scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Luce Irigaray

Bio: Luce Irigaray is an academic researcher from Centre national de la recherche scientifique. The author has contributed to research in topics: Object (philosophy) & Democracy. The author has an hindex of 35, co-authored 99 publications receiving 9288 citations.


Papers
More filters
Book
01 Jan 1985
TL;DR: The Looking Glass, from the Other Side 2. This Sex Which Is Not One 3. Psychoanalytic Theory: Another Look 4. The Power of Discourse and the Subordination of the Feminine 5. Cosi Fan Tutti 6. The "Mechanics of Fluids 7. Questions 8. Women on the Market 9. Commodities among Themselves 10. "Frenchwomen," Stop Trying 11. When Our Lips Speak Together Publisher's Note and Notes on Selected Terms
Abstract: 1. The Looking Glass, from the Other Side 2. This Sex Which Is Not One 3. Psychoanalytic Theory: Another Look 4. The Power of Discourse and the Subordination of the Feminine 5. Cosi Fan Tutti 6. The "Mechanics" of Fluids 7. Questions 8. Women on the Market 9. Commodities among Themselves 10. "Frenchwomen," Stop Trying 11. When Our Lips Speak Together Publisher's Note and Notes on Selected Terms

2,591 citations

Book
01 Jan 1985
TL;DR: A woman is a woman as a result of a certain lack of characteristics" as discussed by the authors, and women are women because of their inability to conform to society's view of women.
Abstract: THE BLIND SPOT OF AN OLD DREAM OF SYMMETRYWoman, Science's Unknown How Can They Immediately Be So Sure? The Anatomical Model A Science That Still Cannot Make Up Its Mind A Question of Method What Is Involved in (Re) production, and How It Aids and Abets the Phallic Order A Difference Not Taken into Account The Labor "to Become a Woman"The Little Girl Is (Only) a Little Boy An Inferior Little Man The Cards Turned Over The Dream Interpreters Themselves Penis Masturbation: A Necessarily Phallic Auto-eroticism The Change of "Object" or the Crisis of a Devaluation The Law of the Self-sameIs Her End in Her Beginning? An Unsuspected Love The Desire to Have a Child by the Mother The Father's Seduction: Law but Not Sex The "Reasons" Why a Girl Hates Her Mother and a Boy Goes on Loving His An Economy of Primal Desire That Cannot Be Represented One More ChildAnother "Cause"-Castration As Might Be Expected The Gaze, Always at Stake Anatomy Is "Destiny" What the Father's Discourse Covers Up The Negative in Phallocentric Dialectic Is Working Out the Death Drives Limited to Men Only?"Penis-Envy" Waiting in Vain An Indirect Sublimation "Envy" or "Desire" for the Penis? Repression, or Inexorable Censorship? Mimesis ImposedA Painful Way to Become a Woman And the Father, Neutral and Benevolent, Washes His Hands of the Matter A (Female) A-Sex? Is the Oedipus Complex Universal or Not? Free Association on OnanismA Very Black Sexuality? Symptoms Almost Like Those of Melancholia A Setback She Cannot Mourn That Open Wound That Draws Everything to Itself That Necessary Remainder: HysteriaThe Penis = the Father's Child The Primacy of Anal Erotism Those Party to a Certain Lease Woman Island Also Mother Forbidden Games The Hymen of Oedipus, Father and SonThe Deferred Action of Castration Capitalism without Complexes The Metaphorical Veil of the Eternal Feminine The Other Side of History The Submission of a Slave? A Super-ego That Rather Despises the Female SexAn Indispensable Wave of Passivity A Redistribution of Partial Instincts, Especially Sadistic-anal Instincts "There Is Only One Libido" Idealization, What Is One's Own The (Re)productive Organ Confirmation of FrigidityFemale Hom(m)osexuality The "Constitutional Factor" Is Decisive Homosexual Choice Clearly Expounded A Cure Fails for Lack of Transference(s) Female SamenessAn Impracticable Sexual Relationship An Ideal Love Were It Not for Her Mother? Or Her Mother-in-law? Squaring the Family Circle Generation Gap, or Being