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Author

Lyn Robinson

Bio: Lyn Robinson is an academic researcher from City University London. The author has contributed to research in topics: Information science & Information literacy. The author has an hindex of 20, co-authored 126 publications receiving 2304 citations. Previous affiliations of Lyn Robinson include University of London & University College London.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The article considers the changing contexts of information communication, with some caveats about the identification of `pathologies of information', and analyses the changes over time in the way in which issues of the quantity and quality of information available have been regarded.
Abstract: This review article identifies and discusses some of main issues and potential problems - paradoxes and pathologies - around the communication of recorded information, and points to some possible solutions. The article considers the changing contexts of information communication, with some caveats about the identification of `pathologies of information', and analyses the changes over time in the way in which issues of the quantity and quality of information available have been regarded. Two main classes of problems and issues are discussed. The first comprises issues relating to the quantity and diversity of information available: information overload, information anxiety, etc. The second comprises issues relating to the changing information environment with the advent of Web 2.0: loss of identity and authority, emphasis on micro-chunking and shallow novelty, and the impermanence of information. A final section proposes some means of solution of problems and of improvements to the situation.

947 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A new model is proposed that includes key elements of existing models and takes into account not just the information seeker but also the communicator, and will be of practical value both to information providers and to users.
Abstract: Purpose – This paper aims to gain insights from existing models of information behaviour, building on them to develop a new model which, unlike most others, encompasses both information seeking and communication. By identifying key factors affecting the successful communication and use of information, it is hoped that the model will be of practical value both to information providers and to users.Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on a literature search and analysis of well‐established models of information seeking and of communication, from which a new conceptual model is constructed.Findings – Existing models have elements in common, though most models in library and information science focus on information seeking and the information user, while those from the field of communications focus on the communicator and the communication process. A new model is proposed that includes key elements of existing models and takes into account not just the information seeker but also the communicator ...

157 citations

Book
30 Jun 2012
TL;DR: This talk discusses information science and 21st century information pratices: creatively engaging with information, and the future of the information sciences.
Abstract: Foreword 1. Information science and 21st century information pratices: creatively engaging with information - Theresa Dirndorfer Anderson Foreword 2. The emerging discipline of information - Andrew Dillon Foreword 3. The scope of information science - Jonathan Furner Foreword 4. A fascinating field and a pragmatic enterpirse - Birger Hjorland Foreword 5. A slippery and ubiquitous concept - Fidelia Ibekwe-SanJuan Foreword 6. The future of information science - Maja A umer 1. What is information science? Disciplines and professions 2. History of information: the story of documents 3. Philosophies and paradigms of information science 4. Basic concepts of information science 5. Domain analysis 6. Information organization 7. Information technologies: creation, dissemination and retrieval 8. Infometrics 9. Information behaviour 10. Communicating information: changing contexts 11. Information society 12. Information management and policy 13. Digital literacy 14. Information science research: what and how? 15. The future of the information sciences.

132 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A conceptual model is derived, based on the study of components of the information chain through approaches of domain analysis, plus “fringe” topics and a meta‐level consideration of the discipline itself.
Abstract: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to derive a conceptual model for information science, which is both academically sound and practically useful, particularly for curriculum design.Design/methodology/approach – The approach takes the form of a conceptual analysis, based on an extensive literature review, going back to the earliest days of information science.Findings – A conceptual model is derived, based on the study of components of the information chain through approaches of domain analysis, plus “fringe” topics and a meta‐level consideration of the discipline itself. Links to related subjects may be derived systematically from this model.Originality/value – This is the first paper to suggest that a useful model for information science can be derived, based on the idea of studying the communication chain by means of domain analysis.

75 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An empirical study of the information‐related behaviour of emerging artists and designers, both as practising artists (a little understood category of information users), and also as “new practitioners”.
Abstract: Purpose – This paper aims to report an empirical study of the information‐related behaviour of emerging artists and designers. It also aims to add to understanding of the information behaviour of the group both as practising artists (a little understood category of information users), and also as “new practitioners”.Design/methodology/approach – A literature analysis is used to guide creation of an online questionnaire, eliciting both qualitative and quantitative data. A total of 78 practising artists participated, all having graduated in the seven years prior to the survey.Findings – The group have generally the same information practices as more established artists. They place reliance on internet and social networks, while also using traditional printed tools and libraries. Browsing is important, but not a predominant means of accessing information. Inspiration is found from a very diverse and idiosyncratic set of sources, often by serendipitous means. Their status as emergent practitioners means that ...

66 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Barwise and Perry as discussed by the authors tackle the slippery subject of ''meaning, '' a subject that has long vexed linguists, language philosophers, and logicians, and they tackle it in this book.
Abstract: In this provocative book, Barwise and Perry tackle the slippery subject of \"meaning, \" a subject that has long vexed linguists, language philosophers, and logicians.

1,834 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

1,549 citations

Book
19 Apr 2012
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors introduce concepts relevant to Information Behavior Models, Paradigms, and Theories in the study of Information Behavior Methods for Studying Information Behavior Research Results and Reflections.
Abstract: Abbreviated Contents Figures and Tables Preface Introduction and Examples Concepts Relevant to Information Behavior Models, Paradigms, and Theories in the Study of Information Behavior Methods for Studying Information Behavior Research Results and Reflections Appendix: Glossary Appendix: Questions for Discussion and Application References Index

1,347 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
James H. Moor1

1,205 citations