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Lucinda Austin

Bio: Lucinda Austin is an academic researcher from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The author has contributed to research in topics: Crisis communication & Social media. The author has an hindex of 15, co-authored 39 publications receiving 1370 citations. Previous affiliations of Lucinda Austin include University of Maryland, College Park & Elon University.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper explored how audiences seek information from social and traditional media, and what factors affect media use during crises using the social-mediated crisis communication (SMCC) model, an examination of crisis information and sources reveals that audiences use social media during crises for insider information and checking in with family/friends and use traditional media for educational purposes.
Abstract: This study explores how audiences seek information from social and traditional media, and what factors affect media use during crises. Using the social-mediated crisis communication (SMCC) model, an examination of crisis information and sources reveals that audiences use social media during crises for insider information and checking in with family/friends and use traditional media for educational purposes. Convenience, involvement, and personal recommendations encourage social and traditional media use; information overload discourages use of both. Humor and attitudes about the purpose of social media discourage use of social media, while credibility encourages traditional media use. Practically, findings stressed the importance of third-party influence in crisis communication and the need for using both traditional and social media in crisis response.

434 citations

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TL;DR: The findings indicate the key role of crisis origin in affecting publics’ preferred information form and source influences how publics anticipate an organization should respond to a crisis and what crisis emotions they are likely to feel when exposed to crisis information.
Abstract: Publics increasingly use social media during crises and, consequently, crisis communication professionals need to understand how to strategically optimize these tools. Despite this need, there is scarce theory-grounded research to understand key factors that affect how publics consume crisis information via social media compared to other sources. To fill this gap, an emerging model helps crisis managers understand how publics produce, consume, and/or share crisis information via social media and other sources: the social-mediated crisis communication model (SMCC). This study tests essential components of the SMCC model through a 3 (crisis information form) x 2 (crisis information source) x 2 (crisis origin) mixed-design experiment (N = 338). The findings indicate the key role of crisis origin in affecting publics’ preferred information form (social media, traditional media, or word-of-mouth communication) and source (organization in crisis or third party), which influences how publics anticipate an organi...

366 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors evaluated the effect of crisis information form and source on publics' acceptance of crisis response strategies and publics's crisis emotions, and found that crisis information forms and sources affect publics attribution independent and dependent emotions.

304 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article applied the social mediated crisis communication (SMCC) model to understand why and how publics communicate about crises and found that the source and form of the initial crisis information publics are exposed to affect their crisis communication.
Abstract: Through 22 in-depth interviews and an experiment with 162 college students, this study applies the social-mediated crisis communication (SMCC) model to understand why and how publics communicate about crises. Specifically, the study focuses on how the source and form of the initial crisis information publics are exposed to affect their crisis communication. The findings confirm the validity of the SMCC model's core components related to publics' crisis communicative tendencies under the influence of traditional media, social media, and offline word-of-mouth communication. The results also indicate that traditional media, compared to other media forms, seems to exert a stronger influence on how publics communicate about crises.

97 citations

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TL;DR: In this article, the authors developed a scale for measuring publics' crisis emotions and found that three types of emotions are likely to be felt by publics when exposed to organizational crises: (1) attribution-independent (AI) crisis emotions, (2) external-attribution-dependent (EAD ) crisis emotions; and (3) IAD crisis emotions.

74 citations


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01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: The using multivariate statistics is universally compatible with any devices to read, allowing you to get the most less latency time to download any of the authors' books like this one.
Abstract: Thank you for downloading using multivariate statistics. As you may know, people have look hundreds times for their favorite novels like this using multivariate statistics, but end up in infectious downloads. Rather than reading a good book with a cup of tea in the afternoon, instead they juggled with some harmful bugs inside their laptop. using multivariate statistics is available in our digital library an online access to it is set as public so you can download it instantly. Our books collection saves in multiple locations, allowing you to get the most less latency time to download any of our books like this one. Merely said, the using multivariate statistics is universally compatible with any devices to read.

14,604 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

3,628 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A comprehensive review of online, official, and scientific literature was carried out in 2012-13 to develop a framework of disaster social media, illustrating that a variety of entities may utilise and produce disaster social social media content.
Abstract: A comprehensive review of online, official, and scientific literature was carried out in 2012-13 to develop a framework of disaster social media. This framework can be used to facilitate the creation of disaster social media tools, the formulation of disaster social media implementation processes, and the scientific study of disaster social media effects. Disaster social media users in the framework include communities, government, individuals, organisations, and media outlets. Fifteen distinct disaster social media uses were identified, ranging from preparing and receiving disaster preparedness information and warnings and signalling and detecting disasters prior to an event to (re)connecting community members following a disaster. The framework illustrates that a variety of entities may utilise and produce disaster social media content. Consequently, disaster social media use can be conceptualised as occurring at a number of levels, even within the same disaster. Suggestions are provided on how the proposed framework can inform future disaster social media development and research.

588 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors compared the effects of medium (Facebook vs. Twitter vs. online newspaper) and crisis type (intentional vs. victim) in an online experiment using the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster as crisis scenario.

424 citations