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Lixia Zhang

Other affiliations: Colorado State University, Henan Normal University, DARPA  ...read more
Bio: Lixia Zhang is an academic researcher from University of California, Los Angeles. The author has contributed to research in topics: The Internet & Network packet. The author has an hindex of 93, co-authored 351 publications receiving 47817 citations. Previous affiliations of Lixia Zhang include Colorado State University & Henan Normal University.


Papers
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01 Sep 1997
TL;DR: RSVP as discussed by the authors is a resource reservation setup protocol designed for an integrated services Internet that provides receiver-initiated setup of resource reservations for multicast or unicast data flows, with good scaling and robustness properties.
Abstract: This memo describes version 1 of RSVP, a resource reservation setup protocol designed for an integrated services Internet. RSVP provides receiver-initiated setup of resource reservations for multicast or unicast data flows, with good scaling and robustness properties.

2,984 citations

01 Oct 2000
TL;DR: This document describes the Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP), which is designed to transport PSTN signaling messages over IP networks, but is capable of broader applications.
Abstract: This document describes the Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP). SCTP is designed to transport PSTN signaling messages over IP networks, but is capable of broader applications.

2,270 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
28 Jul 2014
TL;DR: The NDN project investigates Van Jacobson's proposed evolution from today's host-centric network architecture (IP) to a data-centricnetwork architecture (NDN), which has far-reaching implications for how the authors design, develop, deploy, and use networks and applications.
Abstract: Named Data Networking (NDN) is one of five projects funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation under its Future Internet Architecture Program. NDN has its roots in an earlier project, Content-Centric Networking (CCN), which Van Jacobson first publicly presented in 2006. The NDN project investigates Jacobson's proposed evolution from today's host-centric network architecture (IP) to a data-centric network architecture (NDN). This conceptually simple shift has far-reaching implications for how we design, develop, deploy, and use networks and applications. We describe the motivation and vision of this new architecture, and its basic components and operations. We also provide a snapshot of its current design, development status, and research challenges. More information about the project, including prototype implementations, publications, and annual reports, is available on named-data.net.

2,060 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Oct 1994
TL;DR: This paper studies media access protocols for a single channel wireless LAN being developed at Xerox Corporation's Palo Alto Research Center and develops a new protocol, MACAW, which uses an RTS-CTS-DS-DATA-ACK message exchange and includes a significantly different backoff algorithm.
Abstract: In recent years, a wide variety of mobile computing devices has emerged, including portables, palmtops, and personal digital assistants. Providing adequate network connectivity for these devices will require a new generation of wireless LAN technology. In this paper we study media access protocols for a single channel wireless LAN being developed at Xerox Corporation's Palo Alto Research Center. We start with the MACA media access protocol first proposed by Karn [9] and later refined by Biba [3] which uses an RTS-CTS-DATA packet exchange and binary exponential back-off. Using packet-level simulations, we examine various performance and design issues in such protocols. Our analysis leads to a new protocol, MACAW, which uses an RTS-CTS-DS-DATA-ACK message exchange and includes a significantly different backoff algorithm.

2,000 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Lixia Zhang1, Stephen Deering1, Deborah Estrin, Scott Shenker, Daniel Zappala 
TL;DR: The resource reservation protocol (RSVP) as discussed by the authors is a receiver-oriented simplex protocol that provides receiver-initiated reservations to accommodate heterogeneity among receivers as well as dynamic membership changes.
Abstract: A resource reservation protocol (RSVP), a flexible and scalable receiver-oriented simplex protocol, is described. RSVP provides receiver-initiated reservations to accommodate heterogeneity among receivers as well as dynamic membership changes; separates the filters from the reservation, thus allowing channel changing behavior; supports a dynamic and robust multipoint-to-multipoint communication model by taking a soft-state approach in maintaining resource reservations; and decouples the reservation and routing functions. A simple network configuration with five hosts connected by seven point-to-point links and three switches is presented to illustrate how RSVP works. Related work and unresolved issues are discussed. >

1,470 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work develops and analyzes low-energy adaptive clustering hierarchy (LEACH), a protocol architecture for microsensor networks that combines the ideas of energy-efficient cluster-based routing and media access together with application-specific data aggregation to achieve good performance in terms of system lifetime, latency, and application-perceived quality.
Abstract: Networking together hundreds or thousands of cheap microsensor nodes allows users to accurately monitor a remote environment by intelligently combining the data from the individual nodes. These networks require robust wireless communication protocols that are energy efficient and provide low latency. We develop and analyze low-energy adaptive clustering hierarchy (LEACH), a protocol architecture for microsensor networks that combines the ideas of energy-efficient cluster-based routing and media access together with application-specific data aggregation to achieve good performance in terms of system lifetime, latency, and application-perceived quality. LEACH includes a new, distributed cluster formation technique that enables self-organization of large numbers of nodes, algorithms for adapting clusters and rotating cluster head positions to evenly distribute the energy load among all the nodes, and techniques to enable distributed signal processing to save communication resources. Our results show that LEACH can improve system lifetime by an order of magnitude compared with general-purpose multihop approaches.

