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Author

M. McAllister

Bio: M. McAllister is an academic researcher from University of Houston. The author has contributed to research in topics: Antenna (radio) & Dielectric resonator antenna. The author has an hindex of 5, co-authored 8 publications receiving 1981 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an experimental investigation of the radiation and circuit properties of a resonant cylindrical dielectric cavity antenna has been undertaken, and a simple theory utilizing the magnetic wall boundary condition is shown to correlate well with measured results for radiation patterns and resonant frequencies.
Abstract: An experimental investigation of the radiation and circuit properties of a resonant cylindrical dielectric cavity antenna has been undertaken. The radiation patterns and input impedance have been measured for structures of various geometrical aspect ratios, dielectric constants, and sizes of coaxial feed probes. A simple theory utilizing the magnetic wall boundary condition is shown to correlate well with measured results for radiation patterns and resonant frequencies.

1,434 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an antenna consisting of a resonant dielectric hemisphere on top of a ground plane is investigated, with emphasis on the lowest-order mode that results in efficient radiation in the direction perpendicular to the ground plane.
Abstract: An antenna consisting of a resonant dielectric hemisphere on top of a ground plane is investigated. Calculations of the internal and external fields are made with emphasis on the lowest-order mode that results in efficient radiation in the direction perpendicular to the ground plane. Measured input impedance data are also presented for a practical radiator.

389 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an antenna which consists of a resonant rectangular parallelepiped dielectric on top of a ground plane is described, and the effects of feed probe length variations are discussed.
Abstract: An antenna which consists of a resonant rectangular parallelepiped dielectric on top of a ground plane is described. Calculated radiation patterns and measured impedances are presented, and the effects of feed probe length variations are discussed.

322 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
16 Jun 1981
TL;DR: In this paper, a resonant circuit model for the input impedance of an elliptical printed-circuit antenna has been developed and the results compared with experimental data, and the impedance and bandwidth were then calculated as a function of the size, eccentricity, and thickness of the radiator.
Abstract: A resonant circuit model for the input impedance of an elliptical printed-circuit antenna has been developed and the results compared with experimental data. The impedance and bandwidth were then calculated as a function of the size, eccentricity, and thickness of the radiator.

25 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the input impedance of a probe-fed cylindrical structure was examined in detail and a comparison of theoretical and experimental results was made, and the performance of a variety of these dielectric resonator antennas was compared.
Abstract: Dielectric cylinders of very high permittivity have been used in the past as resonant cavities, but since the structure is not enclosed by metallic walls, electromagnetic fields do exist beyond the geometrical boundaries of the structure and part of the power is radiated. Through the proper choice of geometry and permittivity this radiation can become the dominant feature of the structure and become an efficient antenna for use at millimeter wave frequencies. Both experimental and theoretical investigations of a variety of these dielectric resonator antennas have been undertaken. In particular, the input impedance of a probe-fed cylindrical structure was examined in detail and a comparison of theoretical and experimental results was made.

14 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Recent progress in the physics of metasurfaces operating at wavelengths ranging from microwave to visible is reviewed, with opinions of opportunities and challenges in this rapidly developing research field.
Abstract: Metamaterials are composed of periodic subwavelength metal/dielectric structures that resonantly couple to the electric and/or magnetic components of the incident electromagnetic fields, exhibiting properties that are not found in nature. This class of micro- and nano-structured artificial media have attracted great interest during the past 15 years and yielded ground-breaking electromagnetic and photonic phenomena. However, the high losses and strong dispersion associated with the resonant responses and the use of metallic structures, as well as the difficulty in fabricating the micro- and nanoscale 3D structures, have hindered practical applications of metamaterials. Planar metamaterials with subwavelength thickness, or metasurfaces, consisting of single-layer or few-layer stacks of planar structures, can be readily fabricated using lithography and nanoprinting methods, and the ultrathin thickness in the wave propagation direction can greatly suppress the undesirable losses. Metasurfaces enable a spatially varying optical response (e.g. scattering amplitude, phase, and polarization), mold optical wavefronts into shapes that can be designed at will, and facilitate the integration of functional materials to accomplish active control and greatly enhanced nonlinear response. This paper reviews recent progress in the physics of metasurfaces operating at wavelengths ranging from microwave to visible. We provide an overview of key metasurface concepts such as anomalous reflection and refraction, and introduce metasurfaces based on the Pancharatnam-Berry phase and Huygens' metasurfaces, as well as their use in wavefront shaping and beam forming applications, followed by a discussion of polarization conversion in few-layer metasurfaces and their related properties. An overview of dielectric metasurfaces reveals their ability to realize unique functionalities coupled with Mie resonances and their low ohmic losses. We also describe metasurfaces for wave guidance and radiation control, as well as active and nonlinear metasurfaces. Finally, we conclude by providing our opinions of opportunities and challenges in this rapidly developing research field.

