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Lisa M. Campbell

Bio: Lisa M. Campbell is an academic researcher from Duke University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Marine conservation & Marine protected area. The author has an hindex of 40, co-authored 97 publications receiving 5182 citations. Previous affiliations of Lisa M. Campbell include University of Exeter & University of Western Ontario.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a list of priority research questions was assembled based on the opinions of 35 sea turtle researchers from 13 nations working in fields related to sea turtle biology and/or conservation.
Abstract: Over the past 3 decades, the status of sea turtles and the need for their protection to aid population recovery have increasingly captured the interest of government agencies, non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and the general public worldwide. This interest has been matched by increased research attention, focusing on a wide variety of topics relating to sea turtle biology and ecology, together with the interrelations of sea turtles with the physical and natural environments. Although sea turtles have been better studied than most other marine fauna, management actions and their evaluation are often hindered by the lack of data on turtle biology, human–turtle interactions, turtle population status and threats. In an effort to inform effective sea turtle conservation a list of priority research questions was assembled based on the opinions of 35 sea turtle researchers from 13 nations working in fields related to turtle biology and/or conservation. The combined experience of the contributing researchers spanned the globe as well as many relevant disciplines involved in conservation research. An initial list of more than 200 questions gathered from respondents was condensed into 20 metaquestions and classified under 5 categories: reproductive biology, biogeography, population ecology, threats and conservation strategies.

522 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review of the literature in both fields and on the authors' research and experience with participatory development and community-based conservation can be found in this article, where the authors examine the connections between the concepts, the implications of participation for community based conservation, and the reasons for the differences in their conceptualization and implementation.
Abstract: This paper traces the evolution as well as key elements, and provides examples of implementation of participatory development and community-based conservation, two concepts that resemble distant cousins in the intersecting worlds of development assistance and environmental conservation. The paper examines the connections between the concepts, the implications of participatory development for community-based conservation, and the reasons for the differences in their conceptualization and implementation. The paper is based on a review of the literature in both fields and on the authors' research and experience with participatory development and community-based conservation. Several keys to understanding the disconnection between the concepts emerge; intellectual and pragmatic origins of and impetus for the concepts, the expertise and interests of their promoters, and the differing emphasis on participation as means versus end. Results may inform our understandings of why many participatory approaches to conservation have failed to achieve meaningful participation in practice.

359 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors consider the ad hoc development of ecotourism at Ostional, Costa Rica, and the potential benefits for the local community in the absence of government planning or intervention.

293 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Lisa M. Campbell1
TL;DR: In this article, the authors outline some practical and philosophical obstacles to interdisciplinary research in general, offer illustrative examples from my own experience, and make some suggestions for overcoming them.
Abstract: Mascia et al.’s (2003) call for increased interdisciplinary approaches to conservation and Thornhill’s (2003) response detailing activities of the Society for Conservation Biology reflect an evolution in thinking about environmental problems. We have moved beyond Hilborn and Ludwig’s (1993) call to consider the human context of such problems to addressing them in an interdisciplinary manner and training researchers to do this (Zarin et al. 2003). I fully support efforts to make conservation research, work, and training more interdisciplinary. I believe interdisciplinary approaches are critical for successful conservation and find collaborations personally and professionally rewarding (Campbell 2003). Participants approaching an interdisciplinary collaboration for the first time, however, must recognize potential obstacles from the outset, not the least of which are “obstructive misconceptions or prejudices [that social and natural scientists have] about each other” (Redclift 1998:179). I have written about the challenges of doing social science research in the biologist-dominated field of sea turtle conservation (Campbell 2003). Here, I outline some practical and philosophical obstacles to interdisciplinary research in general, offer illustrative examples from my own experience, and make some suggestions for overcoming them. Many suggestions are directed at conservation biologists, because they are the primary audience for this journal, but are relevant for all participants in an interdisciplinary undertaking. Mascia et al. (2003) address professional societies, conservation organizations, and teaching in the academy. Here, I focus on interdisciplinary research and publishing.

262 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors track a relatively new term in global environmental governance: "blue economy" and track how the term entered into use and how it was articulated within four competing discourses regarding human-ocean relations: (a) oceans as natural capital, (b), oceans as good business, oceans as integral to Pacific Small Island Developing States, and oceans as small-scale fisheries livelihoods.
Abstract: In this article, we track a relatively new term in global environmental governance: “blue economy.” Analyzing preparatory documentation and data collected at the 2012 UN Conference on Sustainable Development (i.e., Rio + 20), we show how the term entered into use and how it was articulated within four competing discourses regarding human–ocean relations: (a) oceans as natural capital, (b) oceans as good business, (c) oceans as integral to Pacific Small Island Developing States, and (d) oceans as small-scale fisheries livelihoods. Blue economy was consistently invoked to connect oceans with Rio + 20’s “green economy” theme; however, different actors worked to further define the term in ways that prioritized particular oceans problems, solutions, and participants. It is not clear whether blue economy will eventually be understood singularly or as the domain of a particular actor or discourse. We explore possibilities as well as discuss discourse in global environmental governance as powerful and precarious.

250 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A forum to review, analyze and stimulate the development, testing and implementation of mitigation and adaptation strategies at regional, national and global scales as mentioned in this paper, which contributes to real-time policy analysis and development as national and international policies and agreements are discussed.
Abstract: ▶ Addresses a wide range of timely environment, economic and energy topics ▶ A forum to review, analyze and stimulate the development, testing and implementation of mitigation and adaptation strategies at regional, national and global scales ▶ Contributes to real-time policy analysis and development as national and international policies and agreements are discussed and promulgated ▶ 94% of authors who answered a survey reported that they would definitely publish or probably publish in the journal again

2,587 citations

Book Chapter
01 Jan 2010

1,556 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Oct 1993-Nature
TL;DR: Mitsch et al. as mentioned in this paper published a Journal of Ecological Engineering (JEE) article with the title of "The Future of Ecology: A Review of Recent Developments".
Abstract: Ecological Engineering: Journal of Ecotechnology. Editor-in-chief William J. Mitsch. Elsevier. 4/yr. DFL 361, $195.

1,161 citations

01 Jan 1992
TL;DR: The body politics of Julia Kristeva and the Body Politics of JuliaKristeva as discussed by the authors are discussed in detail in Section 5.1.1 and Section 6.2.1.
Abstract: Preface (1999) Preface (1990) 1. Subjects of Sex/Gender/Desire I. 'Women' as the Subject of Feminism II. The Compulsory Order of Sex/Gender/Desire III. Gender: The Circular Ruins of Contemporary Debate IV. Theorizing the Binary, the Unitary and Beyond V. Identity, Sex and the Metaphysics of Substance VI. Language, Power and the Strategies of Displacement 2. Prohibition, Psychoanalysis, and the Production of the Heterosexual Matrix I. Structuralism's Critical Exchange II. Lacan, Riviere, and the Strategies of Masquerade III. Freud and the Melancholia of Gender IV. Gender Complexity and the Limits of Identification V. Reformulating Prohibition as Power 3. Subversive Bodily Acts I. The Body Politics of Julia Kristeva II. Foucault, Herculine, and the Politics of Sexual Discontinuity III. Monique Wittig - Bodily Disintegration and Fictive Sex IV. Bodily Inscriptions, Performative Subversions Conclusion - From Parody to Politics

1,125 citations