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Author

M. Moniruzzaman

Other affiliations: Kobe University
Bio: M. Moniruzzaman is an academic researcher from Bangladesh Agricultural University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Oocyte & Biology. The author has an hindex of 11, co-authored 37 publications receiving 313 citations. Previous affiliations of M. Moniruzzaman include Kobe University.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Results show that oocytes grow and follicles develop without KIT signaling, although KIT might be essential for the survival of germ cells/oocytes in mice.
Abstract: In mammals, oocyte growth and follicular development are known to be regulated by KIT, a tyrosine kinase receptor. Fas is a member of the death receptor family inducing apoptosis. Here, we investigated germ cell survival, oocyte growth and follicular development in KIT-deficient (Wv/Wv:Fas+/+), Fas-deficient (+/+:Fas-/-), and both KIT- and Fas-deficient (Wv/Wv:Fas-/-) mice during fetal and postnatal periods. Further, the ovaries of these mice were transplanted in immunodeficient mice to compare oocyte growth and follicular development under a condition isolated from the extraovarian effects of KIT- and Fas-deficiency. Higher numbers of germ cells were found in the fetal and postnatal ovaries of Fas-deficient mice than in the same-aged wild-type mice. In KIT-deficient mice, ovaries at 13 days postcoitum (dpc) contained 1106+/-72 (n=3) germ cells, but the ovaries contained no oocytes after birth. Twenty-one days after transplantation of the ovaries at 13 dpc, no oocytes/germ cells were found. A higher number of germ cells (3843+/-108; n=3) were observed in the Wv/Wv:Fas-/- genotypes than in Wv/Wv:Fas+/+ mice at 13 dpc. Furthermore, Wv/Wv:Fas-/- mice contained 528+/-91 (n=3) oocytes at 2 days, and follicles developed to the antral stage at 14 days of age. After transplantation of fetal and neonatal ovaries from Wv/Wv:Fas-/- mice, increased numbers of growing oocytes and developing follicles were obtained compared with those in 14-day old ovaries in vivo. These results show that oocytes grow and follicles develop without KIT signaling, although KIT might be essential for the survival of germ cells/oocytes in mice.

39 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Primordial follicles from neonatal pigs maintained their developmental ability after vitrification and warming, although their developmental rate was slower than that of the fresh control in xenografts.

34 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results suggest that KIT-KL might not be associated with the growth initiation of porcine primordial oocytes, although they do enhance the survival of the oocytes.
Abstract: Mammalian ovaries are endowed with a huge number of small oocytes in primordial follicles (primordial oocytes). The mechanism regulating initiation of oocyte growth and follicular development is not well understood. Several growth factors and cytokines are known to be involved in oocyte growth and follicular development. Herein, the involvement of KIT, a receptor tyrosine kinase, and its ligand, KIT ligand (KL), in the initiation of porcine oocyte growth was examined. At first, KIT expression was examined immunohistochemically in primordial oocytes from neonatal (10-20 days) and prepubertal (about 6 months) pigs. Similar expression of KIT was detected in all oocytes from both the neonatal and prepubertal pigs. Next, to examine the growth of primordial oocytes, ovarian tissues containing primordial oocytes were xenotransplanted into immunodeficient SCID mice. Primordial oocytes from the neonatal pigs grew with follicular development as described previously, whereas those from the prepubertal pigs did not initiate growth in the xenografts after 2 months. To stimulate the growth of primordial oocytes from the prepubertal pigs, they were cultured in a medium supplemented with KL (50 and 100 ng/ml) for 1 or 3 days before xenografting. After 2 months, however, the oocytes did not grow, and the primordial follicles did not develop, although a higher number of primordial oocytes survived in the KL-treated tissues. These results suggest that KIT-KL might not be associated with the growth initiation of porcine primordial oocytes, although they do enhance the survival of the oocytes.

33 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A model is proposed in which ovaries of neonatal mammals contain a mixed population of both quiescent and activated primordial oocytes, while almost all primordialOocytes are quiesent in adult females, which suggests the dormancy of primordial Oocytes may be required to reserve the non-growing oocyte pool for the long reproductive life in mammals.
Abstract: Mammalian ovaries are endowed with a huge number of small oocytes (primordial oocytes) in primordial follicles. A small number of primordial oocytes start to grow, while others remain quiescent. Little is known about the mechanism regulating the activation of primordial oocytes. Recently, we found that primordial follicles in mature cows and prepubertal pigs took longer to initiate growth in xenografts compared with those in neonatal animals. We think that primordial oocytes in adult mammals are different from those in neonatal mammals. In this review, we summarize the results regarding the activation of primordial oocytes in neonatal and adult ovaries of different species and propose a model in which ovaries of neonatal mammals contain a mixed population of both quiescent and activated primordial oocytes, while almost all primordial oocytes are quiescent in adult females. The dormancy of primordial oocytes may be required to reserve the non-growing oocyte pool for the long reproductive life in mammals. FOXO3 is considered one of the molecules responsible for the dormancy of primordial oocytes in adult ovaries. These quiescent primordial oocytes are activated, perhaps by certain mechanisms involving the interaction between stimulatory and inhibitory factors, to enter the growth phase.