1,528 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Metamaterials are composed of periodic subwavelength metal/dielectric structures that resonantly couple to the electric and/or magnetic components of the incident electromagnetic fields, exhibiting properties that are not found in nature as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Metamaterials are composed of periodic subwavelength metal/dielectric structures that resonantly couple to the electric and/or magnetic components of the incident electromagnetic fields, exhibiting properties that are not found in nature. Planar metamaterials with subwavelength thickness, or metasurfaces, consisting of single-layer or few-layer stacks of planar structures, can be readily fabricated using lithography and nanoprinting methods, and the ultrathin thickness in the wave propagation direction can greatly suppress the undesirable losses. Metasurfaces enable a spatially varying optical response, mold optical wavefronts into shapes that can be designed at will, and facilitate the integration of functional materials to accomplish active control and greatly enhanced nonlinear response. This paper reviews recent progress in the physics of metasurfaces operating at wavelengths ranging from microwave to visible. We provide an overview of key metasurface concepts such as anomalous reflection and refraction, and introduce metasurfaces based on the Pancharatnam-Berry phase and Huygens' metasurfaces, as well as their use in wavefront shaping and beam forming applications, followed by a discussion of polarization conversion in few-layer metasurfaces and their related properties. An overview of dielectric metasurfaces reveals their ability to realize unique functionalities coupled with Mie resonances and their low ohmic losses. We also describe metasurfaces for wave guidance and radiation control, as well as active and nonlinear metasurfaces. Finally, we conclude by providing our opinions of opportunities and challenges in this rapidly developing research field.

1,106 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
21 Aug 2013-ACS Nano
TL;DR: It is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that the interference of electric and magnetic optically induced modes in individual subwavelength silicon nanodisks can lead to the suppression of resonant backscattering and to enhanced resonant forward scattering of light.
Abstract: Interference of optically induced electric and magnetic modes in high-index all-dielectric nanoparticles offers unique opportunities for tailoring directional scattering and engineering the flow of light. In this article we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the interference of electric and magnetic optically induced modes in individual subwavelength silicon nanodisks can lead to the suppression of resonant backscattering and to enhanced resonant forward scattering of light. To this end we spectrally tune the nanodisk’s fundamental electric and magnetic resonances with respect to each other by a variation of the nanodisk aspect ratio. This ability to tune two modes of different character within the same nanoparticle provides direct control over their interference, and, in consequence, allows for engineering the particle’s resonant and off-resonant scattering patterns. Most importantly, measured and numerically calculated transmittance spectra reveal that backward scattering can be suppresse...

1,021 citations

Book ChapterDOI
15 Apr 2005
TL;DR: Linearly and circularly polarized conformal strip-fed dielectric resonator antennas (DRAs) are studied in this article, where a parasitic patch is used to excite a nearly degenerate mode.
Abstract: Linearly and circularly polarized conformal strip-fed dielectric resonator antennas (DRAs) are studied in this article. In the latter case, a parasitic patch is used to excite a nearly degenerate mode. The hemispherical DRA, excited in its fundamental broadside TE111 mode, is used for the demonstration. In the analysis, the mode-matching method is used to obtain the Green's functions, whereas the method of moments is used to solve for the unknown strip currents. In order to solve the singularity problem of the Green's functions, a recurrence technique is used to evaluate the impedance integrals. This greatly increases the numerical efficiency. Measurements were carried out to verify the calculations, with good results. Keywords: circularly polarized antenna; dielectric antennas; mode-matching methods; moment methods; parasitic antennas; resonance

898 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a comprehensive review of the modes and the radiation characteristics of open dielectric resonators (DRs) of different shapes, such as cylindrical, spherical, and rectangular, is presented.
Abstract: Open dielectric resonators (DRs) offer attractive features as antenna elements. These include their small size, mechanical simplicity, high radiation efficiency due to no inherent conductor loss, relatively large bandwidth, simple coupling schemes to nearly all commonly used transmission lines, and the advantage of obtaining different radiation characteristics using different modes of the resonator. In this article, we give a comprehensive review of the modes and the radiation characteristics of DRs of different shapes, such as cylindrical, cylindrical ring, spherical, and rectangular. Further, accurate closed form expressions are derived for the resonant frequencies, radiation Q-factors, and the inside fields of a cylindrical DR. These design expressions are valid over a wide range of DR parameters. Finally, the techniques used to feed DR antennas are discussed. © 1994 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

861 citations