scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Lorinda A. Hart

Other affiliations: University of Namibia
Bio: Lorinda A. Hart is an academic researcher from University of KwaZulu-Natal. The author has contributed to research in topics: Frugivore & Introduced species. The author has an hindex of 8, co-authored 19 publications receiving 158 citations. Previous affiliations of Lorinda A. Hart include University of Namibia.

Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
24 Mar 2014-PLOS ONE
TL;DR: iSimangaliso Wetland Park is identified as an important area for Odonata diversity and endemism, a trend also reflected by the DBI values.
Abstract: Maputaland–Pondoland–Albany, South Africa has been identified as a biodiversity hotspot and centre for endemism. Odonata make good indicators of freshwater ecosystem health. Consequently we compiled a list of Odonata species recorded to date in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park. We then detailed important species in terms of endemism, conservation status, and potential as indicator species. Finally, we compared Odonata assemblages of different sites sampled within the park to illustrate habitat importance. Species identified during two formal surveys and incidental observations made during the study period were combined with an existing database to compile an accurate and up to date species list for the iSimangaliso Wetland Park. Data from this study were then analyzed to determine which water bodies had the most similar species composition. The Dragonfly Biotic Index (DBI) value of each study area was also determined. We recorded 68 odonate species in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, adding 13 species to the Ezemvelo KwaZulu-Natal Wildlife database for the area. This brings the total number of Odonata species for the iSimangaliso Wetland Park to 86. Eight species are red-listed, 12 are restricted in South Africa to the coastal plains of northern KwaZulu-Natal, and the remainder occurs widely across the southern African savanna. Analyses indicate that species odonate assemblages were most similar in water bodies with comparable habitats. iSimangaliso Wetland Park is identified as an important area for Odonata diversity and endemism, a trend also reflected by the DBI values. Shifts in the existing species assemblages would indicate changes within the ecosystem and thus this species account provides necessary baseline data for the area. Species Conservation efforts should thus target water bodies of varying habitat types to protect greater species diversity.

32 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results suggest that Knysna and purple-crested turacos are legitimate seed dispersers of fleshy-fruited invasive plants, while rose-ringed parakeets are mainly seed predators.
Abstract: Avian frugivores play a key role in seed dispersal of many plant species, including invasive alien plants. We assessed the effect of gut passage on the germination of selected invasive alien plant species in South Africa. Fruits of four fleshly-fruited invasive alien plant species: Solanum mauritianum, Cinnamomum camphora, Psidium guajava, and Morus alba, were fed to two species of indigenous turacos, Knysna (Tauraco corythaix) and purple-crested (Gallirex porphyreolophus) turacos, and to invasive rose-ringed parakeets (Psittacula krameri). Seed retention time was determined as this can influence both seed dispersal and germination success. Germination success of ingested seeds was compared with that of manually de-pulped seeds, as well as to seeds in whole fruit. The germination success of seeds of all the invasive plant species increased significantly after ingestion by both turaco species compared with seeds from whole fruits. Germination success of manually de-pulped seeds did not differ significantly from that of turaco ingested seeds. In contrast, seed passage through the digestive tract of rose-ringed parakeets significantly reduced germination success and viability of ingested invasive plant species. Our results suggest that Knysna and purple-crested turacos are legitimate seed dispersers of fleshy-fruited invasive plants, while rose-ringed parakeets are mainly seed predators. Although seed predation by rose-ringed parakeets negatively affects the reproductive success of these plants, it is unlikely that this will suppress the spread of these invasive alien plants in South Africa as they are already well established. Furthermore, they can facilitate dispersal by seed regurgitation and dropping uneaten fruits away from the parent plant. Similar trends could be expected for indigenous seeds that rose-ringed parakeets feed on and therefore these birds remain a negative influence within invaded ecosystems.

28 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
23 Dec 2014-Ostrich
TL;DR: A summary of 15 years of census data is presented in this article, with the exception of 2009, less than 1 600 Cape Parrots were recorded in the wild, although this may be largely explained by an increase in coverage of suitable habitat and stabilisation in the population since 2005.
Abstract: The Cape Parrot Poicephalus robustus is endemic to South Africa and numbers have reportedly declined since the early 1900s. It is a forest specialist and food nomadic, moving between patches depending on fruit availability. This makes it difficult to estimate numbers accurately and to determine its distribution. The annual Cape Parrot Big Birding Day was initiated in 1998 as a national census to determine a population estimate. Volunteers assist in monitoring and counting the Cape Parrot in the Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal and Limpopo provinces in indigenous forests as well as sites where the parrots are known to feed outside of forests. Here, a summary of 15 years of census data is presented. In all years, with the exception of 2009, less than 1 600 Cape Parrots were recorded in the wild. The census data showed a slight increase in Cape Parrots, although this may be largely explained by an increase in coverage of suitable habitat and stabilisation in the population since 2005. A current distribution map f...

23 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Investigating the fruiting phenology of four forest fragments in the Ngele Mistbelt Forest complex, which forms part of the Eastern Mistbelt Forests in KwaZulu-Natal, using fruit-fall traps found variable and unpredictable fruiting between fragments.