Historically out of Phase? Woman's Enigmatic Bisexuality"Woman Is a Woman as a Result of a Certain Lack of Characteristics" An Ex-orbitant Narcissism The Vanity of a Commodity The Shame That Demands Vicious Conformity Women Have Never Invented Anything but Weaving A Very Envious Nature Society Holds No Interest for Women A Fault in Sublimation "La Femme de Trente Ans"SPECULUM Any Theory of the "Subject" Has Always Been Appropriated by the "Masculine" Kore: Young Virgin, Pupil of the Eye On the Index of Plato's Works: Woman How to Conceive (of) a Girl Une Mere de Glace " and if, taking the eye of a man recently dead " La Mysterique Paradox A Priori The Eternal Irony of the Community Volume-FluidityPLATO'S HysteriaThe Stage Setup Turned Upside-down and Back-to-front Special Status for the Side Opposite A Fire in the Image of a Sun The Forgotten Path Paraphragm/Diaphragm The Magic Show A Waste of Time? A Specular CaveThe Dialogues One Speaks, the Others Are Silent Like Ourselves, They Submit to a Like Principle of Identity Provided They Have a Head, Turned in the Right Direction What Is = What They See, and Vice Versa The A-letheia, a Necessary Denegation among Men Even Her Voice Is Taken Away from Echo A Double Topographic Error, Its ConsequencesThe Avoidance of (Masculine) Hysteria A Hypnotic Method That Buries and Forbids "Madness" A Remainder of Aphasia The Misprison of Difference The Unreflected Dazzle of SeductionThe "Way Out" of the Cave The "Passage" A Difficult Delivery Then Whence and How Does He Get Out? A World Peopled by GhostsThe Time Needed to Focus and Adjust the Vision Impossible to Turn Back (or Over) Were It Not, Right Now, for a Sophistry Played with Doubles A Frozen Nature The Auto Taken in by the A-letheia Bastard or Legitimate Offspring?The Father's Vision: Engendering with No History of Problems A Hymen of Glass/Ice The Unbegotten Begetter Exorcism of the Dark Night Astrology as Thaumaturgy: A Semblance (of a) Sun A Question of PropertyA Form That Is Always the Same The Passage Confusing Big and Little, and Vice Versa The Standard Itself/Himself Better to Revolve upon Oneself-But This Is Possible Only for God-the-Father The Mother, Happily, Does Not Remember A Source-mirror of All That Is The Analysis of That Projection Will Never Take (or Have Taken) PlaceCompletion of the Paideia The Failings of an Organ That Is Still Too Sensible A Seminar in Good Working Order An Immaculate Conception The Deferred Action of an Ideal Jouissance The End of ChildhoodLife in Philosophy Always the Same (He) An Autistic Completeness Love Turned Away from Inferior Species and Genera/Gender The Privilege of the Immortals The Science of Desire A Kore Dilated to the Whole Field of the Gaze and Mirroring HerselfDivine Knowledge The Back Reserved for God The Divine Mystery This Power Cannot Be Imitated by Mortals How, Then, Can They Evaluate Their Potency? Except over Someone Like Themselves? The Father Knows the Front Side and Back Side of Everything, at Least in Theory The Meaning of Death for a PhilosopherAn Unarticulated/Inarticulate Go-Between: The Split between Sensible and Intelligible A Failure of Relations between the Father and Mother A One-way Passage Compulsory Participation in the Attributes of the Type A Misprized Incest and an Unrealizable IncestReturn to the Name of the Father The Impossible Regression toward the Mother A Competition the Philosopher Will Decline to Enter Two Modes of Repetition: Property and Proximity Better to Work the Earth on the Father's Account Than to Return to It: Metaphor/Metonymy The Threat of Castration"Woman's" Jouissance A Dead Cave Which Puts Representation Back into Play That Marvelously Solitary Pleasure of God A Diagonal Helps to Temper the Excessiveness of the One The Infinite of an Ideal Which Covers the Slit (of a) Void Losing Sight of "the Other" The Vengeance of Children Freed from Their Chains

