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M. C. Schlamp

Bio: M. C. Schlamp is an academic researcher from University of California, Berkeley. The author has contributed to research in topics: Work function & Nanocrystal. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 2 publications receiving 6757 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
04 Aug 1994-Nature
TL;DR: In this article, a hybrid organic/inorganic electroluminescent device was constructed based on the recombination of holes injected into a layer of semiconducting p-paraphenylene vinylene (PPV) with electrons injected into the multilayer film of cadmium selenide nanocrystals.
Abstract: ELECTROLUMINESCENT devices have been developed recently that are based on new materials such as porous silicon1 and semiconducting polymers2,3. By taking advantage of developments in the preparation and characterization of direct-gap semiconductor nanocrystals4–6, and of electroluminescent polymers7, we have now constructed a hybrid organic/inorganic electroluminescent device. Light emission arises from the recombination of holes injected into a layer of semiconducting p-paraphenylene vinylene (PPV)8–10 with electrons injected into a multilayer film of cadmium selenide nanocrystals. Close matching of the emitting layer of nanocrystals with the work function of the metal contact leads to an operating voltage11 of only 4V. At low voltages emission from the CdSe layer occurs. Because of the quantum size effect19–24 the colour of this emission can be varied from red to yellow by changing the nanocrystal size. At higher voltages green emission from the polymer layer predominates. Thus this device has a degree of voltage tunability of colour.

3,783 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, a hybrid organic/inorganic electroluminescent device was constructed based on the recombination of holes injected into a layer of semiconducting p-paraphenylene vinylene (PPV) with electrons injected into the multilayer film of cadmium selenide nanocrystals.
Abstract: ELECTROLUMINESCENT devices have been developed recently that are based on new materials such as porous silicon' and semiconducting polymers 2,3 . By taking advantage of developments in the preparation and characterization of direct-gap semiconductor nanocrystals 4-6 , and of electroluminescent polymers7, we have now constructed a hybrid organic/inorganic electroluminescent device. Light emission arises from the recombination of holes injected into a layer of semiconducting p-paraphenylene vinylene (PPV) 2-10 with electrons injected into a multilayer film of cadmium selenide nanocrystals. Close matching of the emitting layer of nanocrystals with the work function of the metal contact leads to an operating voltage" of only 4 V. At low voltages emission from the CdSe layer occurs. Because of the quantum size effect 19-24 the colour of this emission can be varied from red to yellow by changing the nanocrystal size. At higher voltages green emission from the polymer layer predominates. Thus this device has a degree of voltage tunability of colour.

3,285 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
16 Feb 1996-Science
TL;DR: In this article, the authors focus on the properties of quantum dots and their ability to join the dots into complex assemblies creates many opportunities for scientific discovery, such as the ability of joining the dots to complex assemblies.
Abstract: Current research into semiconductor clusters is focused on the properties of quantum dots-fragments of semiconductor consisting of hundreds to many thousands of atoms-with the bulk bonding geometry and with surface states eliminated by enclosure in a material that has a larger band gap. Quantum dots exhibit strongly size-dependent optical and electrical properties. The ability to join the dots into complex assemblies creates many opportunities for scientific discovery.

10,737 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, solution phase syntheses and size-selective separation methods to prepare semiconductor and metal nanocrystals, tunable in size from ∼1 to 20 nm and monodisperse to ≤ 5%, are presented.
Abstract: ▪ Abstract Solution phase syntheses and size-selective separation methods to prepare semiconductor and metal nanocrystals, tunable in size from ∼1 to 20 nm and monodisperse to ≤5%, are presented. Preparation of monodisperse samples enables systematic characterization of the structural, electronic, and optical properties of materials as they evolve from molecular to bulk in the nanometer size range. Sample uniformity makes it possible to manipulate nanocrystals into close-packed, glassy, and ordered nanocrystal assemblies (superlattices, colloidal crystals, supercrystals). Rigorous structural characterization is critical to understanding the electronic and optical properties of both nanocrystals and their assemblies. At inter-particle separations 5–100 A, dipole-dipole interactions lead to energy transfer between neighboring nanocrystals, and electronic tunneling between proximal nanocrystals gives rise to dark and photoconductivity. At separations <5 A, exchange interactions cause otherwise insulating ass...

4,116 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Nanocrystals (NCs) discussed in this Review are tiny crystals of metals, semiconductors, and magnetic material consisting of hundreds to a few thousand atoms each that are among the hottest research topics of the last decades.
Abstract: Nanocrystals (NCs) discussed in this Review are tiny crystals of metals, semiconductors, and magnetic material consisting of hundreds to a few thousand atoms each. Their size ranges from 2-3 to about 20 nm. What is special about this size regime that placed NCs among the hottest research topics of the last decades? The quantum mechanical coupling * To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: dvtalapin@uchicago.edu. † The University of Chicago. ‡ Argonne National Lab. Chem. Rev. 2010, 110, 389–458 389

3,720 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the present status and new opportunities for research in this area of materials physical chemistry are reviewed, as well as a review of the present state and opportunities in this field.
Abstract: Semiconductor nanocrystals exhibit a wide range of size-dependent properties. Variations in fundamental characteristics ranging from phase transitions to electrical conductivity can be induced by controlling the size of the crystals. The present status and new opportunities for research in this area of materials physical chemistry are reviewed.

3,493 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
30 Nov 2001-Science
TL;DR: This light-driven process results in a colloid with distinctive optical properties that directly relate to the nanoprism shape of the particles, which could be useful in developing multicolor diagnostic labels on the basis of nanoparticle composition and size but also of shape.
Abstract: A photoinduced method for converting large quantities of silver nanospheres into triangular nanoprisms is reported. The photo-process has been characterized by time-dependent ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, allowing for the observation of several key intermediates in and characteristics of the conversion process. This light-driven process results in a colloid with distinctive optical properties that directly relate to the nanoprism shape of the particles. Theoretical calculations coupled with experimental observations allow for the assignment of the nanoprism plasmon bands and for the first identification of two distinct quadrupole plasmon resonances for a nanoparticle. Unlike the spherical particles they are derived from that Rayleigh light-scatter in the blue, these nanoprisms exhibit scattering in the red, which could be useful in developing multicolor diagnostic labels on the basis not only of nanoparticle composition and size but also of shape.

3,256 citations