which may result in increased carcass decomposition times and thus, more rapid development of pathogenic bacteria. The absence of competitive regulation by these apex scavengers may also result in changes in the composition of the vertebrate scavenger guild, with an increase in mammalian scavengers giving rise to increased contact rates at carcasses, which may increase the risk of viral disease transmission to humans, livestock, and other wildlife. Although the economic value of vultures in terms of the sanitation services they provide has been evaluated, their contribution to the economics of human health and veterinary care remains to be quantified. Efforts to do so are hampered by lack of data, as well as a number of confounding factors that may mask causality, such as improved disease prevention and surveillance systems. However, the circumstantial nature of the link between vultures and disease prevention should not deter efforts to conserve them, as their regulation of mammalian scavengers and the sanitation services they provide place them firmly within the sphere of One Health, thereby warranting their urgent protection. The restoration of vulture populations and the ecosystem services they provide will benefit the welfare of all humans, but particularly those who are most vulnerable to economic instability and the spillover of disease at the human-wildlife-livestock interface.

14 citations


Cited by
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Journal Article
TL;DR: In this paper, a test based on two conserved CHD (chromo-helicase-DNA-binding) genes that are located on the avian sex chromosomes of all birds, with the possible exception of the ratites (ostriches, etc.).

2,554 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
08 Oct 2004-Science

836 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this paper, the characteristics of POPs are given and the kind, structure, usage and harm of twelve POPs inhibited by STOCKHOLM CONVENTION are introduced.
Abstract: In this paper, the characteristics of POPs are given. The kind, structure, usage and harm of twelve POPs inhibited by STOCKHOLM CONVENTION are introduced. In addtion, the status of POPs in China is also given.

144 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 May 1971-Nature
TL;DR: A Field Guide to the Birds of Southern Africa by O P M Prozesky Pp 350 + 40 plates (Collins: London, January 1971) £250 as discussed by the authors, £250
Abstract: African Birds of Prey By Leslie Brown Pp 320 + 12 plates (Collins: London, February 1971) £225 A Field Guide to the Birds of Southern Africa By O P M Prozesky Pp 350 + 40 plates (Collins: London, January 1971) £250

99 citations