1,567 citations

Book
01 Jan 1993
TL;DR: In An Ethics of Sexual Difference as discussed by the authors, Irigaray argues that all thought and language is gendered and that there can therefore be no neutral thought. But this is not the strongest feminist reading in the history of philosophy that I know.
Abstract: Luce Irigaray offers the strongest feminist reading in the history of philosophy that I know' Judith Butler Luce Irigaray (1932-) is the foremost thinker on sexual difference of our times. She trained as an analyst with the Lacanian Freudian School of Paris and is a prolific and influential author, whose work ranges over philosophy, psychoanalysis, linguistics and social critique. Since the publication of This Sex Which is Not One she has developed her theory that there are significant differences between the language spoken by men and that spoken by women. In An Ethics of Sexual Difference Irigaray speaks out against many feminists by pursuing questions of sexual difference, arguing that all thought and language is gendered and that there can therefore be no neutral thought. Examining major philosophers, such as Plato, Spinoza and Levinas, with a series of meditations on the female experience, she advocates new philosophies through which women can develop a distinctly female space and a "love of self." It is an essential feminist text and a major contribution to our thinking about language. Translated by Carolyn Burke and Gillian C. Gill>

941 citations

Book
01 Jan 1991
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the power of discourse and the subordination of the feminine, and the necessity for sexuate rights in the context of women-mothers, the silent substratum of the social order.
Abstract: Acknowledgements. Introduction. Glossary. Section I: The critique of Patriarchy. Introduction to Section I. 1. Equal or different. 2. The bodily encounter wit the mother. 3. Women-mothers, the silent substratum of the social order. 4. Volume without contours. Section II: Psychoanalysis and language. Introduction to section II. 5. The poverty of psychoanalysis. 6. the limit of the transference. 7. The power of discourse and the subordination of the feminine. 8. Questions. 9. The three genres. Section III: Ethics and subjectivity: towards the future. Introduction to Section III. 10. Sexual difference. 11. Questions to Emmanuel Levinas. 12. Women-amongst-themselves: creating a woman-woman sociality. 13. The necessity for sexuate rights. 14. How to define sexuate rights? 15. He risks who risks life itself. Bibliography. Index.

276 citations

Book
01 Jan 1974

275 citations


Cited by
More filters
Book
01 Jan 1990
TL;DR: The body politics of Julia Kristeva and the Body Politics of JuliaKristeva as mentioned in this paper are discussed in detail in Section 5.1.1 and Section 6.2.1.
Abstract: Preface (1999) Preface (1990) 1. Subjects of Sex/Gender/Desire I. 'Women' as the Subject of Feminism II. The Compulsory Order of Sex/Gender/Desire III. Gender: The Circular Ruins of Contemporary Debate IV. Theorizing the Binary, the Unitary and Beyond V. Identity, Sex and the Metaphysics of Substance VI. Language, Power and the Strategies of Displacement 2. Prohibition, Psychoanalysis, and the Production of the Heterosexual Matrix I. Structuralism's Critical Exchange II. Lacan, Riviere, and the Strategies of Masquerade III. Freud and the Melancholia of Gender IV. Gender Complexity and the Limits of Identification V. Reformulating Prohibition as Power 3. Subversive Bodily Acts I. The Body Politics of Julia Kristeva II. Foucault, Herculine, and the Politics of Sexual Discontinuity III. Monique Wittig - Bodily Disintegration and Fictive Sex IV. Bodily Inscriptions, Performative Subversions Conclusion - From Parody to Politics

