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Lisa M. Rasmussen

Bio: Lisa M. Rasmussen is an academic researcher from University of North Carolina at Charlotte. The author has contributed to research in topics: Bioethics & Translation (biology). The author has an hindex of 9, co-authored 39 publications receiving 296 citations. Previous affiliations of Lisa M. Rasmussen include University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill & Rice University.

Papers
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TL;DR: Having a national policy for research misconduct was positively associated with research and development funding ranking and intensiveness and countries should seek to harmonize and clarify misconduct definitions and develop procedures for adjudicating conflicts when harmonization does not occur.
Abstract: Research misconduct is an international concern. Misconduct policies can play a crucial role in preventing and policing research misconduct, and many institutions have developed their own policies. While institutional policies play a key role in preventing and policing misconduct, national policies are also important to ensure consistent promulgation and enforcement of ethical standards. The purpose of this study was to obtain more information about research misconduct policies across the globe. We found that twenty-two of the top forty research and development funding countries (55%) had a national misconduct policy. Four countries (18.2%) are in the process of developing a policy, and four (18.2%) have a national research ethics code but no misconduct policy. All twenty-two countries (100%) with national policies included fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism in the definition of misconduct, but beyond that there was considerable diversity. Unethical authorship was mentioned in 54.6% of the miscond...

104 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A standard of justified decision-making in this context would enable us to identify experts who could achieve these standards more often than others, and thus provide a basis for expertise in clinical ethics consultation.
Abstract: The attempt to critique the profession of clinical ethics consultation by establishing the impossibility of ethics expertise has been a red herring. Decisions made in clinical ethics cases are almost never based purely on moral judgments. Instead, they are all-things-considered judgments that involve determining how to balance other values as well. A standard of justified decision-making in this context would enable us to identify experts who could achieve these standards more often than others, and thus provide a basis for expertise in clinical ethics consultation. This expertise relies in part on what Richard Zaner calls the "expert knowledge of ethical phenomena" (1988, 8).

31 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A major obstacle to broad support of clinical ethics consultation (CEC) is suspicion regarding the nature of the moral expertise it claims to offer.
Abstract: The legitimacy of clinical ethics consultation is often implied to rest on the legitimacy of moral expertise. In turn, moral expertise seems subject to many serious critiques, the success of which implies that clinical ethics consultation is illegitimate. I explore a number of these critiques, and forward "ethics expertise," as distinct from "moral expertise," as a way of avoiding these critiques. I argue that "ethics expertise" succeeds in avoiding most of the critiques, captures what clinical ethics consultants might justifiably do, and expresses a subject matter which can be taught and assessed.

27 citations

Book
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: In Search of Ethics Expertise Part I: A Guided Historical Tour 1 Scott LaBarge Socrates and moral expertise Part II: Contemporary Perspectives 2 as discussed by the authors The Ineffable and the Incalculable: GE Moore on Moral Expertise
Abstract: Acknowledgments Lisa M Rasmussen Introduction: In Search of Ethics Expertise Part I: A Guided Historical Tour 1 Scott LaBarge Socrates and Moral Expertise 2 Carrie-Ann Biondi Khan Aristotle's Moral Expert: The Phronimos 3 Chris Tollefsen Hume on True and False Philosophy 4 Dale E Miller Moral Expertise: A Millian Perspective 5 Ben Eggleston The Ineffable and the Incalculable: GE Moore on Moral Expertise 6 Griffin Trotter Pragmatism and Ethical Expertise Part II: Contemporary Perspectives 7 Mary Ann Cutter Expert Moral Choice in Medicine: A Study of Uncertainty and Locality 8 Corinna Delkeskamp-Hayes Societal Consensus and the Problem of Consent: Refocusing the Problem of Ethics Expertise in Liberal Democracies 9 Lisa S Parker Ethical Expertise, Maternal Thinking, and the Work of Clinical Ethicists Part III: Contemporary Applications 10 Robert Veatch The Roles of Scientific and Normative Expertise in Public Policy Formation: The Anthrax Vaccine Case 11 Kenneth Cust Philosophers Return to the Agora 12 Stephen Wear Ethical Expertise in the Clinical Setting 13 Ana Smith Iltis Bioethical Expertise in Health Care Organizations 14 Kenneth Kipnis The Expert Ethics Witness as Teacher Notes on Contributors