26 citations

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TL;DR: Bovine secondary follicles were successfully cryopreserved in Sucrose-containing vitrification solutions and maintained their ability to develop to the antral stage and grow oocytes, whereas primordial follicles vitrified in sucrose-free solution maintained their morphology and developed to theantral stage, with oocyte growth.

26 citations


Cited by
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TL;DR: The principles of vitification are summarized, the advantages of vitrification protocols for ovarian tissue cryopreservation are discussed and different studies conducted on the vitrification of ovarian tissue in humans and animal species are described.
Abstract: Because of the simplicity of vitrification, many authors have investigated it as an alternative to slow freezing for cryopreserving ovarian tissue. In the last decade, numerous studies have evaluated vitrification of ovarian tissue from both humans and animals.Different vitrification solutions and protocols, mostly adapted from embryo and oocyte vitrification, have been applied. The results have been discrepant from species to species and even within the same species, but lately they appear to indicate that vitrification can achieve similar or even superior results to conventional freezing. Despite the encouraging results obtained with vitrification of ovarian tissue from humans and different animal species, it is necessary to understand how vitrification solutions and protocols can affect ovarian tissue, notably preantral follicles. In addition, it is important to bear in mind that the utilization of different approaches to assess tissue functionality and oocyte quality is essential in order to validate the promising results already obtained with vitrification procedures. This review summarizes the principles of vitrification, discusses the advantages of vitrification protocols for ovarian tissue cryopreservation and describes different studies conducted on the vitrification of ovarian tissue in humans and animal species.

176 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The regulatory steps that determine the number of primordial follicles and thus thenumber of oocytes in the ovarian reserve at birth are outlined, using the mouse as the model, interspersed with human data where available.
Abstract: The number of primordial follicles in the ovarian reserve is an important determinant of the length of the ovarian lifespan, and therefore the fertility of an individual. This reserve contains all of the oocytes potentially available for fertilization throughout the fertile lifespan. The maximum number is set during pregnancy or just after birth in most mammalian species; current evidence does not support neofolliculogenesis after the ovarian reserve is established, although this is increasingly being reexamined. Under physiological circumstances, this number will be influenced by the number of primordial germ cells initially specified in the epiblast of the developing embryo, their proliferation during and after migration to the developing gonads, and their death during oogenesis and formation of primordial follicles at nest breakdown. Death of germ cells during the establishment of the ovarian reserve occurs principally by autophagy or apoptosis, although the triggers that initiate these remain elusive. This review outlines the regulatory steps that determine the number of primordial follicles and thus the number of oocytes in the ovarian reserve at birth, using the mouse as the model, interspersed with human data where available. This information has application for understanding the variability in duration of fertility that occurs between normal individuals and with age, in premature ovarian insufficiency, and after chemotherapy or radiotherapy.

127 citations

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TL;DR: The controversial concept of postnatal oogenesis is discussed, which posits a rare population of oogonial stem cells that contribute new oocytes to partially compensate for the age-related decline in the primordial follicle reserve.
Abstract: The female germline comprises a reserve population of primordial (non-growing) follicles containing diplotene oocytes arrested in the first meiotic prophase. By convention, the reserve is established when all individual oocytes are enclosed by granulosa cells. This commonly occurs prior to or around birth, according to species. Histologically, the 'reserve' is the number of primordial follicles in the ovary at any given age and is ultimately depleted by degeneration and progression through folliculogenesis until exhausted. How and when the reserve reaches its peak number of follicles is determined by ovarian morphogenesis and germ cell dynamics involving i) oogonial proliferation and entry into meiosis producing an oversupply of oocytes and ii) large-scale germ cell death resulting in markedly reduced numbers surviving as the primordial follicle reserve. Our understanding of the processes maintaining the reserve comes primarily from genetically engineered mouse models, experimental activation or destruction of oocytes, and quantitative histological analysis. As the source of ovulated oocytes in postnatal life, the primordial follicle reserve requires regulation of i) its survival or maintenance, ii) suppression of development (dormancy), and iii) activation for growth and entry into folliculogenesis. The mechanisms influencing these alternate and complex inter-related phenomena remain to be fully elucidated. Drawing upon direct and indirect evidence, we discuss the controversial concept of postnatal oogenesis. This posits a rare population of oogonial stem cells that contribute new oocytes to partially compensate for the age-related decline in the primordial follicle reserve.

126 citations