21,123 citations

Book
01 Jan 1988
TL;DR: In this paper, the Third World Woman is presented as a singular monolithic subject in some recent (western) feminist texts, focusing on a certain mode of appropriation and codification of "scholarship" and knowledge about women in the third world by particular analytic categories employed in writings on the subject which take as their primary point of reference feminist interests as they have been articulated in the US and western Europe.
Abstract: It ought to be of some political significance at least that the term 'colonization' has come to denote a variety of phenomena in recent feminist and left writings in general. From its analytic value as a category of exploitative economic exchange in both traditional and contemporary Marxisms (cf. particularly such contemporary scholars as Baran, Amin and Gunder-Frank) to its use by feminist women of colour in the US, to describe the appropriation of their experiences and struggles by hegemonic white women's movements,' the term 'colonization' has been used to characterize everything from the most evident economic and political hierarchies to the production of a particular cultural discourse about what is called the 'Third World.'2 However sophisticated or problematical its use as an explanatory construct, colonization almost invariably implies a relation of structural domination, and a discursive or political suppression of the heterogeneity of the subject(s) in question. What I wish to analyse here specifically is the production of the 'Third World Woman' as a singular monolithic subject in some recent (western) feminist texts. The definition of colonization I invoke is a predominantly discursive one, focusing on a certain mode of appropriation and codification of 'scholarship' and 'knowledge' about women in the third world by particular analytic categories employed in writings on the subject which take as their primary point of reference feminist interests as they have been articulated in the US and western Europe. My concern about such writings derives from my own implication and investment in contemporary debates in feminist theory, and the urgent political necessity of forming strategic coalitions across class, race and national boundaries. Clearly, western feminist discourse and political practice is neither singular nor homogeneous in its goals, interests or analyses. However, it is possible to trace a coherence of

4,287 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors attend to snowball sampling via constructivist and feminist hermeneutics, suggesting that when viewed critically, this popular sampling method can generate a unique type of social knowledge which is emergent, political and interactional.
Abstract: During the past two decades we have witnessed a rather impressive growth of theoretical innovations and conceptual revisions of epistemological and methodological approaches within constructivist‐qualitative quarters of the social sciences. Methodological discussions have commonly addressed a variety of methods for collecting and analyzing empirical material, yet the critical grounds upon which these were reformulated have rarely been extended to embrace sampling concepts and procedures. The latter have been overlooked, qualifying only as a ‘technical’ research stage. This article attends to snowball sampling via constructivist and feminist hermeneutics, suggesting that when viewed critically, this popular sampling method can generate a unique type of social knowledge—knowledge which is emergent, political and interactional. The article reflects upon researches about backpacker tourists and marginalized men, where snowball sampling was successfully employed in investigating these groups' organic social ne...

2,208 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In Complexity and Postmodernism as mentioned in this paper, Cilliers explores the idea of complexity in the light of contemporary perspectives from philosophy and science, and offers us a unique approach to understand complexity and computational theory by integrating postmodern theory (like that of Derrida and Lyotard) into his discussion.
Abstract: In Complexity and Postmodernism, Paul Cilliers explores the idea of complexity in the light of contemporary perspectives from philosophy and science. Cilliers offers us a unique approach to understanding complexity and computational theory by integrating postmodern theory (like that of Derrida and Lyotard) into his discussion. Complexity and Postmodernism is an exciting and an original book that should be read by anyone interested in gaining a fresh understanding of complexity, postmodernism and connectionism.

1,683 citations

Book
Judith Lorber1
01 Jan 1994
TL;DR: Lorber as discussed by the authors argues that gender is a product of socialization, subject to human agency, organization, and interpretation, and that it is a social institution comparable to the economy, the family, and religion in its significance and consequences.
Abstract: In this innovative book, a well-known feminist and sociologist-who is also the founding editor of Gender & Society-challenges our most basic assumptions about gender. Judith Lorber argues that gender is wholly a product of socialization, subject to human agency, organization, and interpretation, and that it is a social institution comparable to the economy, the family, and religion in its significance and consequences. Calling into question the inevitability and necessity of gender, she envisions a society structured for equality, where no gender, racial ethnic, or social class group is allowed to monopolize positions of power.

1,642 citations