10,296 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: When n identical randomly located nodes, each capable of transmitting at W bits per second and using a fixed range, form a wireless network, the throughput /spl lambda/(n) obtainable by each node for a randomly chosen destination is /spl Theta/(W//spl radic/(nlogn)) bits persecond under a noninterference protocol.
Abstract: When n identical randomly located nodes, each capable of transmitting at W bits per second and using a fixed range, form a wireless network, the throughput /spl lambda/(n) obtainable by each node for a randomly chosen destination is /spl Theta/(W//spl radic/(nlogn)) bits per second under a noninterference protocol. If the nodes are optimally placed in a disk of unit area, traffic patterns are optimally assigned, and each transmission's range is optimally chosen, the bit-distance product that can be transported by the network per second is /spl Theta/(W/spl radic/An) bit-meters per second. Thus even under optimal circumstances, the throughput is only /spl Theta/(W//spl radic/n) bits per second for each node for a destination nonvanishingly far away. Similar results also hold under an alternate physical model where a required signal-to-interference ratio is specified for successful receptions. Fundamentally, it is the need for every node all over the domain to share whatever portion of the channel it is utilizing with nodes in its local neighborhood that is the reason for the constriction in capacity. Splitting the channel into several subchannels does not change any of the results. Some implications may be worth considering by designers. Since the throughput furnished to each user diminishes to zero as the number of users is increased, perhaps networks connecting smaller numbers of users, or featuring connections mostly with nearby neighbors, may be more likely to be find acceptance.

9,008 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 1996
TL;DR: This paper presents a protocol for routing in ad hoc networks that uses dynamic source routing that adapts quickly to routing changes when host movement is frequent, yet requires little or no overhead during periods in which hosts move less frequently.
Abstract: An ad hoc network is a collection of wireless mobile hosts forming a temporary network without the aid of any established infrastructure or centralized administration. In such an environment, it may be necessary for one mobile host to enlist the aid of other hosts in forwarding a packet to its destination, due to the limited range of each mobile host’s wireless transmissions. This paper presents a protocol for routing in ad hoc networks that uses dynamic source routing. The protocol adapts quickly to routing changes when host movement is frequent, yet requires little or no overhead during periods in which hosts move less frequently. Based on results from a packet-level simulation of mobile hosts operating in an ad hoc network, the protocol performs well over a variety of environmental conditions such as host density and movement rates. For all but the highest rates of host movement simulated, the overhead of the protocol is quite low, falling to just 1% of total data packets transmitted for moderate movement rates in a network of 24 mobile hosts. In all cases, the difference in length between the routes used and the optimal route lengths is negligible, and in most cases, route lengths are on average within a factor of 1.01 of optimal.

8,256 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Aug 2000
TL;DR: Greedy Perimeter Stateless Routing is presented, a novel routing protocol for wireless datagram networks that uses the positions of routers and a packet's destination to make packet forwarding decisions and its scalability on densely deployed wireless networks is demonstrated.
Abstract: We present Greedy Perimeter Stateless Routing (GPSR), a novel routing protocol for wireless datagram networks that uses the positions of routers and a packet's destination to make packet forwarding decisions. GPSR makes greedy forwarding decisions using only information about a router's immediate neighbors in the network topology. When a packet reaches a region where greedy forwarding is impossible, the algorithm recovers by routing around the perimeter of the region. By keeping state only about the local topology, GPSR scales better in per-router state than shortest-path and ad-hoc routing protocols as the number of network destinations increases. Under mobility's frequent topology changes, GPSR can use local topology information to find correct new routes quickly. We describe the GPSR protocol, and use extensive simulation of mobile wireless networks to compare its performance with that of Dynamic Source Routing. Our simulations demonstrate GPSR's scalability on densely deployed wireless networks.

7,384 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
27 Aug 2001
TL;DR: The concept of a Content-Addressable Network (CAN) as a distributed infrastructure that provides hash table-like functionality on Internet-like scales is introduced and its scalability, robustness and low-latency properties are demonstrated through simulation.
Abstract: Hash tables - which map "keys" onto "values" - are an essential building block in modern software systems. We believe a similar functionality would be equally valuable to large distributed systems. In this paper, we introduce the concept of a Content-Addressable Network (CAN) as a distributed infrastructure that provides hash table-like functionality on Internet-like scales. The CAN is scalable, fault-tolerant and completely self-organizing, and we demonstrate its scalability, robustness and low-latency properties through simulation.

6,703 citations