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Author

M. Lukacs

Bio: M. Lukacs is an academic researcher from Telcordia Technologies. The author has contributed to research in topics: Frame (networking) & Transmission (telecommunications). The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 115 citations.

Papers
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
M. Lukacs1
07 Apr 1986
TL;DR: The use of digital predictive coding as a means of data compression for the transmission or storage of a set of spatially related images needed for an autostereoscopic display and a new sort of predictor called Disparity Corrected Prediction are described.
Abstract: Three dimensional display of moving images greatly enhances realism and adds a unique sense of "presence". Three dimensional video systems have been kept from widespread application by two technical problems, the need for glasses, viewing hoods, or other cumbersome devices for image steering, and the high bandwidths needed for transmission. Devices that avoid the discomfort of headgear by using autostereoscopic (pseudo-holographic) displays are known, but these methods require even higher bandwidths to be effective. This paper introduces the use of digital predictive coding as a means of data compression for the transmission or storage of a set of spatially related images needed for an autostereoscopic display. (Interframe coding without frame memories.) The algorithms, implementations, and application of a new sort of predictor called Disparity Corrected Prediction are described.

118 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
31 Jan 2011
TL;DR: An overview of the algorithmic design used for extending H.264/MPEG-4 AVC towards MVC is provided and a summary of the coding performance achieved by MVC for both stereo- and multiview video is provided.
Abstract: Significant improvements in video compression capability have been demonstrated with the introduction of the H.264/MPEG-4 advanced video coding (AVC) standard. Since developing this standard, the Joint Video Team of the ITU-T Video Coding Experts Group (VCEG) and the ISO/IEC Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) has also standardized an extension of that technology that is referred to as multiview video coding (MVC). MVC provides a compact representation for multiple views of a video scene, such as multiple synchronized video cameras. Stereo-paired video for 3-D viewing is an important special case of MVC. The standard enables inter-view prediction to improve compression capability, as well as supporting ordinary temporal and spatial prediction. It also supports backward compatibility with existing legacy systems by structuring the MVC bitstream to include a compatible “base view.” Each other view is encoded at the same picture resolution as the base view. In recognition of its high-quality encoding capability and support for backward compatibility, the stereo high profile of the MVC extension was selected by the Blu-Ray Disc Association as the coding format for 3-D video with high-definition resolution. This paper provides an overview of the algorithmic design used for extending H.264/MPEG-4 AVC towards MVC. The basic approach of MVC for enabling inter-view prediction and view scalability in the context of H.264/MPEG-4 AVC is reviewed. Related supplemental enhancement information (SEI) metadata is also described. Various “frame compatible” approaches for support of stereo-view video as an alternative to MVC are also discussed. A summary of the coding performance achieved by MVC for both stereo- and multiview video is also provided. Future directions and challenges related to 3-D video are also briefly discussed.

683 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The techniques for image-based rendering (IBR), in which 3-D geometry of the scene is known, are surveyed and the issues in trading off the use of images and geometry by revisiting plenoptic-sampling analysis and the notions of view dependency and geometric proxies are explored.
Abstract: We survey the techniques for image-based rendering (IBR) and for compressing image-based representations. Unlike traditional three-dimensional (3-D) computer graphics, in which 3-D geometry of the scene is known, IBR techniques render novel views directly from input images. IBR techniques can be classified into three categories according to how much geometric information is used: rendering without geometry, rendering with implicit geometry (i.e., correspondence), and rendering with explicit geometry (either with approximate or accurate geometry). We discuss the characteristics of these categories and their representative techniques. IBR techniques demonstrate a surprising diverse range in their extent of use of images and geometry in representing 3-D scenes. We explore the issues in trading off the use of images and geometry by revisiting plenoptic-sampling analysis and the notions of view dependency and geometric proxies. Finally, we highlight compression techniques specifically designed for image-based representations. Such compression techniques are important in making IBR techniques practical.

310 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is proved that the rate distortion limit for coding stereopairs cannot in general be achieved by a coder that first codes and decodes the right picture sequence independently of the left picture sequence, and then codes anddecodes theleft picture sequence given the decoded right picture sequences.
Abstract: Two fundamentally different techniques for compressing stereopairs are discussed. The first technique, called disparity-compensated transform-domain predictive coding, attempts to minimize the mean-square error between the original stereopair and the compressed stereopair. The second technique, called mixed-resolution coding, is a psychophysically justified technique that exploits known facts about human stereovision to code stereopairs in a subjectively acceptable manner. A method for assessing the quality of compressed stereopairs is also presented. It involves measuring the ability of an observer to perceive depth in coded stereopairs. It was found that observers generally perceived objects to be further away in compressed stereopairs than they did in originals. It is proved that the rate distortion limit for coding stereopairs cannot in general be achieved by a coder that first codes and decodes the right picture sequence independently of the left picture sequence, and then codes and decodes the left picture sequence given the decoded right picture sequence. >

243 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper provides an overview of relevant 3D representation and compression formats and analyzes some of the merits and drawbacks of these formats considering the application requirements and constraints imposed by different storage and transmission systems.
Abstract: There exist a variety of ways to represent 3D content, including stereo and multiview video, as well as frame-compatible and depth-based video formats. There are also a number of compression architectures and techniques that have been introduced in recent years. This paper provides an overview of relevant 3D representation and compression formats. It also analyzes some of the merits and drawbacks of these formats considering the application requirements and constraints imposed by different storage and transmission systems.

156 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper presents a method to exploit inter-view similarity between adjacent camera views and temporal similarity between temporally successive images of each video for efficient compression of multiview imagery.
Abstract: Due to the vast raw bit rate of multiview video, efficient compression techniques are essential for 3D scene communication. As the video data originate from the same scene, the inherent similarities of the multiview imagery are exploited for efficient compression. These similarities can be classified into two types, inter-view similarity between adjacent camera views and temporal similarity between temporally successive images of each video.

127 citations