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Author

Luisa Veronis

Other affiliations: University of Toronto
Bio: Luisa Veronis is an academic researcher from University of Ottawa. The author has contributed to research in topics: Refugee & Immigration. The author has an hindex of 11, co-authored 41 publications receiving 450 citations. Previous affiliations of Luisa Veronis include University of Toronto.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An exploratory framework is proposed to take into account the role of context in shaping environmental migration across borders, including the dynamic and complex interactions between environmental and non-environmental factors at a range of scales.
Abstract: This paper presents the findings of a systematic review of scholarly publications that report empirical findings from studies of environmentally-related international migration. There exists a small, but growing accumulation of empirical studies that consider environmentally-linked migration that spans international borders. These studies provide useful evidence for scholars and policymakers in understanding how environmental factors interact with political, economic and social factors to influence migration behavior and outcomes that are specific to international movements of people, in highlighting promising future research directions, and in raising important considerations for international policymaking. Our review identifies countries of migrant origin and destination that have so far been the subject of empirical research, the environmental factors believed to have influenced these migrations, the interactions of environmental and non-environmental factors as well as the role of context in influencing migration behavior, and the types of methods used by researchers. In reporting our findings, we identify the strengths and challenges associated with the main empirical approaches, highlight significant gaps and future opportunities for empirical work, and contribute to advancing understanding of environmental influences on international migration more generally. Specifically, we propose an exploratory framework to take into account the role of context in shaping environmental migration across borders, including the dynamic and complex interactions between environmental and non-environmental factors at a range of scales.

114 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The case of Latin Americans' struggle for belonging in Toronto serves to reflect on how and why new immigrant groups today (re)construct collective identity spatially as discussed by the authors, arguing that immigrants strategically essentialize their identities in and through place in order to make themselves visible and their voices heard.
Abstract: This paper contributes to debates on the empirical and conceptual potentials of anti-essentializing notions such as ‘thirdspace’ with the aim to open new epistemological and political grounds. Based on the findings of ethnographic research, I critically examine two spatial strategies (the deliberate creation of an ethnic neighbourhood, and the securing of a community centre) that Latin American immigrants in Toronto, Canada, developed to appropriate urban space and lay claims to equal rights. The case of Latin Americans' struggle for belonging in Toronto serves to reflect on how and why new immigrant groups today (re)construct collective identity spatially. I argue that immigrants strategically essentialize their identities in and through place in order to make themselves visible and their voices heard. Ethnic places represent sites of resistance and creation where immigrants construct their own subjectivities while also redefining dominant notions of inclusion and citizenship. Although locally grounded, ...

59 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper explored immigrants' notions and practices of citizenship, and how these contribute to the citizenship debate in Latin American immigrants' struggle, and examined Latin Americans' struggle for self-identity.
Abstract: In this paper I explore immigrants' notions and practices of citizenship, and how these contribute to the citizenship debate In order to achieve this, I examine Latin American immigrants' struggle

53 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that nonprofit, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) constitute crucial sites at which welfare state restructuring and neoliberalism are enacted and materialised in everyday life practices, and they draw on the concept of "translation" to show the agency of NGOs in articulating macro-scale programmes of governance into concrete regulations that govern the conduct of everyday life.
Abstract: In this paper we argue that nonprofit, nongovernmental organisations (NGOs) constitute crucial sites at which welfare state restructuring and neoliberalism are enacted and materialised in everyday life practices. This paper responds to recent calls from geographers to move to finer scales of analysis that enrich our understanding about the geographies of welfare state restructuring and neoliberalism. Our response is based on case-study research of NGOs that provide social services to migrants in Minneapolis-St Paul, USA, and Toronto, Canada. We draw on the concept of ‘translation’ to show the agency of NGOs in articulating macroscale programmes of governance into concrete regulations that govern the conduct of everyday life. The case studies demonstrate the usefulness of seeing NGOs as translation mechanisms to current debates about the role of NGOs amidst welfare state restructuring and the rise of neoliberalism.

39 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examined the challenges that migrants face to participate and build community in host societies today, focusing on immigrants' collective forms of organizing, and drawing on transnationalism research to avoid the use of essentializing categories in the study of immigrant groups that are internally diverse.
Abstract: This paper examines the challenges migrant groups that are new and internally diverse face to participate and build community in host societies today. Qualitative research findings on Latin American migrants' experiences in Toronto, Canada, reveal that the group's participation is the result of a complexity of social and spatial processes. The paper contributes to current debates on the study of immigrant integration in three ways: (1) by focusing on immigrants' collective forms of organising, (2) by responding to ongoing calls for a closer examination of intra-group diversity, and (3) by drawing on transnationalism research to avoid the use of essentialising categories in the study of immigrant groups that are internally diverse.

38 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, Imagined communities: Reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism are discussed. And the history of European ideas: Vol. 21, No. 5, pp. 721-722.

13,842 citations

Book Chapter
01 Jan 1996
TL;DR: In this article, Jacobi describes the production of space poetry in the form of a poetry collection, called Imagine, Space Poetry, Copenhagen, 1996, unpaginated and unedited.
Abstract: ‘The Production of Space’, in: Frans Jacobi, Imagine, Space Poetry, Copenhagen, 1996, unpaginated.

7,238 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Flexible Citizenship: The Cultural Logics of Transnationality by Aihwa Ong as discussed by the authors is a seminal work in the field of transnationality. ix. 322 pp., notes, bibliography, index.
Abstract: Flexible Citizenship: The Cultural Logics of Transnationality. Aihwa Ong. Durham, NIC: Duke University Press, 1999. ix. 322 pp., notes, bibliography, index.

1,517 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is argued that belonging should be analyzed both as a personal, intimate, feeling of being ‘at home’ in a place (place-belongingness) and as a discursive resource that constructs, claims, justifies, or resists forms of socio-spatial inclusion/exclusion (politics of belonging).
Abstract: Belonging is a notion both vaguely defined and ill-theorized. Scholars in various social disciplines often take this notion for granted, as if its meaning is somewhat self-explanatory. Others tend to equate it with the notion of identity, citizenship, or both. By relying on a critical reading of an extensive literature across academic disciplines, this study aims to offer an analytical framework for the study of belonging. I argue that belonging should be analyzed both as a personal, intimate, feeling of being ‘at home’ in a place (place-belongingness) and as a discursive resource that constructs, claims, justifies, or resists forms of socio-spatial inclusion/exclusion (politics of belonging). The risk of focusing only on one of these two dimensions is to fall in the trap of either a socially de-contextualized individualism or an all-encompassing social(izing) discourse. The open question is whether the increasing cultural and ethnic diversification of contemporary societies can lead to the formation of communities of belonging beyond communities of identity.

578 citations