20 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Examination of the effects of seasonal changes in ambient temperatures of captive-bred rose-ringed parakeets suggests that this species is physiologically and behaviorally equipped to cope with a range of climatic situations and this partly explains their global success as an invader species.

19 citations


Cited by
More filters
Book
01 Jan 1965

445 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Previous evidence for the importance of hornbills, bulbuls, elephants, gibbons, civets, and fruit bats in seed dispersal is reinforced, and it is suggested that the roles of green pigeons, macaques, rodents, bears, and deer were previously underestimated.

145 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is suggested that metabarcode is slowly becoming as cheap, fast and easy as conventional DNA barcoding, and that Malaise trap metabarcoding may soon fulfill its potential, providing a thermometer for biodiversity.
Abstract: Metabarcoding, the coupling of DNA-based species identification and high-throughput sequencing, offers enormous promise for arthropod biodiversity studies but factors such as cost, speed and ease-of-use of bioinformatic pipelines, crucial for making the leapt from demonstration studies to a real-world application, have not yet been adequately addressed. Here, four published and one newly designed primer sets were tested across a diverse set of 80 arthropod species, representing 11 orders, to establish optimal protocols for Illumina-based metabarcoding of tropical Malaise trap samples. Two primer sets which showed the highest amplification success with individual specimen polymerase chain reaction (PCR, 98%) were used for bulk PCR and Illumina MiSeq sequencing. The sequencing outputs were subjected to both manual and simple metagenomics quality control and filtering pipelines. We obtained acceptable detection rates after bulk PCR and high-throughput sequencing (80-90% of input species) but analyses were complicated by putative heteroplasmic sequences and contamination. The manual pipeline produced similar or better outputs to the simple metagenomics pipeline (1.4 compared with 0.5 expected:unexpected Operational Taxonomic Units). Our study suggests that metabarcoding is slowly becoming as cheap, fast and easy as conventional DNA barcoding, and that Malaise trap metabarcoding may soon fulfill its potential, providing a thermometer for biodiversity.

145 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The initial studies to ‘go wild’ have revealed a wealth of interindividual variation in sleep, and shown that sleep duration is not even fixed within an individual, but instead varies in response to an assortment of ecological demands.
Abstract: Despite being a prominent aspect of animal life, sleep and its functions remain poorly understood. As with any biological process, the functions of sleep can only be fully understood when examined in the ecological context in which they evolved. Owing to technological constraints, until recently, sleep has primarily been examined in the artificial laboratory environment. However, new tools are enabling researchers to study sleep behaviour and neurophysiology in the wild. Here, we summarize the various methods that have enabled sleep researchers to go wild, their strengths and weaknesses, and the discoveries resulting from these first steps outside the laboratory. The initial studies to 'go wild' have revealed a wealth of interindividual variation in sleep, and shown that sleep duration is not even fixed within an individual, but instead varies in response to an assortment of ecological demands. Determining the costs and benefits of this inter- and intraindividual variation in sleep may reveal clues to the functions of sleep. Perhaps the greatest surprise from these initial studies is that the reduction in neurobehavioural performance resulting from sleep loss demonstrated in the laboratory is not an obligatory outcome of reduced sleep in the wild.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wild clocks: integrating chronobiology and ecology to understand timekeeping in free-living animals'.

113 citations

01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors compared the fruit fates of C. orbiculatus and native American holly (Ilex opaca) and examined the influence of seed treatment and light intensity on seed germination and seed growth.
Abstract: Oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus Thunb.) is a non-indigenous, invasive woody vine in North America that proliferates in disturbed open sites. Unlike most invasive species, C. orbiculatus exhibits a ‘sit and wait’ strategy by establishing and persisting indefinitely in undisturbed, closed canopy forest and responding to canopy disturbance with rapid growth, often overtopping trees. We compared fruit fates of C. orbiculatus and native American holly (Ilex opaca). We also explored mechanisms for this ‘sit and wait’ invasion strategy by testing the effect of C. orbiculatus fruit crop density on removal rates and by examining the influence of seed treatment and light intensity on seed germination and seedling growth. More C. orbiculatus than I. opaca fruits became damaged, and damage occurred earlier. More fruit fell from C. orbiculatus than I. opaca, but removal rates by frugivores did not differ (76.0 ± 4.2% vs 87.5 ± 3.7%, respectively). Density (number of fruits in a patch) of C. orbiculatus did not influence removal rates. Scarification (bird-ingestion) of C. orbiculatus seed delayed germination but seeds germinated in similar proportion to manually defleshed seeds (sown either singly or all seeds from a fruit). Germination of seeds within intact fruits was inhibited and delayed compared to other treatments. Seed treatment did not affect seedling growth. The proportion of seeds germinating and time until germination was similar among five light intensity levels, ranging from full sun to closed-canopy. Seedlings in >70% photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) had more leaves, heavier shoots, and longer, heavier roots than seedlings at lower PAR levels. Results show that most (>75%) C. orbiculatus seeds are dispersed, seedlings can establish in dense shade, and plants grow rapidly when exposed to high light conditions. Control strategies for this highly invasive species should likely focus on minimizing seed dispersal by vertebrates.

90 citations