25 citations


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TL;DR: A physician friend of mine recently was caring for a critically ill infant who was dying and the physician told me that, as a physician, he had the right and the duty to refuse to provide treatment any longer because the effort was `futile'.
Abstract: A physician friend of mine recently was caring for a critically ill infant who was dying. The infant's mother insisted that the infant be treated with maximal life support as long as possible. The physician told me that, as a physician, he had the right and the duty to refuse to provide treatment any longer because the effort was `futile'. I pressed him about how he knew he was doing the morally right thing. When I did, he cited the opinion of an American professional physician organization of which he was a member. He seemed to believe that he could prove he was right by citing the moral stand of this group as if it were the definitive authority in biomedical ethics. I pressed him again asking how he knew his group had the right answer. He then claimed that the majority of medical professional organizations in the United States held the same view. I, of course, could ask how he could know that unilaterally withholding care deemed futile was morally right just because the majority of American professional organizations believed it was. And then he might have appealed to some moral consensus of all medical professionals of all time throughout the world. If he did, I still would not have been satisfied. I would have disagreed with him factually. It is clear that not all physicians in history have considered it morally right to unilaterally withhold treatment they deem futile. More critically, I would have disagreed with him epistemologically. I would have disagreed with his implication that one could prove a physician's behavior is morally right by appealing to the consensus of physician opinion. Even if all physicians throughout history have believed some behavior is morally right, that does not make them right. Had he then cited the opinion of a religious group or a national court or the International Court of Justice, I would have been left with the same question: how do we know a position in biomedical ethics is right just because some group or another approves? At this point, ethics desperately searches for a foundation Ð a metaphysical rock-bottom, a grounding or source from whence Bioethics ISSN 0269-9702 Volume 13 Number 3/4 1999

324 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The second edition of the Core Competencies for Health Care Ethics Consultation report of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities summarizes the core knowledge and skills competencies identified in the first edition, providing evidence of their endorsement as health care ethics consultation standards.
Abstract: Ethics consultation has become an integral part of the fabric of U.S. health care delivery. This article summarizes the second edition of the Core Competencies for Health Care Ethics Consultation report of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities. The core knowledge and skills competencies identified in the first edition of Core Competencies have been adopted by various ethics consultation services and education programs, providing evidence of their endorsement as health care ethics consultation (HCEC) standards. This revised report was prompted by thinking in the field that has evolved since the original report. Patients, family members, and health care providers who encounter ethical questions or concerns that ethics consultants could help address deserve access to efficient, effective, and accountable HCEC services. All individuals providing such services should be held to the standards of competence and quality described in the revised report.

124 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: For decades, scholars in the social sciences and humanities have questioned the appropriateness and utility of prior review of their research by human subjects' ethics committees as discussed by the authors, and they have organized thematically some of their published complaints and to serve as a brief restatement of the major critiques of ethics review.
Abstract: For decades, scholars in the social sciences and humanities have questioned the appropriateness and utility of prior review of their research by human subjects' ethics committees. This essay seeks to organize thematically some of their published complaints and to serve as a brief restatement of the major critiques of ethics review. In particular, it argues that 1) ethics committees impose silly restrictions, 2) ethics review is a solution in search of a problem, 3) ethics committees lack expertise, 4) ethics committees apply inappropriate principles, 5) ethics review harms the innocent, and 6) better options exist.

115 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: These Japanese and American data suggest somewhat different concerns and assumptions about human life and the relation of the person to the wider social world, but indicate similar concerns about the process of medicalised dying and the creation of meaning for those involved.

114 citations